New and forthcoming

My Puppy's First Year

Ebury Press

Capture and treasure your puppy’s early moments forever.

Every dog has its day – and some have their own book too!

From the first magical walk in the park, to your puppy’s hilarious misadventures and mishaps, this book offers you prompts and cues to record that first wonderful year together. In words and pictures, you can document how your puppy settles in, how he responds to the dreaded B-A-T-H, his favourite food and treats, the journeys you take together and his first Christmas, among many other precious memories that you won’t want to forget. Something you can cherish forever, My Puppy’s First Year is an invaluable record of your early days with your new best friend.

*Please note: this book is for life, not just for Christmas*

My Kitten's First Year

Ebury Press

Your memory book to capture and cherish the first year with your new kitten

‘Time spent with cats is never wasted’ – Sigmund Freud

There’s nothing more special than bringing your kitten home for the first time, watching him explore his new habitat with such simple and playful curiosity! My Kitten’s First Year is your special keepsake to record this magical memory and many more, from his hilarious misadventures and resting positions, to his favourite toys and places to be stroked, and to the first ‘present’ he brings you! With prompts for you to add words and pictures, this is a lasting testament to the wonderful relationship you share with your new kitten.

My Mother's Book

Elma van Vliet

When Elma van Vliet's mother became ill in 2001, she realised there was still so much she wanted to ask her. That's why she created a series of books to help share and preserve precious memories. Since then, more than three million people worldwide have used her books to tell their family's stories.

The Mother's Book is a guided journal that prompts your mother to share her memories, dreams, and wishes, asking her to record everything from her favourite band as a teenager and her childhood games to her proudest accomplishment and her first memory of you. Give it to her as a gift, get it back as a chronicle of her
life. The end result will be a deeply personal keepsake, one that helps you remember what is really important in life: the people we love and the stories we share with one another.

Letters to Milena

Franz Kafka

Franz Kafka's letters to his one-time muse, Milena Jesenska - an intimate window into the desires and hopes of the twentieth-century's most prophetic and important writer

Kafka first made the acquaintance of Milena Jesenska in 1920 when she was translating his early short prose into Czech, and their relationship quickly developed into a deep attachment. Such was his feeling for her that Kafka showed her his diaries and, in doing so, laid bare his heart and his conscience. While at times Milena's 'genius for living' gave Kafka new life, it ultimately exhausted him, and their relationship was to last little over two years. In 1924 Kafka died in a sanatorium near Vienna, and Milena died in 1944 at the hands of the Nazis, leaving these letters as a moving record of their relationship.

Samuel Pepys: The Diaries

Samuel Pepys (and others)

When Samuel Pepys (1633–1703) began writing in 1660 he was a young clerk living in London, struggling to pay his rent. Over the next nine years as he kept his journal, he rose to be a powerful naval administrator. He became eyewitness to some of the most significant events in seventeenth-century English history, among them, the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660 (he was in the ship that brought back Charles II from exile), the plague that ravaged the capital in 1665, and the Great Fire of 1666, described with poetry and horror.
Pepys's diary gives vivid descriptions of spectacular events, but much of the richness of the diary lies in the details it provides about the minor dramas of daily life. While Pepys was keen to hear the King's views, he was also ready to talk with a soldier, a housekeeper, or a child rag-picker. He records with searing frankness his tumultuous personal and professional life: the pleasures and frustrations of his marriage, together with his infidelities, his ambitions, and his power schemes. All of this was set down in shorthand, to protect it from prying eyes. The result is a lively, often astonishing, diary and an unrivalled account of life in seventeenth-century London.

From the Corner of the Oval Office

Beck Dorey-Stein

The compulsively readable, behind-the-scenes memoir that takes readers inside the Obama White House, through the eyes of a young staffer learning the ropes, falling in love and finding her place in the world.

'Who knew the West Wing could be so sexy? Beck’s unparalleled access is obvious on every page, along with her knife-sharp humour... Lots of books claim to give real insider glimpses, but this one actually delivers.'
Lauren Weisberger, author of The Devil Wears Prada

In 2012, Beck Dorey-Stein was just scraping by in Washington DC when a posting on Craigslist landed her, improbably, in the Oval Office as one of Barack Obama's stenographers. She joined the elite team who accompanied the president wherever he went, recorder and mic in hand. On whirlwind trips across time zones, Beck forged friendships with a tight group of fellow travellers - young men and women who, like her, left their real lives behind to hop aboard Air Force One in service of the president. But as she learned the ropes of protocol, Beck became romantically entangled with a colleague, and suddenly, the political became all too personal.

