Books

Three Russian Fairy Tales

Alexander Pushkin (and others)

Alexander Pushkin, Russia's greatest poet, was fascinated by Russia's folk history, adapting its fairy tales into captivating poetic versions. In the early twentieth century, the book illustrator Ivan Bilibin likewise fell under the spell of Old Russia, drawing on both folk motifs and art nouveau to produce beautiful illustrations to accompany Pushkin's poems. This irresistible new edition presents three of Pushkin's fairy tales - 'Tsar Saltan', 'A Fisherman and a Little Fish' and 'The Golden Cockerel' - in versions by the acclaimed translator Antony Wood, alongside Bilibin's sumptuous original illustrations. The result is an enchanting window into Russian poetry, fairy tales and magic.

Novels, Tales, Journeys

Alexander Pushkin (and others)

Pushkin's masterpieces in prose, in sparkling new translations by the award-winning Pevear and Volokhonsky.

The father of Russian literature, Pushkin is beloved not only for his poetry but also for his brilliant stories, which range from dramatic narratives of love, obsession and betrayal to lively comic tales, and from satirical epistolary tales to imaginative historical fiction. This volume includes all Pushkin's prose in brilliant new translations, including his masterpieces 'The Queen of Spades', 'The Tales of the Late Ivan Petrovich Belkin' and the short novel 'The Captain's Daughter', which has been called the most perfect book in Russian literature.

The Queen of Spades

Alexander Pushkin

'Hermann waited for the appointed hour like a tiger trembling for its prey.'

One of Pushkin's most popular and chilling stories, 'The Queen of Spades' tells of a young man who develops a dangerous obsession in pursuit of the wealth he craves.

One of 46 new books in the bestselling Little Black Classics series, to celebrate the first ever Penguin Classic in 1946. Each book gives readers a taste of the Classics' huge range and diversity, with works from around the world and across the centuries - including fables, decadence, heartbreak, tall tales, satire, ghosts, battles and elephants.

Eugene Onegin

Alexander Pushkin (and others)

Eugene Onegin is the master work of the poet whom Russians regard as the fountainhead of their literature. Set in 1820s Russia, Pushkin's verse novel follows the fates of three men and three women. Engaging, full of suspense, and varied in tone, it contains a large cast of characters and offers the reader many literary, philosophical, and autobiographical digressions, often in a highly satirical vein. Eugene Onegin was Pushkin's own favourite work, and this new translation by Stanley Mitchell conveys the literal sense and the poetic music of the original.

The Queen of Spades and Other Stories

Alexander Pushkin (and others)

The Queen of Spades, one of his most popular and chilling short stories, tells of an inveterate card player who develops a dangerous obsession with the secret of an old lady's luck, which he believes will bring him the wealth he craves. The Negro of Peter the Great, a story based on the life Pushkin's own great-grandfather, is a vivid depiction - and criticism - of both French and Russian society, while Dubrovsky is the Byronic tale of a dispossessed young officer. The Captain's Daughter tells of a young man sent to military service - based on the actual events of the rebellion against Catherine II, it demonstrates Pushkin's unparalleled skill at blending fiction and history. Together these four stories display the versatility and innovation that earned Pushkin his reputation as a master of prose and established him as the towering figure in Russian literature.

Eugene Onegin

Alexander Pushkin

This novel in verse, said to be the parent of all Russian novels, is a tragic story of innocence, love and friendship. Eugene Onegin, an aristocrat, much like Pushkin and his peers in his attitude and habits, is bored. He visits the countryside where the young and passionate Tatyana falls in love with him. In a touching letter she confesses her love but is cruelly rejected. Years later, it is Onegin's turn to be rejected by Tatyana.

The Collected Stories

Alexander Pushkin

The new expanded Everyman edition of Pushkin's prose fiction contains all his mature work. In addition to 'The Captain's Daughter' and 'The Tales of Belkin', the volume now includes many more short pieces and 'The History of Pugachev', a vivid account of an eighteenth-century Russian rebellion. Pushkin's prose tales are the foundation stones of Russian literature. They made possible the great achievements of Dostosvsky, Tolstoy and Chekhov. But they are also, of course, brilliant and fascinating in their own right. At this volume makes clear, Pushkins is one of the world's great story-tellers' direct, dramatic, tender, with the author 's voices always peruasively present. Paul Debreceny's highly acclaimed translation was first published in 1983. The Everyman edition is published to coincide with the Bicentenary of Pushkin's birth on 26th May 1999.

Tales of Belkin and Other Prose Writings

Alexander Pushkin (and others)

Alexander Pushkin was Russia's first true literary genius. Best known for his poetry, he also wrote sparkling prose that revealed his national culture with elegance and understated humour. Here, his gift for portraying the Russian people is fully revealed. The Tales of Belkin, his first prose masterpiece, presents a series of interlinked stories narrated by a good-hearted Russian squire - among them 'The Shot', in which a duel is revisited after many years, and the grotesque 'The Undertaker'. Elsewhere, works such as the novel-fragment Roslavlev and the Egyptian Nights, the tale of an Italian balladeer seeking an audience in St. Petersberg, demonstrate the wide range of Pushkin's fiction. A Journey to Arzrum, the final piece in this collection, offers an autobiographical account of Pushkin's own experiences in the 1829 war between Russia and Turkey, and remains one of the greatest of all pieces of journalistic adventure writing.

Biography

Alexander Pushkin was born in Moscow in 1799. He was exiled for his liberal views on serfdom and autocracy, but this allowed him the freedom to write some of his greatest works, including the novel in verse Eugene Onegin. He died in 1837 after being fatally wounded in a duel.