New and forthcoming

Heritage

Vita Sackville-West

Ruth Pennistan is a farmer’s daughter, born and brought up in Kent. But her dark hair and eyes belie a forgotten ancestry - a Spanish gypsy grandmother and a passionate inheritance. Malory, the rather straight-laced guest of the family, falls head over heels in love, even whilst Ruth becomes trapped against her will in a drama of love and tragedy with another man. Vita Sackville-West’s first heroine echoes the passions and contradictions of the author's own life.

Family History

Vita Sackville-West

Evelyn, aged thirty-nine, is an attractive widow living an irreproachable life. Then she meets Miles, fifteen years her junior, and falls passionately in love. But both lovers have strong personalities and passion does not equal happiness. Evelyn, deeply jealous and conventional is shocked at her lover's casual ways and his insistence on working all day. Miles’s love for Evelyn is real but he cannot devote himself wholly to her whims. Vita Sackville-West collides attitudes to work, sex and society in the changing world of the early 1930s.

The Forty Days of Musa Dagh

Franz Werfel

Franz Werfel's masterpiece tells the true story of the inhabitants of six Armenian villages on the mountain of Musa Dagh, who choose to defy the deportation order of the Turkish government and are subsequently besieged on the mountainside. Told through the eyes of Gabriel Bagradian, a cosmopolitan Armenian who has returned to his home village with his French wife and son after years living in Europe, the novel is a rich and dramatic epic that powerfully argues for the value of resistance even in impossible circumstances.

Paradise Lost & Paradise Regained

John Milton (and others)

A BBC Radio 4 dramatisation of Milton's epic poem telling the story of the fall of man, and also its sequel, "Paradise Regained".

First published in 1667, Paradise Lost describes Satan's plot to ruin God's new and most favoured creation, Mankind, and recounts the temptation of Adam and Eve and their banishment from the Garden of Eden.

Paradise Regained, published in 1671, tells of the temptation of Christ by Satan as he wanders in the wilderness for forty days and nights.

The cast includes Dennis Quilley as Milton, Ian McDiarmid as Satan and Robert Glenister as Christ.

Full cast:
Milton: Denis Quilley
Satan: Ian McDiarmid
Christ: Robert Glenister
Raphael: John Rowe
God: Godfrey Kenton
Adam: Linus Roache
Michael: Mark Straker
Abdiel/Andrew: Julian Rhind-Tutt
Nisroc: John Church
Simon/Angel: Matthew Morgan
Belial: Steve Hodson
Angel: David Thorpe

Metamorphosis

Franz Kafka (and others)

Benedict Cumberbatch reads the enduring classic of man-turned-insect in Franz Kafka’s Metamorphosis.
Gregor Samsa, wakes to discover that he has turned into a large, monstrous insect-like creature. Gregor attempts to adjust to his new condition as he deals with being burdensome to his parents and sister, who are repelled by the horrible, verminous creature he has become.
First published in 1915, Kafka’s darkly comic novella explores concepts such as the absurdity of life, alienation and the disconnect between mind and body.

The Happy Reader – Issue 10

Penguin Classics

For avid readers and the uninitiated alike, this is a chance to reengage with classic literature and to stay inspired and entertained.

The concept of the magazine is simple: the first half is a long-form interview with a notable book fanatic and the second half explores one classic work of literature from an array of surprising and invigorating angles.

In The Happy Reader 10, our summer classic is Yevgeny Zamyatin's We

Kalevala

Elias Lonnrot

Kalevala is the poetic name for Finland: ‘the land of heroes’. Here you’ll find the cultural essence of a young country but an old land, the stories, songs and poems that recount the mythical adventures of humankind. Ambition, lust, romance, birth and death can all be found within its pages, as well as the sampo, a mysterious talisman that brings great happiness to its possessor and over which great battles will be fought.

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY HORATIO CLARE

Goodbye to All Cats

P.G. Wodehouse

‘Cheaper and more effective than Valium’.1

Offers ‘relief from anxiety, raginess or an afternoon-long tendency towards the sour’.2

‘Read when you’re well and when you’re poorly; when you’re travelling, and when you’re not; when you’re feeling clever, and when you’re feeling utterly dim.’3

Whatever your mood, P. G. Wodehouse, widely acknowledged to be ‘the best English comic novelist of the century’4, is guaranteed to lift your spirits.

Why? Because ‘Mr Wodehouse’s idyllic world can never stale. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.’5

How? ‘You don’t analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.’6

1 Olivia Williams 2 Caitlin Moran 3 Lynne Truss 4 Sebastian Faulks 5 Evelyn Waugh 6 Stephen Fry

Ever on the lookout for a quick buck, a solid gold fortune, or at least a plausible little scrounge, the irrepressible Ukridge gives con men a bad name. Looking like an animated blob of mustard in his bright yellow raincoat, he invests time, passion and energy (but seldom actual cash) in a series of increasingly bizarre money-making schemes. Shares in an accident syndicate? Easily arranged. Finance for a dog college? It's yours.

And if you throw in some cats, flying unexpectedly from windows, and a young man trying ever-more-desperately to impress the family of his latest love, you get a medley of Wodehouse delights in which lunacy and comic exuberance reign supreme.

Contents:
- Goodbye to All Cats
- Ukridge's Dog College
- Ukridge's Accident Syndicate

Mulliner’s Buck-U-Uppo

P.G. Wodehouse

‘Cheaper and more effective than Valium’.1

Offers ‘relief from anxiety, raginess or an afternoon-long tendency towards the sour’.2

‘Read when you’re well and when you’re poorly; when you’re travelling, and when you’re not; when you’re feeling clever, and when you’re feeling utterly dim.’3

Whatever your mood, P. G. Wodehouse, widely acknowledged to be ‘the best English comic novelist of the century’4, is guaranteed to lift your spirits.

Why? Because ‘Mr Wodehouse’s idyllic world can never stale. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.’5

How? ‘You don’t analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.’6

1 Olivia Williams 2 Caitlin Moran 3 Lynne Truss 4 Sebastian Faulks 5 Evelyn Waugh 6 Stephen Fry

Contents:
- Mulliner’s Buck-u-uppo
- The Spot of Art
- Strychnine in the Soup

The Smile that Wins

P.G. Wodehouse

‘Cheaper and more effective than Valium’.1

Offers ‘relief from anxiety, raginess or an afternoon-long tendency towards the sour’.2

‘Read when you’re well and when you’re poorly; when you’re travelling, and when you’re not; when you’re feeling clever, and when you’re feeling utterly dim.’3

Whatever your mood, P. G. Wodehouse, widely acknowledged to be ‘the best English comic novelist of the century’4, is guaranteed to lift your spirits.

Why? Because ‘Mr Wodehouse’s idyllic world can never stale. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.’5

How? ‘You don’t analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.’6

1 Olivia Williams 2 Caitlin Moran 3 Lynne Truss 4 Sebastian Faulks 5 Evelyn Waugh 6 Stephen Fry

Contents:
- The Smile that Wins
- Jeeves and the Song of Songs
- The Great Sermon Handicap

Virginia Woolf's greatest works

The Isokon Donkey

A true Penguin classic

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