New and forthcoming

Lucky Man

Matthew Etherington

You have money burning a hole in your pocket. You have more free time than you know what to do with. And your whole life is geared around winning. What do you do with your cash?
For former premier league footballer Matt Etherington, he, like many of his peers, gambled. But what started as harmless entertainment spiralled into a vortex of depression and debt, almost destroying his marriage, his career and himself.
Exposing the intense pressures of the premiership in a way that's never before been shared, Matt's story also shows how, in life, there's always a second half.

Realtime

Kevin Fong

Within minutes of the crash, you land at the scene. But nothing can prepare you for what you now find. So what do you do?

Professor Kevin Fong flies with the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service, making split-second, life-or-death decisions in the most extreme circumstances. In this gripping blend of memoir and reportage, he confronts a disturbing truth: sometimes even the best trained expert cannot know the right thing to do.

Telling stories of astonishing skill and catastrophic error, he shows that our ability to move at ever greater speeds in ever greater safety comes with a bitter irony: when something goes wrong – as it must – reacting quickly and effectively enough is now beyond human capability. Reflecting on his own dramatic experiences and those of war medics, pilots and surgeons, Fong considers how we might come to terms with the mess and blur of real decisions made in realtime.

She Wants It

Jill Soloway

A new title from Jill Soloway

At Home with Muhammad Ali

Hana Yasmeen Ali

It has been said that more books have been written about Muhammad Ali than anyone in the world. However, not one has ever had the emotional impact and historical bearing that this new book has to offer. At Home With Muhammad Ali is a unique mixture of narrative stories and transcriptions of Muhammad Ali’s personal home recordings. Through audio journals, love letters and cherished memories, Hana tells the story of a very typical and yet fully-unique family – the rise and fall of her parent’s marriage and the struggles they faced as a family surrounding Ali’s loss to Larry Holmes in 1980.

At Home With Muhammad Ali offers a candid look at a man who was trying to find his purpose in the world as he realized he was coming to the end of his lucrative boxing career, all the while trying to balance fatherhood and his worldly and political obligations.

In At Home With Muhammad Ali Hana will share the everyday adventures that the family experienced around the house (so ‘normal’ and yet not, with visitors like Michael Jackson and Clint Eastwood dropping by). And for the first time, Hana’s mother Veronica will share her memories of the 12-year relationship with Muhammad.

Candid and revealing, At Home With Muhammad Ali is more than a family memoir, it’s an intimate portrait of a legend, and a final love letter from a daughter to her father which is certain to become an essential contribution to Ali’s legacy.

A Very Human Ending

Jesse Bering

We are the only species on the face of the planet that deliberately ends its own life. More often than not, it is negative social evaluations - real or imagined - that drive us to such an extreme course of action. So what is it about the human brain that means that we may not only entertain suicidal thoughts but, in some cases, actually act upon them?

Combining cutting-edge scientific research with investigative journalism, psychologist Jesse Bering takes a long hard look at the human fascination with self-slaughter. From the sprawling woods of Aokigahara, better known as the Japanese 'suicide forest' that lies in the shadow of Mount Fuji, to a parasitology lab in New Zealand where researchers are studying how invisible organisms hijack the brains of their rodent hosts and steer them in the path of hungry cats, we go on a sobering search for the scientific bases of suicide.

In dealing with a volatile subject that simultaneously attracts and repulses, A Very Human Ending is guaranteed to jump-start a new conversation about a perennial problem that knows no cultural or demographic boundaries.

The Secret Doctor

The Secret Doctor

Grief. Anger. Joy. Fear. Distraction. Disgust. Hope.

All emotions we expect to encounter over our lifetime.
But what if this was every day?
And what if your ability to manage them was the difference between life and death?

For a doctor in Intensive Care this is part of the job. Fear in the eyes of a terminally ill patient who pleads with you to not let them die. Grief when an elderly person dies alone. Disgust at having to care for a convicted rapist. But there’s also the hope found in the resilience of a family and the joy that comes with a meaningful connection with a patient, however fleeting it may be.

These real stories reveal what a doctor sees of humanity as it comes through the revolving door of the hospital. Told through seven emotions that we can all empathise with, this book from the British Medical Association’s own Secret Doctor gives us a unique window onto the other side of a hospital experience, showing us how it feels to care for a living.

