New and forthcoming

Rebel Rebel

Chris Sullivan

Escape the everyday humdrum with this exploration of iconic rebels from the past who became the biggest influencers of fashion, music and society by doing things their own way.

From the internationally bestselling author of Punk and founder of the legendary Wag Club in Soho, Rebel Rebel presents 60 pieces on outsiders. Like a really good party, it’s got musicians (Charlie Mingus, Fela Kuti, Joe Strummer), actors (Louise Brooks, Robert Mitchum, Daniel Day Lewis), artists (Egon Schiele, Man Ray, Jackson Pollock), directors (Fritz Lang, Kenneth Anger, Wong Kar-wai), photographers (Horst, Weegee, David Bailey), DJs (Andrew Weatherall) places (Paris in the Twenties, Muscle Shoals) and things (sunglasses, Levis, the pork pie hat).

The stories in this collection are sharply written, often surprising and a pertinent reminder that most of the people (and things) of lasting significance are those who don’t play by the rules. With brand new work and revitalised articles from the Chris Sullivan archives, Rebel Rebel will amuse, fascinate and inspire your inner rebel for years to come.

Dark Mirror

Barton Gellman

Barton Gellman’s informant called himself ‘Verax’ – the truth-teller. It was only later that Verax unmasked himself as Edward Snowden. By that point he had already shared thousands of files with Gellman.

Dark Mirror is the ultimate inside account of the vast, global surveillance network that now pervades all our lives. Gellman’s primary role in bringing Snowden’s revelations to light, for which he shared the Pulitzer prize, is only the beginning of this gripping real-life spy story. Snowden unlocked the door: here Gellman describes what he found on the other side over the course of a years-long journey of investigation. It is also the story of his own escalating battle against unknown digital adversaries after he discovered his own name on a file in the NSA document trove and realised that he himself was under attack.

Through a gripping narrative of paranoia, clandestine operations and jaw-dropping revelations, Dark Mirror delineates in full for the first time the hidden superstructure that connects government espionage with Silicon Valley and the most powerful corporation whose name you’ve never heard. Who is spying on us and why? Here are the answers.

Gimson's Prime Ministers

Andrew Gimson

A concise, sharp-witted and illuminating account of the lives of Britain’s Prime Ministers from Walpole to May (and beyond), illustrated by Martin Rowson

Gimson’s Prime Ministers provides the perfect follow-up to Andrew Gimson’s best-selling Gimson’s Kings and Queens, offering acerbic and wonderfully funny portraits of the fifty-two men (and two women) who have led our government for the last three centuries.

From Walpole to May (but possibly not for long…), Gimson elucidates with his trademark wit, brevity and brilliant eye for vivid detail the lives and times of the personalities who have shaped our modern political landscape.

Discover the leaders who have risen to the top, outfought opponents, slipped in silently and upturned precept and principle, and unearth the enduring qualities that unite all prime ministers: courage, eloquence, hunger for power, acuity, respectability, financial mastery, the ability to distribute patronage (keep those colleagues happy), the capacity for hard work, a different style to the predecessor and of course… vulnerability, for a free people will not tolerate a tyrant, and soon enough needs a scapegoat for whatever has gone wrong. These are individuals who must be at once ordinary and extraordinary, conventional and innovative, safe and audacious, banal and brilliant, on the side of the wider public but able to form a team out of members of the elite.

For the reader who has heard of such giants as Gladstone and Disraeli, and has drunk in a pub called the Palmerston, but has only the haziest idea of who these people were, Gimson’s Prime Ministers offers a short account of them all which can be read for pleasure, and not just for edification. With Gimson’s wonderful prose once again complemented by Martin Rowson’s inimitable illustrations, this lively and entertaining aide-memoire and work of satirical genius brings our parliamentary history to life as never before.

I An Distracted by Everything

Liza Tarbuck

The first annual for adults of it's kind.

Combining the spirit of Britain's much-loved Bunty and Judy annuals with the humour of the Python classic Bert Fegg's Nasty Book for Boys and Girls, I An Distracted By Everything is a book to pour over, ponder on and laugh uproariously with.

'If anyone can get the nation to squeal along with delight, it's Liza Tarbuck' Radio Times

'Liza Tarbuck is the kind of best friend every girl wishes she had' Observer

'Liza Tarbuck is in my top five women in the world' Dawn French

'Liza Tarbuck is a national treasure' Sue Perkins

Liza Tarbuck is one of the country's best-known faces. Her popularity has grown with a mixture of both TV and radio presenting and acting, in both comedy and drama. In 2012 she took over the Saturday-evening slot on Radio 2. She is a regular guest on Just a Minute, QI and has guest-hosted Have I Got News For You. This is her first book.

Tattoo Street Style

Alice Snape

Tattoo Street Style features 450 original and striking portraits of tattooed people from all over the world and their amazing body art. Showcasing all the artists, studios and styles you should know about, curated from within the tattoo community by Alice Snape of Things & Ink magazine.

