Books

Bradley Wiggins: My Hour

Bradley Wiggins

One man, one bike, one hour. The inside story of Bradley Wiggins's record-breaking ride

For 60 minutes this summer, the British public stopped what they were doing, switched on their radios, their TVs, refreshed their Twitter feeds and followed Bradley Wiggins’s attempt to break one of sport’s most gruelling records: The Hour.

The premise is simple enough: how far can you cycle in one hour. But it is thought to be one of the toughest events an athlete can endure, both physically and psychologically. Eddy Merckx, cycling’s über-champ, called it the hardest thing he ever did. Wiggins, like many before him, discovered the unique pain of pushing yourself as hard as you can for 60 minutes.

In this revealing book, Bradley Wiggins takes you behind the scenes of his record attempt. From planning to preparation, to training to execution, Bradley shares his thoughts on his sacrifices, his heroes, and the people who have supported him along the way as well as what’s to come as he heads towards the twilight of his stellar career.

Supported by stunning photography, My Hour is a fitting celebration of one of Britain’s best-loved sportsmen in his finest hour.

Bradley Wiggins: My Time

Bradley Wiggins

On 22 July 2012 Bradley Wiggins made history as the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France. Ten days later at the London Olympic Games he won the time trial to become his country’s most decorated Olympian. In an instant ‘Wiggo’, the kid from Kilburn, was a national hero.

Two years previously, however, Wiggins had been staring into the abyss. His much-hyped attempt to conquer the 2010 Tour de France had ended in public humiliation. Poor results and indifferent form left him facing the sack from Team Sky. And then he was hit with the tragic news of the death of his granddad, George, the man who had raised him as a young boy. At rock bottom, Wiggins had to reach deep inside himself and find the strength to fight his way back.

Outspoken, honest, intelligent and fearless, Wiggins has been hailed as the people’s champion. In My Time he tells the story of the remarkable journey that led him from his lowest ebb to win the world’s toughest race. In his own words he reveals the personal anguish that has driven him on and what it’s like behind the scenes at Team Sky: the brutal training regimes, the sacrifices and his views on his teammates and rivals. He talks too about his anger at the spectre of doping that pursues his sport, how he dealt with the rush of taking Olympic gold and above all what it takes to be the greatest.

Bradley Wiggins: My Time

Bradley Wiggins

On 22 July 2012 Bradley Wiggins made history as the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France. Ten days later at the London Olympic Games he won gold in the time trial to become his country’s most decorated Olympian. In an instant ‘Wiggo’, the kid from Kilburn, was a national hero.

Outspoken, honest, intelligent and fearless, Wiggins has been hailed as the people’s champion. From his lowest ebb following a catastrophic attempt to conquer the 2012 Tour and the loss of his granddad who had raised him as a boy, My Time tells the story of his remarkable journey to win the world's toughest race.

INCLUDES A BRAND NEW CHAPTER
SHORTLISTED FOR THE BRITISH SPORTS BOOK AWARD FOR BEST AUTOBIOGRAPHY

Bradley Wiggins: My Story

Bradley Wiggins

In 2012, Bradley Wiggins became the first ever British cyclist to win the Tour de France. Ten days later he became Britain’s most decorated Olympian.

Follow ‘Wiggo’ on his remarkable journey from childhood to cycling champion, national hero and knighthood.

Contains fascinating facts, maps, diagrams and full-colour photographs

Biography

Sir Bradley Wiggins grew up in Kilburn in London. He won the World Junior Pursuit title before going on to win seven Olympic medals including four golds spanning four games, and seven World Track Championship titles. In 2012 he became the first Briton to win the Tour de France. He was awarded the OBE in the 2005 New Year’s honours list and the CBE in 2009, before being knighted in 2012. He currently lives in the north-west of England with his wife, Cath and their two children Ben and Isabella.