New and forthcoming

Rebel Rebel

Chris Sullivan

Escape the everyday humdrum with this exploration of iconic rebels from the past who became the biggest influencers of fashion, music and society by doing things their own way.

From the internationally bestselling author of Punk and founder of the legendary Wag Club in Soho, Rebel Rebel presents 60 pieces on outsiders. Like a really good party, it’s got musicians (Charlie Mingus, Fela Kuti, Joe Strummer), actors (Louise Brooks, Robert Mitchum, Daniel Day Lewis), artists (Egon Schiele, Man Ray, Jackson Pollock), directors (Fritz Lang, Kenneth Anger, Wong Kar-wai), photographers (Horst, Weegee, David Bailey), DJs (Andrew Weatherall) places (Paris in the Twenties, Muscle Shoals) and things (sunglasses, Levis, the pork pie hat).

The stories in this collection are sharply written, often surprising and a pertinent reminder that most of the people (and things) of lasting significance are those who don’t play by the rules. With brand new work and revitalised articles from the Chris Sullivan archives, Rebel Rebel will amuse, fascinate and inspire your inner rebel for years to come.

Dark Mirror

Barton Gellman

Barton Gellman’s informant called himself ‘Verax’ – the truth-teller. It was only later that Verax unmasked himself as Edward Snowden. By that point he had already shared thousands of files with Gellman.

Dark Mirror is the ultimate inside account of the vast, global surveillance network that now pervades all our lives. Gellman’s primary role in bringing Snowden’s revelations to light, for which he shared the Pulitzer prize, is only the beginning of this gripping real-life spy story. Snowden unlocked the door: here Gellman describes what he found on the other side over the course of a years-long journey of investigation. It is also the story of his own escalating battle against unknown digital adversaries after he discovered his own name on a file in the NSA document trove and realised that he himself was under attack.

Through a gripping narrative of paranoia, clandestine operations and jaw-dropping revelations, Dark Mirror delineates in full for the first time the hidden superstructure that connects government espionage with Silicon Valley and the most powerful corporation whose name you’ve never heard. Who is spying on us and why? Here are the answers.

I An Distracted by Everything

Liza Tarbuck

The first annual for adults of it's kind.

Combining the spirit of Britain's much-loved Bunty and Judy annuals with the humour of the Python classic Bert Fegg's Nasty Book for Boys and Girls, I An Distracted By Everything is a book to pour over, ponder on and laugh uproariously with.

'If anyone can get the nation to squeal along with delight, it's Liza Tarbuck' Radio Times

'Liza Tarbuck is the kind of best friend every girl wishes she had' Observer

'Liza Tarbuck is in my top five women in the world' Dawn French

'Liza Tarbuck is a national treasure' Sue Perkins

Liza Tarbuck is one of the country's best-known faces. Her popularity has grown with a mixture of both TV and radio presenting and acting, in both comedy and drama. In 2012 she took over the Saturday-evening slot on Radio 2. She is a regular guest on Just a Minute, QI and has guest-hosted Have I Got News For You. This is her first book.

Rude

Nimko Ali

'I started my period at home in the afternoon aged 14 on a warm day. I remember screaming and thinking "There is no doubt about it; I am definitely going to die".'

This book is about vaginas. Fanny, cunt, flower, foo-foo, tuppence, whatever you want to call it almost half of the world's population has one.

Was Jessica Ennis on her period they day she won Olympic Gold? What do you do when you're living on the streets and pregnant? What does it feeling like to have a poo after you've given birth? We all have questions but it's not seen as very polite to talk about our fanny; in fact it is down-right rude.

Rude is an important, taboo-breaking book that shares the stories of pregnancy and periods, orgasms and the menopause, from women from all walks of life. From refugee camps in Calais to Oscar-winning actresses, to Nimko's own story of living with FGM, each woman shares their own relationship with their vagina and its impact on their life.

Rabbit: A Memoir

Patricia Williams

That’s how things go in the ‘hood: It’s a never ending cycle of trouble, and once it grabs you, it won’t let go.

Patricia started life on the lowest rung of society: poor, black, and female. With an alcoholic for a mother and four siblings, she was raised on a steady diet of welfare, food stamps and cigarette smoke. By the age of 13 she had two children, and by the age of 16 she was one of Atlanta’s most successful crack dealers. Growing up in a family that had been stuck in the ghetto for generations, it seemed impossible Patricia would ever escape.

But when she was shot be a rival drug dealer in front her own children, Patricia made the life-changing decision to turn it all around. With a combination of grit, stubbornness, anger and love – and the kindness of others – she fought to break the cycle of poverty for the next generation. Now a stand-up comedian, she lives the maxim that the best healing comes through humour.

