22 November 2017

On love and marriage

'Love whom you will but marry your own kind was a dictum amounting to instinct within her.'

- Go Set a Watchman

On the meaning of life

''Every man’s island, Jean Louise, every man’s watchman, is his conscience. There is no such thing as a collective conscious.''

- Go Set a Watchman

On parents

'Our mother died when I was two, so I never felt her absence... I did not miss her, but I think Jem did. He remembered her clearly, and sometimes in the middle of a game he would sigh at length, then go off and play by himself behind the car-house. When he was like that, I knew better than to bother him.'

- To Kill a Mockingbird

On money

'The Cunninghams never took anything they can't pay back – no church baskets and no scrip stamps. They never took anything off anybody. They get along with what they have. They don't have much, but they get along with it.'

- To Kill a Mockingbird

On death

'Sometimes the Bible in the hand of one man is worse than a whisky bottle in the hand of (another). There are just some kind of men who – who're so busy worrying about the next world they've never learned to live in this one, and you can look down the street and see the results.'

- To Kill a Mockingbird

  • To Kill A Mockingbird

  • 'Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a mockingbird.'

    A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of Harper Lee's classic novel - a black man charged with the rape of a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores with exuberant humour the irrationality of adult attitudes to race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s. The conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence and hypocrisy is pricked by the stamina of one man's struggle for justice. But the weight of history will only tolerate so much.

    To Kill a Mockingbird is a coming-of-age story, an anti-racist novel, a historical drama of the Great Depression and a sublime example of the Southern writing tradition.

  • Buy the book
  • Go Set a Watchman

  • From Harper Lee comes a landmark new novel set two decades after her beloved Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece, To Kill a Mockingbird.

    Maycomb, Alabama. Twenty-six-year-old Jean Louise Finch – ‘Scout’ – returns home from New York City to visit her ageing father, Atticus. Set against the backdrop of the civil rights tensions and political turmoil that were transforming the South, Jean Louise’s homecoming turns bittersweet when she learns disturbing truths about her close-knit family, the town and the people dearest to her. Memories from her childhood flood back, and her values and assumptions are thrown into doubt. Featuring many of the iconic characters from To Kill a Mockingbird, Go Set a Watchman perfectly captures a young woman, and a world, in painful yet necessary transition out of the illusions of the past – a journey that can be guided only by one’s own conscience.

    Written in the mid-1950s, Go Set a Watchman imparts a fuller, richer understanding and appreciation of Harper Lee. Here is an unforgettable novel of wisdom, humanity, passion, humour and effortless precision – a profoundly affecting work of art that is both wonderfully evocative of another era and relevant to our own times. It not only confirms the enduring brilliance of To Kill a Mockingbird, but also serves as its essential companion, adding depth, context and new meaning to a classic.

  • Buy the book

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