New and forthcoming

Money In The Bank

P.G. Wodehouse

When George, Viscount Uffenham turns the entire family fortune into diamonds and squirrels them away, naturally he forgets where he has hidden the loot and finds himself compelled to let the family seat to stay afloat. So it is that Mrs Cork’s health colony comes into being, providing the perfect setting for crime and young love to flower.

Churchill's Wit

Richard M. Langworth

Charismatic, erudite and often controversial Winton Churchill was one of the most inspiring leaders of the 20th century, and one of its greatest wits. His much-celebrated sense of fun and mischief has led to many of his jokes and ripostes becoming almost as well known as his famous wartime speeches. Gloriously definitive, Richard Langworth includes all Churchill's most famous quips and witticisms, as well as little known asides and observations. The only book of its kind to be sanctioned by the Churchill estate, it captures the great statesman at his most eloquent, witty, and engaging, Churchill's Wit celebrates the humour and humanity of this most imposing man.

'My dear young man, thought is the most dangerous process known to man.'

'I believe I am the only man in the world to have received the head of a nation naked.'

'[A politician] is asked to stand, he wants to sit and he is expected to lie.'

'-Winston, you are drunk, and what's more you are disgustingly drunk.
-Bessie, my dear, you are ugly, and what's more, you are disgustingly ugly. But tomorrow I shall be sober and you will still be disgustingly ugly.'

Ed Reardon's Week: Series 7 (Episodes 1-4)

Andrew Nickolds (and others)

Radio 4’s most curmudgeonly author is back for a new series, complete with his trusty companion Elgar, his pipe and his never ending capacity for scrimping and scraping at whatever scraps his agent, Ping, can offer him to keep body, mind and cat together. In these four episodes, austerity has hit Ed hard. But things may be looking up as he starts working with the most disturbingly fresh and mesmerizingly compelling voice of his generation, Ben Herbert, and finds himself employed on a corporate video along with director and old sparring partner Jaz Milvane. He also enrols on a writing course and learns a thing or two about setting up his very own ‘Script Doctor’ service. Plus, Ed finds himself in the middle of some sibling rivalry when Ping’s sister, Py, undertakes some work experience at the agency. Written by Christopher Douglas and Andrew Nickolds, and guest starring Stephanie Cole as Olive, John Fortune as Felix and Barunka O’Shaughnessy as Ping.

You're a Lovely Mum Because. . .

Ged Backland

Aiming to make life a little bit sweeter, this irresistible title forms part of the Suga-Lumps gift book series, celebrating people we love, by the creator of the successful greetings card range. Written in an off-beat, conversational style, the book blends cute artwork with wit and wisdom and gentle humour. The cards have proved very popular on the high street and this adorable series will take them to a new fan base.

Kama Sutra Dot-to-Dot

For consenting adults only, this wickedly witty book only exposes its 30 exotic positions to the most persistent hands.

Put a little lead in your pencil and get stuck in. It's almost definitely the most fun you can have with your clothes on!

(Partner not included. Do try this at home.)

Company For Henry

P.G. Wodehouse

Everyone in Company for Henry wants to escape from something. Hard-up Henry Paradene would like to unload his hideous country house on his millionaire American cousin, J. Wendell Stickney. Wendell wishes he could be rid of his embarrassing aunt Kelly, while Kelly wants to escape her financial dependence on Wendell. Henry's niece, Jane, needs to part from her glamorous but ghastly fiancé, Lionel, while Bill Hardy, who falls for Jane, needs no convincing to abandon the bachelor state. Jane's brother Algey, meanwhile, spends his time thinking up dodgy schemes to lift himself out of poverty. Everything ends happily ever after for most of them, but only when they have been put through the hoops of a classic Wodehouse plot.

150 Things Every Man Should Know

Gareth May

Do you know how to change a tyre? Give a speech? Or shave without leaving a nasty rash? How about ironing a shirt? Urinal etiquette? Or how to know if you are falling in love?

Neither did 24-year-old author Gareth May until he started to gather centuries-old male wisdom for the 'metrosexual' generation. Stuck on the verge of a major motorway with a punctured tyre after swerving to avoid a low-flying pigeon, Gareth was confronted with the fact that he had no idea how to mend his puncture and get back on the road.

