Reviews

  • Showing Osborne at the height of his powers, The Glass Kingdom upends the Western reader's most basic assumptions about the human world . . . stylish and disquieting

    John Gray, New Statesman
  • The author's exceptional descriptive skills fuel an overwhelming sense of menace . . . the next day you will still be thinking of Sarah's fate with horror

    Louise Doughty, New York Times
  • An atmospheric, gripping novel . . . a horror-satire of globalised capital in which money might buy you idle time or the semblance of power, but it also makes you a target. The Kingdom's residents are blind to its fragility until it is almost too late: as apt a metaphor for 2020 as a novel could hope to provide

    Ed Cumming, i
  • Bangkok is the star of this accomplished novel. Its denizens are aliens to themselves, glittering on the horizon of their own lives, moving - restless and rootless and afraid - though a cityscape that has more stories than they know

    Hilary Mantel
  • Bewitching

    Geoffrey Wheatcroft, Daily Mail
  • Osborne, who specialises in stories about hapless Westerners coming a cropper in foreign lands, has another hit on his hands with this sinister, sensuous and wonderfully evocative tale

    Katie Law, Evening Standard
  • Osborne handles surface and depth with immense skill, as only great writers can do

    Deborah Levy, Financial Times
  • Osborne writes mercilessly, savagely well. He excavates his characters . . . with a pathologist's precision

    Daily Mail
  • If the purpose of a novel is to take you away from the everyday and show you something different, then Osborne is succeeding, and handsomely

    Lee Child
  • The bastard child of Graham Greene and Patricia Highsmith

    Metro

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