Jonathan Barnes

The Nicomachean Ethics
  • The Nicomachean Ethics

    • Aristotle

    • Jonathan Barnes (Introducer)

    • J. A. K. Thomson (Translator)

    A profound examination of the nature of happiness by one of the giants of ancient Greek philosophy

    In The Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle argues that happiness consists in 'activity of the soul in accordance with virtue' - for example, with moral virtues, such as courage, generosity and justice, and intellectual virtues, such as knowledge, wisdom and insight. The Ethics also discusses the nature of practical reasoning, the value and the objects of pleasure, the different forms of friendship and the relationship between individual virtue, society and the State. Aristotle's work has had a lasting influence on all subsequent Western thought about ethical matters.

    Translated by J. A. K. Thomson
    Revised with Notes and Appendices by Hugh Tredennick
    Introduction and Bibliography by Jonathan Barnes

Jonathan Barnes is Professor of Ancient Philosophy at the University of Geneva. He has held visiting posts at the University of Chicago, at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst and at the University of Texas. He was also a fellow of Oriel College, Oxford. His publications include The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle (1995), and The PreSocreatic Philosophers (1979).

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