Reviews

  • "No other contemporary novelist has such <b>supreme mastery</b> of that sweet spot between high and low, <b>literary and compulsively readable</b> as Kate Atkinson. I look forward to a new Atkinson book like I look forward to Christmas…what lends the novel enchantment is that patented Atkinson double whammy: gravity and levity. Tragedy and comedy as so skilfully entwined that you find yourself snorting with mirth…brimming with dark wit that <b>reminds you how deeply satisfying good fiction can be</b>."

    Sunday Telegraph
  • "Transcription stands alongside its immediate predecessors as a<b> fine</b> example of Kate Atkinson's mature work, an unapologetic novel of ideas which is also<b> wise, funny and paced like a thriller</b>."

    Observer
  • "<b>Superb</b>...<i>Transcription </i>is the sort of book that reminds you how <b>profound and satisfying and moving</b> and <b>exhilarating</b> good fiction can be. It’s the best novel I’ve read all year. I can’t praise it enough."

    Irish Times
  • "Never loses its sense of absurdity of human beings even in their most tragic or noble moments...How vehemently most novelists will wish to produce a<b> masterpiece</b> as good."

    Daily Telegraph
  • "On a graph plotting the literary qualities versus saleability of contemporary British novelists, Kate Atkinson would surely occupy <b>the highest point</b> where the two meet...There are plenty of twists and turns in this <b>terrific page</b>-<b>turner</b>, some shocking moments, and a narrator whom the author encourages us to love."

    Evening Standard
  • "Atkinson handles her mazy, <b>Le Carre-style plot </b>with complete authority. But there’s a lot more to the novel than its <b>page-turning t</b>hrills. The increasingly sceptical Juliet makes for a very appealing heroine and the darker material is interspersed with some <b>neat comedy</b>. Above all, Atkinson recreates the atmosphere of both wartime and post-war London with utter conviction."

    Reader's Digest
  • "[A] <b>superb</b> story of wartime espionage...<b>Hilary Mantel </b>once said of Atkinson's ground-breaking first novel that she had a "game-plan <b>more sophisticated than Dickens</b>", and that skill is more than evident in this latest offering...<b>remarkable..</b>.Transcription is a fine course in the art of deception. The<b> sheer bravura</b> of Atkinson's storytelling is such that you will find it impossible not to want to revisit those clues so cleverly placed, as you shake your head in disbelief at how effortlessly you have been taken in."

    Times Literary Supplement
  • "A new Kate Atkinson novel is always a reason to rejoice and <i>Transcription</i> was everything I was hoping for and more…The truly <b>surprising denouement </b>makes for one of the best conclusions of a novel I’ve ever read.I immediately wanted to<b> read it all over again.</b>"

    Red
  • "Kate Atkinson’s fluid identity as a novelist has long marked her out as one of Britain’s <b>most interesting</b> – and often underrated – writers…the <b>playful</b> always stands shoulder to shoulder with the painful, the grandiose with the grubby…Atkinson’s depiction of espionage and counter-espionage on the Home Front is <b>nimble and convincing</b>…But there is an <b>immensely serious</b> book here too, waiting in the wings to reveal itself on the very last pages; a book that asks us to question the entertainment we’ve just gobbled up, and to reckon with what lies beneath it."

    New Statesman
  • "A <b>treat</b> - cerebral and suspenseful, playful and empathetic."

    Mail on Sunday
  • "This is a novel about identity in which no one and nothing is exactly as they seem - a spy novel, in short... Terms such as "postmodern" and "metafiction" seem far too heavy for novels as <b>enjoyable</b> as Atkinson's, but from Behind the Scenes onwards she has been chipping away at the fourth wall, and mischievously drawing attention to her craft. What elevates her fiction above mere playfulness is the <b>emotional integrity</b> of her characters... Atkinson always puts on a<b> damn good show</b>."

    Guardian
  • "A <b>triumph</b>...inventive, atmospheric and <b>witty.</b>"

    Good Housekeeping
  • "Full of intrigue...sublimely <b>suspenseful </b>- <b>droll,devious and deadly</b>, beautifully serious."

    Sunday Express
  • "In <i>Transcription, </i>Kate Atkinson recasts the <i>bildungsroman</i> within the fertile genre of the spy thriller… …As the plot of this <b>accomplished</b> novel hurtles towards its <b>astonishing denouement</b>, even the canniest reader may feel wrong-footed."

    Literary Review
  • "This i<b>ntricate and captivating</b> novel is a treat. Our advice? Cancel your plans and get lost in its pages."

    Heat
  • "Intricate, compelling, unpredictable…a <b>gripping</b> spy story …filled with the mystery, humour, and Britishness we have come to expect."

    Stylist
  • "Murky, <b>mysterious</b> and with double bluffs,divided loyalties and untrustworthy narratives aplenty, Atkinson explores the nature of truth in this<b> vibrant </b>piece of historical fiction."

    Psychologies
  • "Atkinson’s poker-faced narration perfectly serves a <b>twisty</b> tale of innocence lost amid a fog of geopolitical double-dealing, framed with a deadly tragedy."

    Metro
  • "Totally <b>gripping </b>and <b>extremely funny</b>, with an excellent joke on practically every page...There won't be a better or more <b>enjoyable </b>book published this year."

    The Oldie