New and forthcoming

Lucky Man

Matthew Etherington

You have money burning a hole in your pocket. You have more free time than you know what to do with. And your whole life is geared around winning. What do you do with your cash?
For former premier league footballer Matt Etherington, he, like many of his peers, gambled. But what started as harmless entertainment spiralled into a vortex of depression and debt, almost destroying his marriage, his career and himself.
Exposing the intense pressures of the premiership in a way that's never before been shared, Matt's story also shows how, in life, there's always a second half.

The Secret Doctor

The Secret Doctor

I have walked in and out of the lives of countless numbers of patients. I have stood in rooms, in corners; sat on beds, chairs, and knelt on floors. I have been the visitor who is there when you find yourself most vulnerable, when you lie on a hospital bed or on a trolley in the resus department of A&E. I have been the visitor that you may never even know was there at all.

How much do you know about the doctor who walked in and out of your life? Who diagnosed your mum, nursed your granddad in his last few days, or who saved your sister’s life? And have you ever wondered what they felt? If they cried later with joy, or with grief?

Told through the lens of six emotions that all of us can empathise with, this book from the British Medical Association’s own Secret Doctor gives us a unique window onto the other side of a hospital experience. Through the Secret Doctor’s eyes we see how grief can be found in many forms, and what happens when you see fear in a patient’s eyes. We find out how to cope when you’ve made a life-threatening mistake; or what joy looks like when you feel it, and how long it lasts.

These real stories from an anonymous doctor blur the lines between patient and doctor, showing us what a doctor sees of humanity as it comes through the revolving door of the hospital, what we have in common and what makes us human.

No Way Out

Lauren Elysia

“They’d degraded me to the point where I’d become this sex thing – this thing that wasn’t human, but just an object. To the point where I believed that’s what I was.”

Lauren’s ordeal began when she was living in the YMCA, and she was violently introduced to an Asian sex ring. Traumatised and alone, she was too weak to try to escape or even tell anyone. Four years later, she had been passed between over 70 men in Telford and Birmingham, was on drugs,and suffered with PTSD so severe she was on the edge of suicide. So when Operation Chalice came to recruit her, would she be strong enough to turn the tables and bring her abusers down?

Unseen

Reggie Yates

From Grange Hill to Top of the Pops, Reggie Yates has been on camera nearly all of his life, but it’s as a documentary filmmaker – and a pretty fearless one at that – where he has truly been making his mark, investigating everything from gun crime in Chicago, to life as a refugee in Iraq.

In his first book, Unseen, Reggie takes us behind the scenes on his journey from TV host to documentary storyteller. Using some of the key moments and extreme circumstances he has found himself in, Reggie examines what he has learned about the world, and himself as a person.

Beginning as a brief exploration of Reggie’s relationship with the camera and life growing up on screen, Unseen explores the journey Reggie has taken in the documentary world. Initially resistant to documentary making, Reggie was convinced his point of view as a young black working class man with a history in music, children’s TV and entertainment would not make his films remotely credible. Through conflict and challenges on screen, the understanding gained from the very thing once seen as a weakness would become his strength on camera, as the eye of the everyman and voice of the audience. Unseen unpicks the stories behind the fascinating characters and situations Reggie encounters across a series of films, as well as chronicling the personal growth through each testing shoot for Yates himself.

Confessions of a Menopausal Woman

Andrea McLean

The menopause. There - we've said it. It's a huge part of every woman's life and yet it remains one of society's last taboos. An emotionally complex issue that can trigger a whole host of physical and mental side effects, it's a big deal. So why aren't we talking about it?

Talking about stuff is what women do best; we share and offload, we laugh and we bond over the ridiculous and incredible things our bodies go through. Hearing other people's experiences is what makes our own so much more bearable - because we know that we aren't alone. This is the book that Andrea McLean wished for as she found herself in uncharted territory, grappling with the physical aftershock of a hysterectomy and the psychological fallout of a difficult menopause.

After announcing live on Loose Women that she would be absent from the screen as she recovered from surgery, Andrea was inundated with letters from other women struggling with the realities of the menopause, who were delighted that someone was finally talking openly and frankly about it. Typically candid, and including tips and tricks on diet, exercise and even your sex life, in Confessions of a Menopausal Woman Andrea brings her trademark humour and honesty to a very hot topic.

Realtime

Kevin Fong

Within minutes of the crash, you land at the scene. But nothing can prepare you for what you now find. So what do you do?

Professor Kevin Fong flies with the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service, making split-second, life-or-death decisions in the most extreme circumstances. In this gripping blend of memoir and reportage, he confronts a disturbing truth: sometimes even the best trained expert cannot know the right thing to do.

