Reviews

  • "[Thompson-Spires] writes satire of the Paul Beatty school, her humour as <b>daring as it is disarming</b>. This is a <b>firecracker</b> of a book, sizzling with politics, but it's also <b>a triumph of storytelling: intelligent, acerbic and ingenious</b>"

    Financial Times
  • "Every so often, a voice comes along that <b>knocks you sideways</b>; this debut collection of short stories was one such moment. From the first page <b>there’s an electricity and freshness to the voice that grabbed hold of me and wouldn’t let me go</b>"

    Observer
  • "<b>Witty, mischievous</b>... These <b>coolly ironic and grimly funny</b> tales brim with <b>snap and verve</b>, and this is a debut collection of <b>daring and aplomb</b><b> </b>"

    The Guardian
  • "The kind of collection that makes you<b> shake your head in deligh</b>t. Her voice is <b>fresh-laundry-clean</b>: <b>I have not read anything like it in years</b>. The prose is <b>cunning</b>. It appears simple, but the overall effect is <b>powerful</b>. Her stories feel simultaneously like the poke of a stick and a comforting balm; a smack followed by a kiss. <b>I’m so into it.</b>"

    Guardian
  • "[Thompson-Spires] writes with <b>complete control</b>, building a story in <b>the precise shape of her anger</b>. Her sentences <b>intertwine and double back</b> on themselves, and each one <b>stings</b>"

    Guardian
  • "Her electric style is <b>extrovert, erudite and hugely entertaining</b>, despite the often grim subject matter... Thompson-Spires <b>invigoratingly hits the mark</b>... you end the collection greedy to read whatever is coming next from this <b>unmistakable talent</b>"

    The Observer
  • "<p>Thompson-Spires' stories are dark, have <b>a cutting sense of humour</b>, and are <b>entertaining and essential</b><br><b></b></p>"

    Stylist
  • "For <b>the freshest voice in literature</b>, look no further than Nafissa Thompson-Spires <b>blisteringly clever</b> short story collection, <i>Heads of the Colored People</i>… Sometimes, a voice comes around that is <b>so singular, so funny, so wholly original</b>, that you go back and reread each story once you finish it… In each of these <b>humorous, intelligent</b> vignettes, Thompson-Spires explores aspects of being Black and middle-class in today’s America. <b>This is a special collection. Buy it so you can read it more than once</b>"

    Refinery29
  • "<b>Superbly witty</b>... The topics she takes on are often deadly serious, but every story flashes grim humor. She is also a <b>brutally sharp</b> observer"

    New York Times
  • "<b>Intricate, playful</b>... Thompson-Spires crafts a narrative voice which always walks one step ahead, sometimes turning to us with a wink, before getting back to what really needs to be said... The minutiae of her characters’ lives are <b>a joy to read</b> for the purity of the unremarkable, and yet there is nothing light about her subject matter. Thompson-Spires’ juxtaposing of small normalities against larger, more crippling truths powerfully draws attention to the oppressively racialised realities of her characters’ lives... <b>A much longed-for portrayal of a black normality</b>"

    The White Review
  • "Nafissa Thompson-Spires <b>pulls no punches</b> in her <b>boundary-pushing</b> short-story collection ... With <b>gallows humour and brazen originality</b>, the author plunges us deep into the interiorities of quirkily indelible characters ... <b>Thompson-Spires's virtuosity is breathtaking</b> ... <b>Funny, smart and of the moment, this electrifying debut marks the emergence of a daring talent</b>"

    O Magazine
  • "<b>Every once in a while a book comes around that fills a need — that communicates ideas so effectively and humanely its social value leaps off the page. <i>Heads</i></b><b>, the debut of Nafissa Thompson-Spires, is such a book</b> ... Stories run the gamut from <b>intimate to uproarious to devastating</b> ... Writing in versatile prose and with a penchant for naturalistic dialogue...<b>she weaves timeless human conflict into a quietly political tapestry</b>."

    Entertainment Weekly