New and forthcoming

Letters to Milena

Franz Kafka

Kafka first made the acquaintance of Milena Jesenska in 1920 when she was translating his early short prose into Czech, and their relationship quickly developed into a deep attachment. Such was his feeling for her that Kafka showed her his diaries and, in doing so, laid bare his heart and his conscience. While at times Milena's 'genius for living' gave Kafka new life, it ultimately exhausted him, and their relationship was to last little over two years. In 1924 Kafka died in a sanatorium near Vienna, and Milena died in 1944 at the hands of the Nazis, leaving these letters as a moving record of their relationship.

The Collected Works

Anne Frank

Anne Frank's collected works contains all three versions of her famous diary, the stories and essays that Anne Frank wrote while hidden away in the secret annexe as well as all of her known letters, her collection of pleasing phrases from her favourite books, autograph album entries, a family tree and select bibliography.

The definitive guide to Anne Frank's work, The Collected Works includes fascinating introductions to Anne Frank's life and family history, as well as commentaries on the historical context of the diary and its enduring legacy worldwide.

Meet Me at the Museum

Anne Youngson

The Observer Promising first-time British novelists 2018: 'A novel about self-discovery and second chances'

'Warm-hearted, clear-minded, and unexpectedly spellbinding, Meet Me at the Museum is a novel to savour' ANNIE BARROWS, co-author of The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

‘A beautiful, affecting novel of late love, by an extraordinary new writer’ NINA STIBBE

'A quirky, wise and tender novel. Proof that the richest fruits come on the edge of autumn' SARAH DUNANT

'Quietly intriguing, beautifully observed, full of powerful emotions' RUTH HOGAN, author of The Keeper of Lost Things

‘Tender, wise and moving, Meet Me at the Museum is a novel to cherish.’ JOHN BOYNE

‘A moving tribute to friendship and love, to the courage of the ordinary, and to starting again’ RACHEL JOYCE

'I thoroughly recommend this book to anyone looking for a book that makes you think and wonder and quietly hope. I loved it' TAMMY COHEN

'Insightful, emotionally acute and absorbing' Daily Express

'The loveliest short novel of late love you'll ever read. Whenever I talk about it, I simply cry with joy' JAMES HAWES

‘A correspondence that begins with a search for clarity becomes something much deeper and richer - both for the two main characters, and for the reader.
Anne Youngson peels away the layers that prevent us from living the lives we ought to be leading, and her book is both tender and absorbing.’ LISSA EVANS, author of Their Finest Hour and a Half


'Meet Me at the Museum starts so quiet and small like a bud tightly closed against the winter then it unfurls into something so alive and truly beautiful. I was immensely moved by it' TOR UDALL, author of A Thousand Paper Birds

'Precise, clear, funny, poignant and truthful. This is a work of art, dear readers.
Revel in its beauty' ADRIANA TRIGIANI


Sometimes it takes a stranger to really know who you are


When Tina Hopgood writes a letter of regret to a man she has never met, she doesn’t expect a reply.

When Anders Larsen, a lonely museum curator, answers it, nor does he.

They’re both searching for something, they just don’t know it yet.

Anders has lost his wife, along with his hopes and dreams for the future. Tina is trapped in a marriage she doesn’t remember choosing.

Slowly their correspondence blossoms as they bare their souls to each other with stories of joy, anguish and discovery. But then Tina’s letters suddenly cease, and Anders is thrown into despair.

Can their unexpected friendship survive?

The Life of Stuff

Susannah Walker

‘Absolutely fascinating. She writes with admirable honesty… It is a book I know I shall read again’ Ruth Hogan, author of The Keeper of Lost Things

'This extraordinary, beautiful memoir gripped me from the first page... it moved me profoundly' Clover Stroud, author of The Wild Other

Only after her mother’s death does Susannah Walker discover how much of a hoarder she had become. Over the following months, she has to sort through a dilapidated house filled to the brim with rubbish and treasures, in search of a woman she'd never really known or understood in life. This is her last chance to piece together her mother’s story and make sense of their troubled relationship. What emerges from the mess of scattered papers, discarded photographs and an extraordinary amount of stuff is the history of a sad and fractured family, haunted by dead children, divorce and alcohol.