Set against the backdrop of a White House full of glamour, drama and intrigue, this is the story of a young woman making unlikely friendships, getting her heart broken, learning what truly matters and discovering her voice in the process.

In the Garden of the Fugitives

Ceridwen Dovey

A literary tour-de-force of power, guilt and obsession - two people stalk each other through the shadowy, tangled web of the past - man and woman caught in a dangerous game of confession, each partly predator and partly prey...

'It has been almost fifteen years. I've thought about you often, mostly unkindly. But there: I have thought about you.'

Nearly twenty years after Vita broke off contact with Royce, he writes to her, determined to excavate the past. He is older than her, a ghost from her university days, a former benefactor she has tried hard to forget. In his own youth, Royce spent two fateful summers working on a dig in Pompeii with a woman he would later memorialize with a scholarship - the same one that Vita eventually received.

From opposite sides of the world, Royce and Vita enter into an adversarial dance: an attempt to settle old accounts. Profoundly addictive and unsettling, In the Garden of the Fugitives is a thrilling psychological examination of what happens when the lines are blurred between victim and predator, between loyalty and obsession.

Praise for Ceridwen Dovey

'Strange and richly imagined, haunting and atmospheric... [Dovey] unflinchingly illuminates human nature' The New York Times onOnly the Animals

'Painfully beautiful, heartbreaking and riveting... Dovey voices the uncomfortable, she speaks the unspeakable... An ambitious book with a fable-like surface and a whole churning world beneath' Guardian onOnly the Animals

The Collected Works

Anne Frank

Anne Frank's collected works contains all three versions of her famous diary, the stories and essays that Anne Frank wrote while hidden away in the secret annexe as well as all of her known letters, her collection of pleasing phrases from her favourite books, autograph album entries, a family tree and select bibliography.

The definitive guide to Anne Frank's work, The Collected Works includes fascinating introductions to Anne Frank's life and family history, as well as commentaries on the historical context of the diary and its enduring legacy worldwide.

The Long Weekend

Adrian Tinniswood

'A masterpiece of social history' Daily Mail

There is nothing quite as beautiful as an English country house in summer. And there has never been a summer quite like that Indian summer between the two world wars, a period of gentle decline in which the sun set slowly on the British Empire and the shadows lengthened on the lawns of a thousand stately homes.

Real life in the country house during the 1920s and 1930s was not always so sunny. By turns opulent and ordinary, noble and vicious, its shadows were darker. In The Long Weekend, Adrian Tinniswood uncovers the truth about a world half-forgotten, draped in myth and hidden behind stiff upper lips and film-star smiles.

Drawing on hundreds of memoirs, on unpublished letters and diaries, on the eye-witness testimonies of belted earls and unhappy heiresses and bullying butlers, The Long Weekend gives a voice to the people who inhabited this world and shows how the image of the country house was carefully protected by its occupants above and below stairs, and how the reality was so much more interesting than the dream.

Meet Me at the Museum

Anne Youngson

A deep and luminous story of late love and second chances - an enduring novel of ideas about life, love and the surprises it throws at us.

‘Absolutely beautiful, about loss and the life choices we make’ Liz Hoggard, Daily Mail

'Full of grace and humanity' Sunday Times

'Intriguing, tender, unexpectedly moving' Woman and Home

‘A beautiful, affecting novel of late love, by an extraordinary new writer’ NINA STIBBE

'Warm-hearted, clear-minded, and unexpectedly spellbinding, Meet Me at the Museum is a novel to savour' ANNIE BARROWS, co-author of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

'A quirky, wise and tender novel. Proof that the richest fruits come on the edge of autumn' SARAH DUNANT

'Quietly intriguing, beautifully observed, full of powerful emotions' RUTH HOGAN, author of The Keeper of Lost Things

‘Tender, wise and moving, Meet Me at the Museum is a novel to cherish.’ JOHN BOYNE


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Sometimes it takes a stranger to really know who you are


When Tina Hopgood writes a letter of regret to a man she has never met, she doesn’t expect a reply.