Features profiles and interviews with some of the world’s most creative and exciting artists and studios.

Also includes comprehensive infographic-style directories; perfect if you’re looking for inspiration, whether for your first or fiftieth tattoo.

Object-Oriented Ontology

Graham Harman

We humans tend to believe that things are only real in as much as we perceive them, an idea reinforced by modern philosophy, which privileges us as special, radically different in kind from all other objects. But as Graham Harman, one of the theory's leading exponents, shows, Object-Oriented Ontology (OOO) rejects the idea of human specialness: the world, he states, is clearly not the world as manifest to humans. 'To think a reality beyond our thinking is not nonsense, but obligatory.'

At OOO's heart is the idea that objects - whether real, fictional, natural, artificial, human or non-human - are mutually autonomous. This core idea has significance for nearly every field of inquiry which is concerned in some way with the systematic interaction of objects, and the degree to which individual objects resist full participation in such systems.

In this brilliant new introduction, Graham Harman lays out OOO's history, ideas and impact, taking in art and literature, politics and natural science along the way.

The Entrepreneurial State

Mariana Mazzucato

'Superb ... At a time when government action of any kind is ideologically suspect, and entrepreneurship is unquestioningly lionized, the book's importance cannot be understated' Guardian

According to conventional wisdom, innovation is best left to the dynamic entrepreneurs of the private sector, and government should get out of the way. But what if all this was wrong? What if, from Silicon Valley to medical breakthroughs, the public sector has been the boldest and most valuable risk-taker of all?

'A brilliant book' Martin Wolf, Financial Times

'One of the most incisive economic books in years' Jeff Madrick, New York Review of Books

'Mazzucato is right to argue that the state has played a central role in producing game-changing breakthroughs' Economist

'Read her book. It will challenge your thinking' Forbes

Rude

Nimko Ali

'I started my period at home in the afternoon aged 14 on a warm day. I remember screaming and thinking "There is no doubt about it; I am definitely going to die".'

This book is about vaginas. Fanny, cunt, flower, foo-foo, tuppence, whatever you want to call it almost half of the world's population has one.

Was Jessica Ennis on her period they day she won Olympic Gold? What do you do when you're living on the streets and pregnant? What does it feeling like to have a poo after you've given birth? We all have questions but it's not seen as very polite to talk about our fanny; in fact it is down-right rude.

Rude is an important, taboo-breaking book that shares the stories of pregnancy and periods, orgasms and the menopause, from women from all walks of life. From refugee camps in Calais to Oscar-winning actresses, to Nimko's own story of living with FGM, each woman shares their own relationship with their vagina and its impact on their life.

The Magical Fantastical Fridge

Harlan Coben (and others)

#1 New York Times bestselling novelist Harlan Coben partners with a talented debut illustrator in this fantastical and funny adventure for fans of David Wiesner and William Joyce.

Have you ever noticed how magical your family fridge is?

Neither has Walden...until now.

Suddenly he finds himself transported into one of his own drawings on the fridge as he begins an unforgettable adventure.

He'll battle a crayon monster, catch an airplane ride into an old photo, escape a troop of monkeys and much more. All of the items displayed there have come alive to bring him a new understanding of his big, busy family.

You'll love studying the dynamic, detailed illustrations in this zany, surprise-filled journey that culminates in a heartfelt appreciation of those closest to us.

Voices

Nick Coleman

Food. Shelter. Warmth. Love.

Voices.

Other people’s voices, singing – the fifth essential necessity of life.

Nick Coleman’s new book is an exploration of what singing means and how it works and what it achieves. What does it do to us to listen hard and habitually to somebody else’s singing? And why is the singing of others so essential to human life? Why do we love it so? How are we shaped?

The book asks many other questions too. What was Roy Orbison’s problem? Who does Joni Mitchell think she is? Why did Jagger and Lennon sing like that (and not like this)? What did Aretha Franklin do to deserve the title ‘Queen of Soul’? For that matter, what is “soul’? What is the point of crooning? What does it say about you if Frank Sinatra leaves you cold? Billie, Janis, Amy: must the voices of anguish always dissolve into spectacle? And why isn’t the world better acquainted with Gladys Horton?

The history of post-war popular music is traditionally told sociologically or in terms of musicological influence and innovation in style. Sometimes the story is biographical, sometimes fashion conscious. Often it simply follows the money or the celebrity of its stars.

Voices takes a different tack. In ten discrete but cohering essays Coleman tackles the arc of that history as if it were an emotional experience with real psychological consequences – as chaotic, random, challenging and unpredictable as life itself. It is the story of what it is to listen and learn. Above all, it is a story of what it means to feel.

Brit(ish)

Afua Hirsch

Afua Hirsch is British. Her parents are British. She was raised, educated and socialised in Britain. Her partner, daughter, sister and the vast majority of her friends are British. So why is her identity and sense of belonging a subject of debate? The reason is simply because of the colour of her skin.