The Magical Fantastical Fridge

Harlan Coben (and others)

#1 New York Times bestselling novelist Harlan Coben partners with a talented debut illustrator in this fantastical and funny adventure for fans of David Wiesner and William Joyce.

Have you ever noticed how magical your family fridge is?

Neither has Walden...until now.

Suddenly he finds himself transported into one of his own drawings on the fridge as he begins an unforgettable adventure.

He'll battle a crayon monster, catch an airplane ride into an old photo, escape a troop of monkeys and much more. All of the items displayed there have come alive to bring him a new understanding of his big, busy family.

You'll love studying the dynamic, detailed illustrations in this zany, surprise-filled journey that culminates in a heartfelt appreciation of those closest to us.

Brit(ish)

Afua Hirsch

Afua Hirsch is British. Her parents are British. She was raised, educated and socialised in Britain. Her partner, daughter, sister and the vast majority of her friends are British. So why is her identity and sense of belonging a subject of debate? The reason is simply because of the colour of her skin.

Blending history, memoir and individual experiences, Afua Hirsch reveals the identity crisis at the heart of Britain today. Far from affecting only minority people, Britain is a nation in denial about its past and its present. We believe we are the nation of abolition, but forget we are the nation of slavery. We sit proudly at the apex of the Commonwealth, but we flinch from the legacy of the Empire. We are convinced that fairness is one of our values, but that immigration is one of our problems.

Brit(ish) is the story of how and why this came to be, and an urgent call for change.

Sincere

Stephanie Davis

From musical theatre star to Celebrity Big Brother diva, a member of the Loose Women family, Stephanie has packed a lot into her life for someone so young – and she's just getting started. Not shy about talking frankly about her experiences and publically wearing her heart on her sleeve, Stephanie has kept the nation hooked, but she's also become a tabloid and weekly magazine queen.

For the very first time, Stephanie has decided to speak out and reveal the truth behind the headlines. In Sincere, she opens up about finding fame as an innocent young actress and witnessing the darker side of celebrity, laying bare her thoughts about hitting rock bottom, unravelling in public and triumphantly turning her life around for her baby.

In this heartfelt memoir, she also talks candidly about past relationships and the ups and downs of being in the spotlight.

Hearts And Minds

Jane Robinson (and others)

Set against the colourful background of the entire campaign for women to win the vote, Hearts and Minds tells the remarkable and inspiring story of the suffragists' march on London.

1913: the last long summer before the war. The country is gripped by suffragette fever. These impassioned crusaders have their admirers; some agree with their aims if not their forceful methods, while others are aghast at the thought of giving any female a vote.
Meanwhile, hundreds of women are stepping out on to the streets of Britain. They are the suffragists: non-militant campaigners for the vote, on an astonishing six-week protest march they call the Great Pilgrimage. Rich and poor, young and old, they defy convention, risking jobs, family relationships and even their lives to persuade the country to listen to them.
This is a story of ordinary people effecting extraordinary change. By turns dangerous, exhausting and exhilarating, the Great Pilgrimage transformed the personal and political lives of women in Britain for ever. Jane Robinson has drawn from diaries, letters and unpublished accounts to tell the inside story of the march, against the colourful background of the entire suffrage campaign. Fresh and original, full of vivid detail and moments of high drama, Hearts and Minds is both funny and incredibly moving, important and wonderfully entertaining.

Chronicles of a Liquid Society

Umberto Eco

Umberto Eco was an international cultural superstar. A celebrated essayist as well as novelist, in this, his last collection, he explores many aspects of the modern world with irrepressible curiosity and wisdom.

A crisis in ideological values, a crisis in politics, unbridled individualism – the familiar backdrop to our lives: a ‘liquid society’ where it’s not easy to find a polestar, though stars and starlets are not lacking.

In these pieces, written by Eco as articles for his regular column in l’Espresso magazine, he brings his dazzling erudition and keen sense of the everyday to bear on topics such as popular culture and politics, being seen, conspiracies, the old and the young, mobile phones, mass media, racism, good manners and the crisis in ideological values. It is a final gift to his readers – astute, witty and illuminating.

You Can't Spell America Without Me

Alec Baldwin (and others)

Political satire as deeper truth: Donald Trump’s presidential memoir, as recorded by two world-renowned Trump scholars, and experts on greatness generally.