The Life of Stuff is a deeply personal memoir about mourning and the shoring up of possessions against the losses and griefs of life, which also raises universal questions about what makes us the people we are. What do our possessions say about us? Why do we project such meaning onto them? And what painful circumstances turn someone who loves their home and the stuff it contains into an incurable hoarder who ends their days in squalor?

Mockingbird Songs

Wayne Flynt

An indelible portrait of one of the most famous and beloved authors in the canon of American literature – a collection of letters between Harper Lee and one of her closest friends that reveals the famously private writer as never before, in her own words.

The violent racism of the American South drove Wayne Flynt away from his home in Alabama, but the publication of To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee’s classic novel about courage, community and equality, inspired him to return in the early 1960s and craft a career documenting and teaching Alabama history. His writing resonated with many, in particular three sisters: Louise, Alice and Nelle Harper Lee. The two families first met in 1983, and a mutual respect and affection for the state’s history and literature matured into a deep friendship between them.

Wayne Flynt and Nelle Harper Lee began writing to one other while she was living in New York – heartfelt, insightful and humorous letters in which they swapped stories, information and opinions on topics including their families, books, social values, health concerns and even their fears and accomplishments. Though their earliest missives began formally – ‘Dear Dr Flynt’ – as the years passed, their exchanges became more intimate and emotional, opening with ‘Dear Friend’ and closing with ‘I love you, Nelle.’

This is a remarkable compendium of a correspondence that lasted for a quarter century – until Harper Lee’s death in February 2016 – and it offers an incisive and compelling look into the mind, heart and work of one of the most beloved authors in modern literary history.

A Journey Through the Cycling Year

The Cycling Podcast

Readers as well as listeners can now embark on a journey through the cycling year with The Cycling Podcast, which has been entertaining and informing fans since 2013.

Richard Moore, Lionel Birnie and Daniel Friebe share their diaries from three incident-filled Grand Tours, the Giro d’Italia, Tour de France and Vuelta a España. These take readers behind the scenes and explore the culture and landscape as well as the racing, while the ‘Lionel of Flanders’, complete with beer recommendations, does the same for the Classics in Belgium.

There are appearances, too, by leading journalists and podcast favourites François Thomazeau, who takes responsiblity for the French Tour de France jinx, Ciro Scognamiglio, with a heartfelt love letter to cult favourite Filippo Pozzato, Fran Reyes, who pens a farewell to El Pistolero, Alberto Contador, and Orla Chennaoui, who hits the road to cover La Course in a one-woman karaoke-booth-on-wheels.

Further contributions from professional riders Ashleigh Moolman Pasio and Joe Dombrowski and the voice of the Tour de France, Sebastien Piquet, as well as stunning galleries from the podcast world’s first and only dedicated photographer, Simon Gill, make this the perfect celebration of a year in cycling.

My Dear Bessie: A Love Story in Letters

Chris Barker (and others)

Benedict Cumberbatch and Louise Brealey read a love story in letters, played out against the backdrop of the Second World War.

‘Can you feel, as you read these words, that I am thinking of you now; aglow, alive, alert at the thought that you are in the same world, and by some strange chance loving me.’

A small blue box opened in 2008 revealed a wartime world of love, longing and frustration. Inside were bundles and bundles of letters written neatly in pen, in pencil, on thin blue airmail paper or headed army notepaper. Envelopes covered in postmarks, redirections, censor’s stamps. A love affair in letters, between two people who barely knew each other, thousands of miles apart, in the middle of a war, with no idea when or whether they will ever see each other again.

On September 5th 1943, Chris Barker, a signalman stationed near Tobruk in North Africa, decided to write to a former work colleague, Bessie Moore, a Morse code interpreter at the Foreign Office back in London. The unexpected warmth of Bessie's reply changed their lives forever.

Chris and Bessie's love letters first appeared in Simon Garfield's book To The Letter. They toured literary festivals as part of Letters Live before being published in a book, My Dear Bessie.