When Anders Larsen, a lonely museum curator, answers it, nor does he.

They’re both searching for something, they just don’t know it yet.

Anders has lost his wife, along with his hopes and dreams for the future. Tina is trapped in a marriage she doesn’t remember choosing.

Slowly their correspondence blossoms as they bare their souls to each other with stories of joy, anguish and discovery. But then Tina’s letters suddenly cease, and Anders is thrown into despair.

Can their unexpected friendship survive?

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WHAT READERS ARE SAYING:

'I loved this book. It was so different from anything else I have read'

'I just loved this book and read it in one sitting. There were times when I felt like underlining the sentences that resonated with me'

'I read this book one letter at a time, just to let the contents sink in. Tears came to my eyes'

The Observer Promising first-time British novelists 2018: 'A novel about self-discovery and second chances'

'I thoroughly recommend this book to anyone looking for a book that makes you think and wonder and quietly hope. I loved it' TAMMY COHEN

'Insightful, emotionally acute and absorbing' Daily Express

‘A correspondence that begins with a search for clarity becomes something much deeper and richer - both for the two main characters, and for the reader.
Anne Youngson peels away the layers that prevent us from living the lives we ought to be leading, and her book is both tender and absorbing.’ LISSA EVANS, author of Their Finest Hour and a Half


'Meet Me at the Museum starts so quiet and small like a bud tightly closed against the winter then it unfurls into something so alive and truly beautiful. I was immensely moved by it' TOR UDALL, author of A Thousand Paper Birds

'Precise, clear, funny, poignant and truthful. This is a work of art, dear readers.
Revel in its beauty' ADRIANA TRIGIANI


‘A moving tribute to friendship and love, to the courage of the ordinary, and to starting again’ RACHEL JOYCE


'The loveliest short novel of late love you'll ever read. Whenever I talk about it, I simply cry with joy' JAMES HAWES

'Full of emotion, wisdom and honesty, the story envelops the reader in a celebration of true friendship and an appreciation of the opportunities that life can unexpectedly present. One thing’s for sure, this book makes you realise that life is too short and that the future can be more hopeful than we anticipate.
If you only read one book this year, read this. Highly recommended' Mature Times



The Life of Stuff

Susannah Walker

‘Absolutely fascinating. She writes with admirable honesty… It is a book I know I shall read again’ Ruth Hogan, author of The Keeper of Lost Things

'This extraordinary, beautiful memoir gripped me from the first page... it moved me profoundly' Clover Stroud, author of The Wild Other

Only after her mother’s death does Susannah Walker discover how much of a hoarder she had become. Over the following months, she has to sort through a dilapidated house filled to the brim with rubbish and treasures, in search of a woman she'd never really known or understood in life. This is her last chance to piece together her mother’s story and make sense of their troubled relationship. What emerges from the mess of scattered papers, discarded photographs and an extraordinary amount of stuff is the history of a sad and fractured family, haunted by dead children, divorce and alcohol.

The Life of Stuff is a deeply personal memoir about mourning and the shoring up of possessions against the losses and griefs of life, which also raises universal questions about what makes us the people we are. What do our possessions say about us? Why do we project such meaning onto them? And what painful circumstances turn someone who loves their home and the stuff it contains into an incurable hoarder who ends their days in squalor?

Modern Nature

Derek Jarman

A divine, meditative and inspiring diary of Derek Jarman's famous garden at Dungeness.

'An essential – urgent – book for the 21st Century' Hans Ulrich Obrist

WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY OLIVIA LAING

In 1986 Derek Jarman discovered he was HIV positive and decided to make a garden at his cottage on the barren coast of Dungeness. Facing an uncertain future, he nevertheless found solace in nature, growing all manner of plants. While some perished beneath wind and sea-spray others flourished, creating brilliant, unexpected beauty in the wilderness.

Modern Nature is both a diary of the garden and a meditation by Jarman on his own life: his childhood, his time as a young gay man in the 1960s, his renowned career as an artist, writer and film-maker. It is at once a lament for a lost generation, an unabashed celebration of gay sexuality, and a devotion to all that is living.