Telling stories of astonishing skill and catastrophic error, he shows that our ability to move at ever greater speeds in ever greater safety comes with a bitter irony: when something goes wrong – as it must – reacting quickly and effectively enough is now beyond human capability. Reflecting on his own dramatic experiences and those of war medics, pilots and surgeons, Fong considers how we might come to terms with the mess and blur of real decisions made in realtime.

This Is Just My Face

Gabourey Sidibe

This Is Just My Face is the whirlwind tour of Gabourey Sidibe’s life so far. In it, she shows us around the Harlem studio apartment where she grew up, and we meet the psychic who told her she’d one day be ‘famous like Oprah’; she relives the debilitating depression that hit her at college, and her first ever job as a phone sex ‘talker’ (less creepy than you’d think); she ushers us down the red carpet dressed in an outfit that cost $120, and describes what it feels like to be told by the President of the United States: ‘You’re the bomb, girl!’ Told with full-throttle honesty, irreverence and humour, this is a book for anyone who has ever felt like they’re in the wrong place at the wrong time, who has dreamed of a brighter future or wondered what Obama is really like.

In Your Defence

Sarah Langford

Sarah Langford is a barrister. Her job is to stand in court representing the mad and the bad, the vulnerable, the heartbroken and the hopeful. She must become their voice: weave their story around the black and white of the law and tell it to the courtroom. These stories may not make headlines but they will change the lives of ordinary people in extraordinary ways. They are stories which, but for a twist of luck, might have been yours.

To work at the Bar is to enter a world shrouded by strange clothing, archaic rituals and inaccessible language. So how does it feel to be an instrument of such an unknowable system? And what does it mean to be at its mercy? Our legal system promises us justice, impartiality and fair judgement. Does it, or can it, deliver this?

With remarkable candour, Sarah describes eleven cases which reveal what goes on in our criminal and family courts. She examines how she feels as she defends the person standing in the dock. She tells compelling stories - of domestic fall out, everyday burglary, sexual indiscretion, and children caught up in the law – that are sometimes shocking and often heart-stopping. She shows us how our attitudes and actions can shape not only the outcome of a case, but the legal system itself

A Moment of Grace

Patrick Dillon

How do you learn to live in the wake of death?

Patrick Dillon and Nicola Thorold were together for twenty-eight years. Patrick was an award-winning architect and writer and Nicola a leading figure in theatre, awarded an OBE for her contribution to the arts at London’s Roundhouse. Their two children were almost grown-up. Life was good.

And then, in May 2015, Nicola was diagnosed with leukaemia. After several rounds of treatment, a bone marrow transplant and many waves of recovery and decline, she died thirteen months after her diagnosis. Six months later, at Christmas, Patrick started to write.

A Moment of Grace is the searing, tender account of Patrick’s life with Nicola and her illness, and his life after her loss. But it is more than a story of illness and unbearable grief: it is a book of memory, of home, of family. It is a tale of the transfiguring power of love. Heartbreaking, life-affirming and truly unforgettable, A Moment of Grace is one man’s journey to find life after his wife’s death.

The Life of Stuff

Susannah Walker

Until her mother died, Susannah Walker had no idea how much of a hoarder she had become. In the months following the death, Susannah had to sort through a dilapidated house filled to the brim with rubbish and treasures, in search of a woman she'd never really known. Her hope was to piece together her mother's life and discover her reasons for hoarding, in her last chance to understand their troubled relationship. What emerged from the mess of scattered papers, discarded photographs and an extraordinary amount of stuff was the history of a sad and fractured family, haunted by dead children, divorces and alcohol.

The Life of Stuff is a moving memoir about mourning and the shoring up of possessions against the losses and griefs of life, a deeply personal story that raises universal questions about what makes us who we are. What do our possessions say about us? Why do we project such meaning on to them? And what cruel twist turns someone who simply enjoys having objects around them into the kind of person who hoards compulsively, ending their days in abject squalor?

Our Story

Rao Pingru (and others)

Rao Pingru was a twenty-six-year-old soldier when he saw Mao Meitang, a girl he’d known from childhood who had grown up to be a beautiful woman – the woman his father had arranged for him to marry. One glimpse of her through a window as she put on lipstick was enough to capture Rao’s heart, the moment that sparked a union that would last almost sixty years.

Our Story is that epic romance told through his paintings and accompanying text. We see Pingru and Meitang through the decades, through both poverty and good fortune – looking for work, opening a restaurant, moving cities, mending shoes, raising their children, and being separated for seventeen years by the government when Pingru is sent to a labour camp. As they age, China undergoes extraordinary growth, political turmoil and cultural change. When Meitang passes away in 2008, Pingru memorialises his wife and their relationship the only way he knows how: painting. In an outpouring of love and grief, he puts it all on paper. It’s a tale at once tragic and inspiring, of enduring love and simple values, an old-fashioned story that unfolds in a nation rapidly becoming modern. Spanning from 1923 to 2008, Our Story is a truly singular graphic memoir.

