Malcolm Kohll

Doctor Who: The Second Earth Adventures Collection
  • Doctor Who: The Second Earth Adventures Collection

  • A collection of five classic TV novelisations featuring the Doctor's hectic adventures on Earth. In Planet of Giants present day England becomes a nightmare landscape when a freak accident causes the TARDIS and its occupants to be reduced to miniature size.

    In The Massacre the Doctor and Steven land in 16th Century Paris, where danger stalks the streets. In The Invasion present day London has been infiltrated by International Electromatics in collaboration with the Cybermen.

    In The Horror of Fang Rock the TARDIS lands on a foggy island beset by death and disaster. In Delta and the Bannermen the Doctor and Mel find themselves holed up in a remote Welsh holiday camp, where several of the holidaymakers are not what they first appear...

    Carole Ann Ford, Peter Purves, David Troughton, Louise Jameson and Bonnie Langford read these classic tales, first published as Target Books in the 1970s and 1980s. Nicholas Briggs provides the authentic voice of the Cybermen.

    (P) 2022 BBC Studios Distribution Ltd © 2022 BBC Studios Distribution Ltd

RELEASED 01/09/2022

Terrance Dicks (Author) Terrance Dicks became Script Editor of Doctor Who in 1968, co-writing Patrick Troughton's classic final serial, The War Games, and editing the show throughout the entire Jon Pertwee era to 1974. He wrote many iconic episodes and serials for the show after, including Tom Baker's first episode as the Fourth Doctor, Robot; Horror at Fang Rock in 1977; State of Decay in 1980; and the 20th anniversary special, The Five Doctors in 1983. Terrance novelised over sixty of the original Doctor Who stories for Target books, including classics like Doctor Who and the Abominable Snowmen and Doctor Who and the Auton Invasion, inspiring a generation of children to become readers and writers. He died in August 2019, only weeks before the publication of his final Doctor Who short story, 'Save Yourself', in The Target Storybook. Douglas Adams (Author) Douglas Noel Adams was born on 11 March 1952 in Cambridge. His parents divorced when he was five, and Douglas and his younger sister Susan were brought up by their mother in Essex. From 1959 to 1970 Douglas attended Brentwood School, and he first thought seriously about writing when a teacher named Frank Halford gave him ten out of ten for a composition. He was the only boy ever to have been awarded full marks. Leaving school in December 1970, Douglas won a scholarship to study English at Cambridge. His main reason for going there was to join Footlights, although his first attempt to do so was a failure. He succeeded in joining in his second term, but found the group which ran the society a bit stand-offish. He also felt constrained by the limits of pantomimes and mid-term revues, so instead he set up his own revue group, Adams-Smith-Adams, with two friends. It was very successful. Douglas left Cambridge in the summer of 1974 and took occasional office jobs before joining forces with Monty Python team member Graham Chapman. They collaborated on a number of projects; unfortunately, very few of them were ever broadcast. A while later he was invited to Cambridge to direct the 1976 Footlights revue, but even this turned out to be a disappointment. At the end of the year, broke and feeling like a failure, Douglas moved back home with his mother. In 1977 his luck changed. Through his former flatmate John Lloyd, Douglas met BBC Radio 4 producer Simon Brett. He felt that Douglas' style of humour should have its own show, rather than being crammed into existing formats. Having been inspired by a copy of The Hitchhiker's Guide to Europe, Douglas came up with a draft for The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy. After several delays the first six-episode series was broadcast, with a second rapidly following. The worldwide phenomenon they spawned includes five novels, a book of scripts, two LPs, a television series, a computer game and two stage plays. In addition to Hitchhiker, Douglas' work included two Dirk Gently detective novels and two humorous place-name 'dictionaries', The Meaning of Liff and The Deeper Meaning of Liff (both co-written with John Lloyd) as well as Last Chance to See, an account of a global search for rare and endangered species which he co-wrote with Mark Carwardine. In 1999 Douglas moved to Santa Barbara with his wife and daughter to work on a proposed Hitchhiker film. Always a keen advocate of new technology, his last series for Radio 4 was The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Future, a look at the advances mankind was likely to make in future years.He died suddenly of a heart attack, aged 49, in May 2001. A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy feature film was produced in 2005, whilst both Stephen Mangan and Samuel Barnett have portrayed Dirk Gently on television in recent years. James Goss (Author) James Goss has adapted three Doctor Who stories by Douglas Adams for BBC Books (City of Death, The Pirate Planet, and The Krikkitmen). He's also written several original Doctor Who and Torchwood books. His novel #Haterz is in development as a motion picture. He's also written for the stage and the radio.

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