New and forthcoming

Eskiboy

Wiley

‘Wiley is Wiley, and if you don’t know me, you don’t know much.



*Winner of the NME Best Music Book Award 2018*

A TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR
A SUNDAY TIMES BOOK OF THE YEAR
A TELEGRAPH BOOK OF THE YEAR

'The greatest UK MC of all time' Noisey

Wiley. Godfather of grime. He's one of Britain's most innovative musicians – and the movement he started in east London in the early 2000s is taking over the world.

This is his story. This is ESKIBOY.

'Perhaps the most influential musician working in Britain today' Guardian

'Wiley is the pioneering force of grime, the most revolutionary musical movement in Britain since punk' The Times

'A glimpse of the 21st-century rock'n'roll' Sunday Times

Damaged Goods

Oliver Shah

'Superb' Evening Standard

'From the glitzy parties to the threatening phone calls, the larger-than-life characters to the speedy downfall, this real-life tale of hubris has all the elements of a Greek tragedy' City AM

'Entertaining stuff, pacily written. Filled with colourful characters - and expletives' The Times

'Shah has written a hard-hitting, often funny, ultimately sobering tale of how fortunes were made and lost in late 20th and early 21st century Britain' Financial Times

'A detailed and entertaining dismantling of the 'king of the high street'' Guardian

'Some stupid f*cking book' Sir Philip Green

In this jaw-dropping expose, Oliver Shah uncovers the truth behind one of Britain's biggest business scandals, following Sir Philip Green's journey to the big time, the wild excesses of his heyday and his dramatic demise.

Sir Philip Green was once hailed one of Britain's best businessmen. As chairman of Arcadia Group, home to brands such as Topshop, Dorothy Perkins and Miss Selfridge, Green had prime ministers and supermodels on speed dial. But the retail magnate's reputation came crashing down when Shah, a Sunday Times journalist, uncovered the methods Green used to amass his gigantic offshore fortune, and the desperation that drove his doomed BHS deal.

In 2015, Green sold British Home Stores for £1 to Retail Acquisitions, owned by Dominic Chappell, a charlatan who siphoned off BHS's remaining millions before filing for administration. By the time it went under in April 2016, BHS had debts of £1.3bn, including a pension deficit of £571m. Its collapse left 11,000 employees without jobs and 20,000 pension fund members facing the loss of their benefits, prompting the government to launch an inquiry into Green's sale of the company. While one of Britain's oldest department stores boarded up its shop fronts, former employees and shoppers protested in the streets and MPs rallied in parliament, demanding Green be stripped of his knighthood. The furore over the sale subsided in 2017 when Green agreed a £363m deal with the Pensions Regulator, but with revelations surrounding Topshop's pension deficit now surfacing, could tragedy strike again?

Oliver Shah is the award-winning Business Editor of the Sunday Times and one of the most respected national commentators on business and the high street. He was named business journalist of the year at both the Press Awards and London Press Club Awards in 2017 for his investigation into Sir Philip Green. Shah studied English at Cambridge University and journalism at City University before joining City AM in 2009 and the Sunday Times in 2010. Aged 34, Shah lives in east London.

In Montparnasse

Sue Roe

***As heard on BBC Radio 4's Book of the Week***

Witness the birth of Surrealism in Sue Roe's lively account of the artists who lived, loved and worked together

In this entertaining and informative biography, Sue Roe illustrates how surrealism emerged in Paris amidst an artistic ambience of lively experimentation. Before surrealism made its startling impact, artists including Marcel Duchamp and Giorgio De Chirico had already begun to shift the focus of the art scene in Montparnasse. Beginning with Duchamp, Roe tells the story of the wonderfully eccentric and avant-garde Dada movement, the birth of Surrealist photography with Man Ray and his muse Kiki de Montparnasse, the love triangle between writer Paul Éluard, his wife Gala and the artist Max Ernst, until the arrival of Salvador Dalí in 1929. In Montparnasse recounts the extraordinary, revolutionary work these artists undertook as much as the salons, café life, friendships, rows and love affairs that were their background.

'Brings together some of the chief protagonists in one of the 20th century's most inventive art movements. A vivid read' Radio Times

'Highly colourful . . . they're all here, the big names of the time - behaving badly, and, at times, quite madly too' Observer

'Roe is a talented writer' Sunday Times