Duration: 45 mins

Make Someone Happy and Find Your Own Happiness Along the Way

Emily Coxhead

When we are kind we feel happy and this inspiring journal will help you to do just that: every page focuses on the bright spots we overlook every day and will encourage you to pass these simple joys on to others. With infectious charm and delightful illustrations, Make Someone Happy will help you to discover your true sense of happiness by brightening the world around you:

- Find a good news story from this week and share it
- Fill a box with treats and positive notes and send it to a good friend
- Leave an encouraging note for a stranger to find
- Think of the kindest thing someone has done for you – how can you return the favour?

Make Someone Happy is a reminder that together we can make the world a kinder, happier place, one good deed at a time.

Go Ask Alice

Have you ever kept a diary? This is the diary of a young girl growing up in sixties America – an honest account of teenage life. But as well as discovering new friends, dating and going to parties, the author of this diary discovers something else: drugs. It is the era of free love and experimentation with mind-bending substances. And one thing leads to another.

This book was first published several decades ago as the shocking real diary of a young woman. Whether it is fact or fiction is up to you to decide.

BACKSTORY: Read the fascinating story of this mysterious book’s first publication

In the Land of Pain

Alphonse Daudet

Alphonse Daudet was a highly popular nineteenth-century French novelist, whose work radiated humour and good cheer. Few knew that for his entire adult life he suffered from syphilis, a disease both unmentionable and incurable at the time. What even fewer realised was that he kept an intimate notebook in which he recorded the development and terrifying effects of the disease. Describing a life in pain, and the sometimes alarming treatments he underwent, Daudet's journal is unique for its comic zest, lucid self-examination and stoicism.

Translated by the Booker Prize-winning writer Julian Barnes.

Everything I Know About Love

Dolly Alderton

***THE SUNDAY TIMES TOP 5 BESTSELLER***

'A wonderful writer, who will surely inspire a generation the way that Caitlin Moran did before her' Julie Burchill

'I loved it so much, I wanted it to go on forever, Dolly Alderton is so gifted at making people care. A rare talent' Marian Keyes

'I can say with absolute certainty that you have to add it to your 2018 book list' The Pool

When it comes to the trials and triumphs of becoming a grown up, journalist and former Sunday Times dating columnist Dolly Alderton has seen and tried it all. In her memoir, she vividly recounts falling in love, wrestling with self-sabotage, finding a job, throwing a socially disastrous Rod-Stewart themed house party, getting drunk, getting dumped, realising that Ivan from the corner shop is the only man you've ever been able to rely on, and finding that that your mates are always there at the end of every messy night out. It's a book about bad dates, good friends and - above all else - about recognising that you and you alone are enough.

Glittering with wit and insight, heart and humour, Dolly Alderton's powerful début weaves together personal stories, satirical observations, a series of lists, recipes, and other vignettes that will strike a chord of recognition with women of every age - while making you laugh until you fall over. Everything I know About Love is about the struggles of early adulthood in all its grubby, hopeful uncertainty.

A spot-on, wildly funny and sometimes heart-breaking book about growing up, growing older and navigating all kinds of love along the way

Praise for Everything I Know About Love

'With courageous honesty, Alderton documents her life up to now, the highs and the lows - the sex, the drugs, the nightmare landlords, the heartaches and the humiliations. Deeply funny, sometimes shocking, and admirably open-hearted and optimistic. Only this writer, in this time, could have made such a mesmerising pattern from mess and colour. A brilliant debut.' Daily Telegraph

'It's so full of life and laughs - I gobbled up this book. Alderton has built something beautiful and true out of many fragments of daftness' Amy Liptrot

I loved its truth, its self awareness, humour and most of all, its heart-spilling generosity. Just when you think it's going one (wonderful) way, it takes you somewhere infinitely more rugged, complicated and all the more affectingly tender. A joy. In short, it's a stone cold classic' Sophie Dahl

Modern Nature

Derek Jarman

In 1986 Derek Jarman discovered he was HIV positive and decided to make a garden at his cottage on the bleak coast of Dungeness. Facing an uncertain future, he nevertheless found solace in nature, growing all manner of plants. While some perished beneath wind and sea-spray others flourished, creating brilliant, unexpected beauty in the wilderness.

Modern Nature is both a diary of the garden and a meditation by Jarman on his own life: his childhood, his time as a young gay man in the 1960s, his renowned career as an artist, writer and film-maker. It is at once a lament for a lost generation, an unabashed celebration of gay sexuality, and a devotion to all that is living.