Reviews

  • The attraction of the walks, even if you've never read the books, is that they take you through some of the most interesting and often least touristy parts of this always fascinating city

    Mail on Sunday
  • Throughout this guide, the native view is constantly being set against the tourist view, with Brunettis' own favourite coffee and wine bars, far from the tourist melee, getting a mention. What this book also shows though, is not just the beauty of a city, but the literary opportunities it offers. As has been noted before, the city in a long-running detective series virtually becomes a character on its own, playing a pivotal role in the detecting and solving of crime, and Brunetti's Venice is no exception . . . A sense of intimacy is a feature travel guides struggles to manufacture; this kind of detective guide to a place is intimate from the beginning. Even those unfamiliar with Leon's Brunetti books will succumb to being shown a city by one of its own who loves it in spite of all its corruption and crime, tourist paraphernalia and ignorant crowds.

    Herald
  • For lovers of the city Sepeda will take her place alongside Jan Morris, John Julius Norwich and JG Links, who wrote an inimitable celebration of pedestrian Venice, Venice for Pleasure

    Daily Telegraph

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