Reading list

8 books to read if you love Black Mirror

If  you're obsessed with the dark, creepy and utterly absorbing worlds of Netflix series Black Mirror, then you'll love these 8 books...

The One

John Marrs

What if there was no more need for Tinder? For blind dates? For unsuccessful romances? In John Marrs' The One, finding your perfect match is simply one mouth swab away - that's all it takes for you to find the person that you're genetically made for. But even soul mates have secrets, and what if the person you're matched with is harbouring the darkest secret of all?
 

The Peripheral

William Gibson

From the author of Neuromancer comes the tale of two characters, seventy-some years apart, whose paths cross when one of them, Flynne, is pulled into freelance online game-playing that takes her on a journey into the future where she encounters Wilf, a man on the far side of the apocalyse where things are good for the haves, and there aren't many have-nots left.
 

The Last One

Alexandra Oliva

Zoo takes part in a reality show in the search for adventure, aiming to beat eleven competitors in a series of survival tasks while deep in the wilderness. However, things soon begin to become even darker as the contestants are subjected to twisted mind games - abandoned towns and gruesome props begin to haunt them. But what if these aren't games? What if something is happening in the world that makes the contestants task of survival so much more than just a game?
 

Irresistible

Adam Alter

If you're a fan of the "Nosedive" episode of Black Mirror, then you'll love Adam Alter's exploration of society's current obsession with media and technology, made irresistibly accessible through the phones in our pockets. Alter dives to the effects this has on our social development, blends fascinating stories with ingenious science to explain how and why we all got hooked.

 

Dark Tales

Shirley Jackson

What makes Black Mirror so brilliant is its ability to create worlds that mirror our own in believable ways, while introducing an element of twisted darkness that draws us in. Shirley Jackson does this magnificently in her series of deliciously dark tales about suburbia and the rotten core that hides behind its manicured lawns and picket fences.

 

Goodhouse

Peyton Marshall

Goodhouse isn't a prison. Despite the dogs, guards, tracking devices and reinforced fences, Goodhouse is a final chance for boys who have genetic markers that identify them as individuals with the potential for violent and criminal behaviour - they will stay in Goodhouse until they turn 18 in an attempt to 'fix' them. With a plot that sounds like something directly from a Black Mirror episode, Goodhouse is a must read for fans of the show.

 

True Names

Vernor Vinge

Part of the newly reissued Penguin Worlds series, True Names is a seminal work of the cyberpunk genre that tells the story of Mr Slippery, an illegal computer hacker and expert in virtual reality who finds himself pitted against an international cybercriminal. Perfect for fans of science fiction who want to explore the roots of the world they love so much.
 

All Our Wrong Todays

Elan Mastai

Elan Mastai tells the story of Tom Barren, a man who comes from a 2016 in which technology has resulted in a utopian society where all of man's problems are solved. Tom's only problem is that the girl of his dreams is gone, and he decides to use his access to a time machine to change things. This results in Tom finding himself in a terrible alternate reality that we can recognise as our 2016. Bitingly hilarious and filled with mind-bending science and unexpected moments of hope, All Our Wrong Todays is a refreshing addition to the time-travel genre.
 

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