Books

Jim

Hilaire Belloc (and others)

Award-winning illustrator Mini Grey turns her inimitable hand to Hilaire Belloc's classic cautionary tale of Jim: who ran away from his Nurse and was eaten by a Lion!

First published in 1907, Belloc's wickedly funny poem describing the sad end of Jim is fabulously illustrated in a magical picture book edition. This is darkly comic, word of warning about the dangers of being spoiled is the perfect tongue-in-cheek corrective for little ones who have been a little overindulged!

Weekend Wodehouse

P.G. Wodehouse (and others)

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY HILAIRE BELLOC

In the course of a career that encompassed nearly one hundred novels and short story collections (written over more than seventy years), P.G. Wodehouse established himself as not only a fond satirist of the foppish upper class, but one of the greatest comic voices in all literature.

Including stories featuring all his finest creations, including Jeeves, Lord Emsworth of Blandings, Ukridge and the disreputable members of the Drones club, this collection is an ideal introduction to the writer described by Douglas Adams as ‘the greatest comic writer ever’.

Cautionary Tales

Hilaire Belloc

These classic tales of Awful Warnings about the consequences of Bad Behaviour are among the best of comic verse ever written for children. 'Designed for the Admonition of children between the ages of eight and fourteen years', they were first published in 1907; though such eccentricity as Henry King's chewing string may no longer be a common misdemeanour, the humour is perennial and continues to entertained generations of children and their parents. This edition includes New Cautionary Tales, first published in 1930, and illustrated by Nicholas Bentley, who replaced as collaborator the poet's friend Lord Basil Blackwood (B. T. B. ) after his death in World War I.

Cautionary Verses

Hilaire Belloc (and others)

This omnibus of Belloc's stories is a feast of delightful tales told in rhyme - all with a dramatic moral twist in the tail. Are you prone to pulling faces, telling tales or bouts of extravagance? Yes? Then ignore these stories at your peril. If not, you might suffer a fate similar to those described in these cautionary tales.

Complete Verse

Hilaire Belloc (and others)

Here is the distinctly surreal world of Henry King, who perished through his 'chief defect' of chewing little bits of string; of dishonest Matilda whose dreadful lies led her to death by burning; and of Godolphin Horne who 'held the human race in scorn' and ended as the boy 'who blacks the boots at the Savoy'.

Here too are the beautiful lyrics of longing and loss; the sonnets and epigrams; the hugely enjoyable Bad Child's Book of Beasts - not to mention More Beasts for Worse Children; and The Modern Traveller, one of the finest satirical poems in English.

Complete Verse reveals all of Hilaire Belloc's dazzling range and makes plain why he is one of the most truly popular poets of modern times.

Biography

Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (always known as ‘Plum’) wrote more than ninety novels and some three hundred short stories over 73 years. He is widely recognised as the greatest 20th-century writer of humour in the English language.

Perhaps best known for the escapades of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Wodehouse also created the world of Blandings Castle, home to Lord Emsworth and his cherished pig, the Empress of Blandings. His stories include gems concerning the irrepressible and disreputable Ukridge; Psmith, the elegant socialist; the ever-so-slightly-unscrupulous Fifth Earl of Ickenham, better known as Uncle Fred; and those related by Mr Mulliner, the charming raconteur of The Angler’s Rest, and the Oldest Member at the Golf Club.

In 1936 he was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for ‘having made an outstanding and lasting contribution to the happiness of the world’. He was made a Doctor of Letters by Oxford University in 1939 and in 1975, aged 93, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. He died shortly afterwards, on St Valentine’s Day.