One Step Ahead

Stevyn Colgan

Can lollipops reduce anti-social behaviour? Or wizards halt street gambling? Do fake bus stops protect pensioners? Will organising a dog show stop young people killing each other? Stevyn Colgan believes that the answer to all of those questions is 'Yes'. Packed with fascinating anecdotes and important questions, this astonishing book reveals the innovative and imaginative ways Colgan tried to prevent crime during his thirty years on the police force.

Colgan worked for twelve of those years as part of a unique team called The Problem Solving Unit. With no budget and laughable resources, they were given an extraordinary brief – to solve problems of crime and disorder that wouldn't respond to traditional policing. They were told they could try anything as long as it wasn't illegal, wasn't immoral, wouldn't bring the police into disrepute, and didn't cost very much.

With amusing, insightful and sometimes controversial approaches to problem solving, Colgan mixes personal anecdotes from his time on the force with real-world examples of how The Problem Solving Unit helped build communities and prevent recurring crime.

At its core, this book's message is simple: police should direct far more effort towards preventing crime before it happens rather than solving crime after it has happened.

The Last Landlady

Laura Thompson

Laura Thompson’s grandmother Violet was one of the great landladies. Born in a London pub, she became the first woman to be given a publican’s license in her own name and, just as pubs defined her life, she seemed to embody their essence.

Laura spent part of her childhood in her grandmother's Home Counties establishment, mesmerised by the landlady's gift for creating the mix of the everyday and the theatrical that defined the pub’s atmosphere, making it a unique reflection of the national character. Her memories of this time are just as intoxicating: beer and ash on the carpets in the morning, the deepening rhythms of mirth at night, the magical brightness of glass behind the bar…

Through them she traces the story of the English pub, asking why it has occupied such a treasured position in our culture. But even Violet, as she grew older, recognised that places like hers were a dying breed, and Laura also considers the precarious future they face. Part memoir, part social history, part elegy, this book pays tribute to an extraordinary woman and the world she epitomized.

No Way Out

Kate Elysia

“They’d degraded me to the point where I’d become this sex thing – this thing that wasn’t human, but just an object. To the point where I believed that’s what I was.”

Kate’s ordeal began when she was living in sheltered accommodation, and she was violently introduced to an Asian sex ring. Traumatised and alone, she was too weak to try to escape or even tell anyone. Four years later, she had been passed between over 70 men in the West Midlands, was on drugs, and suffered with PTSD so severe she was on the edge of suicide. So when Operation Chalice came to recruit her, would she be strong enough to turn the tables and bring her abusers down?

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Maya Angelou (and others)

Maya Angelou’s debut memoir is a modern American classic, beloved worldwide. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings recounts a youth filled with curiosity, wonder, disappointment, frustration, tragedy, and hard-won independence.

Abandoned by their parents, Maya and her older brother Bailey are sent to live with their grandmother and uncle in a small Southern town in Arkansas, where they must endure the prejudice of their white neighbours. When their father unexpectedly returns to take them away, the children are then left with their mother in St Louis, Missouri. At eight years old, Maya is abused by her mother's boyfriend, an experience that haunts her for a lifetime. She remains reclusive until she meets Mrs Bertha Flowers, who encourages her love of books and helps her to regain her own strong spirit.

This brand new BBC Radio 4 dramatisation of Maya Angelou's American classic will play out her extraordinary story with dramatic verve and poetic brilliance.

Confessions of a Menopausal Woman

Andrea McLean

The menopause. There - we've said it. It's a huge part of every woman's life and yet it remains one of society's last taboos. An emotionally complex issue that can trigger a whole host of physical and mental side effects, it's a big deal. So why aren't we talking about it?

Talking about stuff is what women do best; we share and offload, we laugh and we bond over the ridiculous and incredible things our bodies go through. Hearing other people's experiences is what makes our own so much more bearable - because we know that we aren't alone. This is the book that Andrea McLean wished for as she found herself in uncharted territory, grappling with the physical aftershock of a hysterectomy and the psychological fallout of a difficult menopause.

