A.A. Milne

Winnie-The-Pooh
  • Winnie-The-Pooh

  • Alan Bennett reads A.A. Milne's much-loved stories about a small bear and his friends. The collection includes; Winnie the Pooh, The House at Pooh Corner and A Party for Pooh.

    What is the connection between a bear of very little brain and a honey pot? Usually it's the very sticky paw of Winnie the Pooh, as he takes a break between adventures for a little something. In these stories, taken from the book 'Winnie-the-Pooh', Pooh goes visiting and gets into a tight place, Eeyore loses a tail, Piglet meets a Heffalump, Eeyore has a birthday and gets two presents, and an expedition is mounted to the North Pole! As usual they are accompanied by Kanga, Roo, Rabbit and Owl - to say nothing of Pooh's very clever young human friend, Christopher Robin. Now with a musical introduction, Alan Bennett gives A.A. Milne's characters the voices you felt they were always meant to have in this collection of stories about Winnie the Pooh, Piglet, Tigger, Eeyore and Owl.

    The stories are:
    Winnie-the-Pooh Goes Visiting and Gets into a Tight Place
    Pooh and Piglet Nearly Catch a Woozle and Eeyore Loses a Tail
    Piglet Meets a Heffalump
    Eeyore has a birthday and Gets Two Presents
    Christopher Robin Leads an Exposition to the North Pole
    A House is Built at Pooh Corner for Eeyore
    Tigger Comes to the Forest and has Breakfast
    A Search is Organdized and Piglet Nearly Meets the Heffalump Again
    Pooh Invents a New Game and Eeyore Joins In
    Piglet Does a Very Grand Thing and Owl Moves House
    Kanga and Baby Roo Come to the Forest
    Piglet is Entirely Surrounded by Water
    Christoper Robin Gives Pooh a Party
    Tiggers Don't Climb Trees
    Rabbit has a Busy Day
    Tigger is Unbounced

Alan Bennett was born and brought up in Leeds. He read history at Oxford and collaborated with Peter Cook, Jonathan Miller and Dudley Moore in the revue Beyond the Fringe in the West End and on Broadway. Bennett’s first stage play, Forty Years On, played for more than a year in the West End. Subsequent plays included Getting On (1971) and the farce Habeas Corpus (1973). His television plays include An Englishman Abroad (1983) starring Alan Bates and Carol Browne and A Question of Attribution (1988) which examined the treachery of art historian Sir Anthony Blunt. Alan Bennett’s other best known works include his adaptation of The Wind in the Willows (1990) for the National Theatre, The Madness of George III (1991, also for the National and subsequently an Oscar-winning film) and, for BBC TV, two series of the monologues Talking Heads. His collection of diary entries, essays and reviews, Writing Home, was Book of the Year in 1994. Alan Bennett has made many recordings for the BBC, including The Lady in the Van about the eccentric Miss Shepherd, who lived in a van in his garden, and which he adapted for the stage in 1999 and for the cinema in 2014. 2005 saw the publication of his first major collection of writing since Writing Home. Untold Stories brought together the very best of his writing, as well as his much-celebrated diaries from 1996-2004. In 2006, following a sell-out tour, Bennett’s play The History Boys returned to the National Theatre for an extended run. Set in a boys’ grammar school in Sheffield, it garnered many awards and went on to tour New Zealand and Australia and open in New York in 2006. It received six Tony Awards, and was adapted for the cinema that same year. Among Alan Bennett’s more recent work are the stage plays The Habit of Art (2009), People (2012) and Cocktail Sticks (2012) and the novella Smut (2011).

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