Later, after the excoriating diatribe and accusations of uselessness from his father, he reflected that it wasn't just practical, manly skills - tying a tie properly, wielding a power drill, changing a leaky faucet - that had passed him by. Gareth was clueless about just pretty much every skill perceived as the key to coming of age as a modern man. Sophisticated stuff, like how to hold a baby or how to end a relationship without being a complete git...

While girls share magazines with dog-eared problem pages, the modern boy has no such manual, no instruction leaflet to ease their transition into manhood. Until now.

Gareth May has written the essential manual for young men across the world. From stubborn spots to slow dancing dos and don'ts, the perfect fry-up to putting on a condom in less than ten seconds, witty, brilliantly honest and down-to-earth, 150 THINGS EVERY MAN SHOULD KNOW tells you all those things your best friend can't.

From Here To Maternity

Mel Giedroyc

'I'm 35 years old. A low-ranking TV personality. Rather immature and carefree, my only responsibility to date has been a guinea pig. All that's about to change. I'm pregnant, and now I've become a cheddar cheese junkie, inseparable from my dungarees. Help!'

Who can Mel turn to?

Pen, her best friend, who is still annoyingly carefree and single, and whose effect on Mel is like an injection of pure caffeine to the system?

Jools, the hippy who recommends basil nosegay for labour pains and placenta pate canapes when entertaining?

Amanda, the well-heeled, pregnant-friend-from-Hell who, only weeks after her textbook delivery, is planning to have her firstborn taught to ski?

Kate, Mel's sister and mother of two, whose offspring are inclined towards dangerous Captain Hook impersonations and sudden mood swings?

Mel's mother, who got Mel through babyhood by way of regular coffee mornings and who impresses on her the importance of portable 1950s baby gear that looks about as foldable as a Transit van?

Dan, the dad-to-be, who suddenly stops going to the pub to concentrate on Mel's dietary requirements and has adopted the sinister habit of always keeping a tape measure attached to his belt?

The Seven Words You Can't Say on Television

Steven Pinker

Why do so many swear words involve sex, bodily functions and religion? Why are some words rude and others aren't? Why can launching into expletives be so shocking - and sometimes so amusing?

Steven Pinker takes us on a fascinating and funny journey through the world of profanities, taken from his bestselling The Stuff of Thought, to show us why we swear (whatever our language or culture), how taboos change and how we use obscenities in different ways. You'll discover that in Québecois French the expression 'Tabernacle' is outrageous, that the Middle Ages were littered with four-letter words, that 'scumbag' has a very unsavoury origin and that in a certain Aboriginal language every word is filthy when spoken in front of your mother-in-law.

Covering everything from free speech to Tourette's, from pottymouthed celebrities to poetry, this book reveals what swearing tells us about how our minds work. (It's also a bloody good read).

The Hapless Teacher's Handbook

Phil Ball

When Phil Ball left university with a workmanlike English degree to his name and no discernible ambitions, he wasn't entirely sure what to do next. So like many before him he thought he'd giving teaching a go. Why not?

This is the comic story of one man's painfully slow metamorphosis into a teacher at an everyday comprehensive and his encounters with other remarkable teachers and pupils along the way. The good, the bad, the violent, the victimised and the clinically insane: from his first teaching practice nemesis, Alan Plant, who knows his dark secret, to the pupil who believes he is a reincarnation of the poet Andrew Marvell. It is a tale of the highs and lows of attempting to teach: from the joy of really making a difference to young minds to being physically set upon by a teenage horde.

And that's just what happens in the classroom. Beyond it is the real world of teachers behind staff-room doors: desperate lives, unseemly professional competition, a diet of cigarettes, alcohol and cold coffee, casual sex and general social dysfunction. Not a great example, but the truth...

Fur Shui

Paula Brown

In Fur Shui Paula takes readers on a light-hearted romp through the application of the ancient and venerable universal laws of energy drawn from The Black Hat School of Feng Shui and how they relate to the furry folk world of pets and animals. This primer introduces a new branch of animal Feng Shui that she calls 'fur shui' and offers insight into how Black Hat Feng Shui translates into Black Cat Fur Shui.