After announcing live on Loose Women that she would be absent from the screen as she recovered from surgery, Andrea was inundated with letters from other women struggling with the realities of the menopause, who were delighted that someone was finally talking openly and frankly about it. Typically candid, and including tips and tricks on diet, exercise and even your sex life, in Confessions of a Menopausal Woman Andrea brings her trademark humour and honesty to a very hot topic.

In Your Defence

Sarah Langford

Sarah Langford is a barrister. Her job is to stand in court representing the mad and the bad, the vulnerable, the heartbroken and the hopeful. She must become their voice: weave their story around the black and white of the law and tell it to the courtroom. These stories may not make headlines but they will change the lives of ordinary people in extraordinary ways. They are stories which, but for a twist of luck, might have been yours.

To work at the Bar is to enter a world shrouded by strange clothing, archaic rituals and inaccessible language. So how does it feel to be an instrument of such an unknowable system? And what does it mean to be at its mercy? Our legal system promises us justice, impartiality and fair judgement. Does it, or can it, deliver this?

With remarkable candour, Sarah describes eleven cases which reveal what goes on in our criminal and family courts. She examines how she feels as she defends the person standing in the dock. She tells compelling stories - of domestic fall out, everyday burglary, sexual indiscretion, and children caught up in the law – that are sometimes shocking and often heart-stopping. She shows us how our attitudes and actions can shape not only the outcome of a case, but the legal system itself

This Is Just My Face

Gabourey Sidibe

This Is Just My Face is the whirlwind tour of Gabourey Sidibe’s life so far. In it, we meet her polygamous father, her gifted mother who fed the family by busking on the subway, and the psychic who told her she’d one day be ‘famous like Oprah’.

Gabby shows us round the Harlem studio apartment where she grew up, relives the debilitating depression that hit her at college, and reminisces about her first ever job as a phone sex ‘talker’ (less creepy than you’d think).

With exhilaratingly honest (and often hilarious) dispatches on friendship, depression, celebrity, haters, fashion, race, and weight, This Is Just My Face will resonate with anyone who has ever felt different - and with anyone who has ever felt inspired to make a dream come true.

Women are the Future of Islam

Sherin Khankan

A remarkable woman challenges the idea that Islam can be defined by masculinity, conservatism and apparent bigoted aggression.

Named one of the BBC's 100 Women of 2016, and the subject of a Guardian interview, Sherin Khankan is one of the very few female imams in the Western World. In addition she has founded the first mosque for women in Europe.

In her revelatory book, she addresses such issues as the place for modern women in Islam, fundamentalism, the wearing of burkhas, Islamic divorce, Sufism...and she also describes her own personal journey as a female Muslim activist.

Women Are The Future of Islam shines a feminist light on a gentler, more inclusive, more liberal - but also fully engaged - side of Islam that we rarely see in the West. It's an eye-opening, highly topical read.

Returning to Reims

Didier Eribon

"There was a question that had come to trouble me a bit earlier, once I had taken the first steps on this return journey to Reims...

Why, when I have had such an intense experience of forms of shame related to class, shame in relation to the milieu in which I grew up, why, when once I had arrived in Paris and started meeting people from such different class backgrounds, I would often find myself lying about my class origins... why had it never occurred to me to take up this problem in a book?"

Returning to Reims is a breath-taking memoir of return, a family story of class, sexuality, gender and of the shifting political allegiances of the French working classes. A phenomenon in France and a huge bestseller in Germany, Didier Eribon has written the defining memoir of our times.

The Terrible

Yrsa Daley-Ward

'You may not run away from the thing that you are
because it comes and comes and comes as sure as you breathe.'

This is the story of Yrsa Daley-Ward, and all the things that happened - 'even the Terrible Things (and God, there were Terrible Things)'. It's about her childhood in the north-west of England with her beautiful, careworn mother Marcia, Linford (the man formerly known as Dad, 'half-fun, half-frightening') and her little brother Roo, who sees things written in the stars. It's about growing up and discovering the power and fear of her own sexuality, of pitch grey days of pills and powder and encounters. It's about damage and pain, but also joy. Told with raw intensity, shocking honesty and the poetry of the darkest of fairy tales, The Terrible is a memoir of going under, losing yourself, and finding your voice.

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