Blending history, memoir and individual experiences, Afua Hirsch reveals the identity crisis at the heart of Britain today. Far from affecting only minority people, Britain is a nation in denial about its past and its present. We believe we are the nation of abolition, but forget we are the nation of slavery. We sit proudly at the apex of the Commonwealth, but we flinch from the legacy of the Empire. We are convinced that fairness is one of our values, but that immigration is one of our problems.

Brit(ish) is the story of how and why this came to be, and an urgent call for change.

Sincere

Stephanie Davis

From musical theatre star to Celebrity Big Brother diva, a member of the Loose Women family, Stephanie has packed a lot into her life for someone so young – and she's just getting started. Not shy about talking frankly about her experiences and publically wearing her heart on her sleeve, Stephanie has kept the nation hooked, but she's also become a tabloid and weekly magazine queen.

For the very first time, Stephanie has decided to speak out and reveal the truth behind the headlines. In Sincere, she opens up about finding fame as an innocent young actress and witnessing the darker side of celebrity, laying bare her thoughts about hitting rock bottom, unravelling in public and triumphantly turning her life around for her baby.

In this heartfelt memoir, she also talks candidly about past relationships and the ups and downs of being in the spotlight.

Hearts And Minds

Jane Robinson (and others)

Set against the colourful background of the entire campaign for women to win the vote, Hearts and Minds tells the remarkable and inspiring story of the suffragists' march on London.

1913: the last long summer before the war. The country is gripped by suffragette fever. These impassioned crusaders have their admirers; some agree with their aims if not their forceful methods, while others are aghast at the thought of giving any female a vote.
Meanwhile, hundreds of women are stepping out on to the streets of Britain. They are the suffragists: non-militant campaigners for the vote, on an astonishing six-week protest march they call the Great Pilgrimage. Rich and poor, young and old, they defy convention, risking jobs, family relationships and even their lives to persuade the country to listen to them.
This is a story of ordinary people effecting extraordinary change. By turns dangerous, exhausting and exhilarating, the Great Pilgrimage transformed the personal and political lives of women in Britain for ever. Jane Robinson has drawn from diaries, letters and unpublished accounts to tell the inside story of the march, against the colourful background of the entire suffrage campaign. Fresh and original, full of vivid detail and moments of high drama, Hearts and Minds is both funny and incredibly moving, important and wonderfully entertaining.

Cuz

Danielle Allen

Cuz is the story of a young African American man’s coming-of-age, a tender tribute to a life lost, and a devastating analysis of a broken system.

Age 15 and living in LA, Michael Allen was arrested for a botched carjacking. Falling victim to the recently conceived three-strikes law, he was tried as an adult and sentenced to thirteen years behind bars. After growing up in prison Michael was released age 26, only to be murdered 3 years later by his ex-convict transsexual lover.

In this deeply personal yet clear-eyed memoir, Danielle Allen reconstructs her cousin’s life to try and understand how this tragedy was the end result. She investigates Michael’s upbringing in unstable circumstances, the events of his arrest and prosecution in the midst of the crime crackdown in LA, his coming of age in prison, and his attempts to make up for lost time after his release. With breathtaking intelligence and skill, Cuz circles around its subject, viewing it from all angles to expose a shocking reality.

The result is a both personal and analytical view of a life that is devastating and powerful. We become intimate with Michael’s life, from his first steps to his first love; we uncover the depths and complexities of his character that he kept secret from his family; we learn what it’s like to grow up in a city carved up by invisible gang borders; and we learn how we lost a generation.

Whilst this story is told through the prism of one individual, his life and death tell the story of many, many young black Americans. This is the new American tragedy.

Ancient Rhetoric

Thomas Habinek

A new and original anthology that introduces the key writings on rhetoric in the classical world, from Aristotle to Cicero and beyond.


Classical rhetoric is one of the earliest versions of what is today known as media studies. It was absolutely crucial to life in the ancient world, whether in the courtroom, the legislature or on ceremonial occasions, and was described as either the art of persuasion or the art of speaking well. This anthology, edited by Thomas Habinek, brings together all the most important ancient writings on rhetoric, including works by Cicero, Aristotle, Quintilian and Philostratus. Ranging across such themes as memory, persuasion, delivery and style, it provides a fascinating introduction to classical rhetoric and will be an invaluable sourcebook for students of the ancient world.

Ladybird Bedtime Treasury

Ladybird

This gorgeous Ladybird treasury of eight classic, traditional tales is guaranteed to delight and entertain young children. Each favourite fairy tale or story has been sensitively retold for modern readers and the mix of amazing animals, magical marvels and classic characters is perfect for both boys and girls.


The stories include Chicken Licken, Rapunzel, The Enormous Turnip, The Wizard of Oz, The Emperor's New Clothes, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Rumpelstiltskin and Heidi.