Reading list

Classic books explained for the Snowflake generation

Heroes in the classics have a really tough time. From Dickens and Austen to Wilde and Orwell, we've put together synopses for the more sensitive reader

North and South

Elizabeth Gaskell

Margaret Hale travels North to woo factory owner after Southern house prices outstrip her annual pin money. 


Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë

When super-emotional Cathy falls for overly-ambitious Heathcliff, everyone’s life is turned upside down. 


Great Expectations

Charles Dickens

Orphan is forced to fraternise with criminals after bitter old woman denies him inheritance. 



The Picture of Dorian Grey

Oscar Wilde

Millennial hides away hideous selfie in a bid to avoid ever looking like his Dad. 

The Great Gatsby

F. Scott Fitgerald

Lovesick rich guy throws lavish parties in a romantic attempt to ensnare his ex-girlfriend, who in turn plays with his feelings and gets away with murder. 


Nineteen Eighty-Four

George Orwell

Man is entirely comfortable with creeping encroachment of the state. Doesn’t infringe on his life at all.


Les Misérables

Victor Hugo

Gym freak is stalked by obsessive policeman after swiping a slice of avocado toast.

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë

As #girlboss Jane Eyre's glass ceiling metaphorically and physically burns down, getting married offers her a chance to raise a house deposit.


Jane Austen

Denied a smartphone by her father, Emma disastrously tries her hand at match-making without Tinder.



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