A delightfully illustrated guide to animal energies, Fur Shui features helpful charts as well as information on fur elementals and cycles, fur chi dos and don'ts and do-it-yourself tips on moving back into positive fur chi flow and balance. It's a charming look at the flow of energy in animals and how we can apply this knowledge in fun yet practical ways.

Colouring for Grown-ups

Ryan Hunter (and others)

A caustically funny book of games with a decidedly adult twist.
Hungover? Want to look busy while you wait for your Guardian soulmate? Or maybe you just need distraction to while away your pitifully short lunchbreak? Whatever the pathetic occasion, this is the book for you. Offering an ironic look at the stereotypes, habits and challenges of modern adulthood Colouring for Grown-ups includes:
- 6 Steps for Compromising your Integrity and Goals
- The truly intense "Dodge the Debt Collectors" activity maze
- Life Partner Laboratory – where your perfect soul mate is more than just a laughable fantasy!Materials required: colouring utensils
Optional requirements: emotional maturity; financial independence; personal boundaries.

A Mess of Iguanas, A Whoop of Gorillas ...

Alon Shulman

There are many wonderful creatures on earth - and even more incredible ways to describe them.

With more collective nouns for animal groups than anyone else in the world, from a Business of Ferrets to a Wobble of Ostriches (not forgetting, of course, an Implausibility of Gnus) Alon Shulman's A Mess of Iguanas, A Whoop of Gorillas will tell you what to call a group of zebras, chickens, parrots, spiders, tigers or penguins the next time you encounter one - and will even let you know the difference between a school and a shoal of fish. Not to mention why groups of swans are known as a lamentation, a bank and a wedge.

It will also tell you the most outlandish, strange yet completely accurate animal facts you can imagine. For example, did you know that polar bears are invisible to infra-red because they have transparent fur? Or that hippopotamus can't swim? Or that ostriches do not bury their heads in the sand?

Filled with everything you could ever want to know about the creatures that inhabit our world, this brilliant compendium of animal curiosities is perfect for pub quizzers, language buffs, wannabe know-it-alls and any readers aged, well ... 8 to 80.

Lisa Simpson's Guide to Geek Chic

Matt Groening

In Lisa Simpson’s Guide to Geek Chic, Springfield’s most sensitive student reveals the secrets of being a misunderstood geek goddess.

Geeks are no longer just those sideshow freaks biting the heads off chickens. Geeks are now freaks about all kinds of other things and are proud to let it show. Geek is now chic, nerdy is now noble, and dorky is now desirable, as they always should have been. The readers, the writers, the scientists, and the creators are now at the top of the heap, and it’s time to show the rest of the world what they are made of . . . beside mostly oxygen, carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, calcium, and phosphorus, of course.

Let your geek flag fly!

My Man Jeeves

P.G. Wodehouse

Containing drafts of stories later rewritten for other collections (including Carry On, Jeeves), My Man Jeeves offers a fascinating insight into the genesis of comic literature's most celebrated double-act. All the stories are set in New York, four of them featuring Jeeves and Wooster themselves; the rest concerning Reggie Pepper, an earlier version of Bertie. Plots involve the usual cast of amiable young clots, choleric millionaires, chorus-girls and vulpine aunts, but towering over them all is the inscrutable figure of Jeeves, manipulating the action from behind the scenes.
Early or not, these stories are masterly examples of Wodehouse's art,turning the most ordinary incidents into golden farce.

A Gentleman Of Leisure

P.G. Wodehouse

In this comic novel - dedicated to Douglas Fairbanks, who starred in the stage version - Jimmy Pitt, man-about-town and former newspaper hound, takes a bet that he cannot commit burglary. He finds breaking and entering easy enough, but then discovers that he has forced his way into the home of a tough New York policeman. Naturally, Captain McEachern has a beautiful daughter and problems of his own. The complications which ensue from their meeting, involving a rich cast of Wodehousean characters from both sides of the Atlantic, create one of his most amusing and light-hearted early novels.

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