The Language of Kindness

Christie Watson

Christie Watson was a nurse for twenty years. Taking us from birth to death and from A and E to the mortuary, The Language of Kindness is an astonishing account of a profession defined by acts of care, compassion and kindness.

We watch Christie with a new mother holding her premature son who has miraculously made it through the night, we stand by her side as she spends many hours watching agonising heart and lung surgery, and we hold our breath as she washes the hair of a child fatally injured in a fire, attempting to remove the toxic smell of smoke before the grieving family arrive.

In our most extreme moments, when life is lived most intensely, Christie is there by your side. She is a guide, mentor and friend. And in these dark days of division and isolationism, she encourages you to stretch out your hand.

First, We Make the Beast Beautiful

Sarah Wilson

'Probably the best book on living with anxiety that I've ever read' Mark Manson, bestselling author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

Sarah Wilson gravitates to life’s problems, passing on her hard-earned wisdoms to all who want to make life better. Having helped over 1.5m people across the world to quit sugar, in First, we make the beast beautiful she now turns her intense focus and fierce investigatory skills onto the lifetime companion that’s brought her the most pain and become her finest teacher. Anxiety.

Looking at the triggers and treatments, fashions and fads, she reads widely, interviewing fellow sufferers, mental health patients, philosophers, and even the Dalai Lama, processing all she learns through the prism of her own experience. She pulls at the thread of accepted definitions of anxiety, unravelling the notion that it is a disease that must be medicated into submission. Could anxiety be re-sewn, she asks, into a thing of beauty?

There are many books about coping with anxiety. This one encourages the myriad sufferers of the world's most common mental illness to thrive with anxiety, and even to delight in the possibilities it offers for a richer, fuller life.

Practical, poetic, wise and funny, this is a small book with a big heart.

All That Remains

Sue Black

Sue Black confronts death every day. As Professor of Anatomy and Forensic Anthropology, she focuses on mortal remains in her lab, at burial sites, at scenes of violence, murder and criminal dismemberment, and when investigating mass fatalities due to war, accident or natural disaster. In All that Remains she reveals the many faces of death she has come to know, using key cases to explore how forensic science has developed, and what her work has taught her.

Do we expect a book about death to be sad? Macabre? Sue’s book is neither. There is tragedy, but there is also humour in stories as gripping as the best crime novel. Our own death will remain a great unknown. But as an expert witness from the final frontier, Sue Black is the wisest, most reassuring, most compelling of guides.

Rosie

Rose Tremain

Readers very often ask writers, ‘how did your writing life begin?’ In this short memoir, Rose tries to answer that question, buried somewhere in a complex childhood, which was both materially privileged and emotionally impoverished.

Growing up in post-war London, a city still partly in ruins, with a society constrained to fierce austerity because of rationing, the girl known then as ‘Rosie’ and her sister Jo long perpetually for the refuge of their grandparents Hampshire farm, where the food is plentiful and the landscape serene. They believe that this place will be ‘theirs’ forever, and that their lives will go on in an untroubled way.

But when Rosie is ten years old, everything changes. She and Jo lose their father, their London house, their school, their friends, and most agonisingly of all, their beloved Nanny, Vera, the only adult to have shown them real love and affection. At a cold boarding-school in Hertfordshire, they feel like castaways.

Rose Tremain casts a revealing light on the ‘vanished’ world of the 1940s and 1950s in England and describes the slow journey from being Rosie, the outcast girl, to becoming Rose, the writer of powerful fictions that have won worldwide acclaim.

The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her Mind

Barbara K.Lipska

All we think, feel and dream, how we move, if we move, everything that makes us who we are, comes from the brain. We are the brain. So what happens when the brain fails? What happens when we lose our mind?

In January 2015 renowned neuroscientist Barbara Lipska's melanoma spread to her brain. It was, in effect, a death sentence. She had surgery, radiation treatments and entered an immunotherapy clinical trial. And then her brain started to play tricks on her. The expert on mental illness - who had spent a career trying to work out how the brain operates and what happens when it fails - experienced what it is like to go mad.

She began to exhibit paranoia and schizophrenia-like symptoms. She became disinhibited, completely unaware of her inappropriate behaviour. She got lost driving home from work, a journey she did every day. She couldn't remember things that had just happened to her. Small details like what she was having for breakfast became an obsession, but she ignored the fact that she was about to die. And she remembers every moment with absolute clarity.

Weaving the science of the mind and the biology of the brain into her deeply personal story, this is the dramatic account of Dr Lipska's own brilliant brain gone awry.

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