"I have the best words, beautiful words, as everybody has been talking and talking about for a long time. Also? The best sentences and, what do you call them, paragraphs. My previous books were great and sold extremely, unbelievably well--even the ones by dishonest, disgusting so-called journalists. But those writers didn't understand Trump, because quite frankly they were major losers. People say if you want it done right you have to do it yourself, even when 'it' is a 'memoir.' So every word of this book was written by me, using a special advanced word processing system during the many, many nights I've been forced to stay alone in the White House--only me, just me, trust me, nobody helped. And it's all 100% true, so true--people are already saying it may be the truest book ever published. Enjoy."

Until Donald Trump publishes his account of his entire four or eight or one-and-a-half years in the White House, the definitive chronicle will be You Can't Spell America Without Me: The Really Tremendous Inside Story of My Fantastic First Year As President.

He was elected because he was the most frank presidential candidate in history, a man always eager to tell the unvarnished truth about others' flaws as well as his own excellence. Now that refreshingly compulsive un-PC candor is applied to his time as leader of the free world. The mind-boggling private encounters with world leaders. The genius backroom strategy sessions with White House advisers. His triumphs over the dishonest news media. The historic, world-changing decisions--many of them secret until now. What he really thinks of Melania and Ivanka and Jared, Donald Jr. and Eric and the other one. And many spectacular, historic, exclusive photographs of him in private and public, making America great again.

Carrington's Letters

Dora Carrington (and others)

‘Your letters are a great pleasure. I lap them down with breakfast and they do me more good than tonics, blood capsules or iron jelloids’ Lytton Strachey

Dora Carrington was considered an outsider to Bloomsbury, but she lived right at its heart. Known only by her surname, she was the star of her year at the Slade School of Fine Art, but never achieved the fame her early career promised. For over a decade she was the companion of writer Lytton Strachey, and killed herself, stricken without him, when he died in 1932. She was also a prolific and exuberant correspondent.

Carrington was not consciously a pioneer or a feminist, but in her determination to live life according to her own nature – especially in relation to her work, her passionate friendships and her fluid attitude to sex, gender and sexuality – she fought battles that remain familiar and urgent today. She was friends with the greatest minds of the day and her correspondence stars a roster of fascinating characters – Virginia Woolf, Mark Gertler, Rosamund Lehmann, Maynard Keynes to name but a few.

Carrington’s Letters introduces the maverick artist and electric personality to a new generation for the first time with exclusive correspondence never before published. Unmediated, passionate, startlingly honest and very playful, reading Carrington’s letters is like having her whisper in your ear and embrace you gleefully.

Fear and Loathing on the Oche

King ADZ

Anyone who’s ever seen or attended the PDC World Darts Championships knows that darts is no ordinary sport. Where else would you find world-class superstars, in the midst of a championship match, cultivating tomorrow’s banging hangover? Or two separate organisations, with a bitter historical rivalry, taking potshots at each other in a bid to secure players, fans and an all-important TV broadcast contract?

And then there’s the fans… Darts fans are unlike any other fans in world sport. They drink the most, they wear the silliest costumes, they sing the loudest and yet they can arguably see the least live action. They feel an immense pride and ownership for the game – its theirs, and they couldn’t care less about the sneers from the mainstream.

Join King ADZ as he dives headfirst into this tempestuous world, meeting former legends, future stars, dominant Internationals, the owners, the referees and of course the fans. Darts may be a simple game to many, but to most it’s absolute mayhem.

Homer's Odyssey

Four Finger Discount

Remember when The Simpsons was the funniest show on television?

The Simpsons is the longest running comedy in history. Gracing our screens since 1989, with over 600 episodes, the show is a cultural phenomenon. Whilst it is still drawing huge ratings numbers, there is no argument that during the 90s the show was at its zenith.

No other comedy has had as big an impact on society. The Simpsons has influenced the way we communicate with each other. Niche quotes and references have become the secret handshake of millions around the world. In the course of this book, we remember the iconic characters – Hank Scorpio and Lionel Hutz, Rex Banner and Frank Grimes - and we dissect seminal episodes such as Cape Feare, Marge Vs the Monorail and Who Shot Mr. Burns.

From celebrity cameos to musical moments, from hidden jokes to insane trivia, this is the essential companion to golden age of The Simpsons. Homer’s Odyssey is a hilarious, intelligent and in-depth analysis of the greatest show on earth.

So grab yourself a Flaming Moe, settle in to your groove on the couch, and enjoy our guide to your favourite yellow family.

The Art of Fire

Daniel Hume

Fire can fascinate, inspire, capture the imagination and bring families and communities together.

It has the ability to amaze, energise and touch something deep inside all of us. For thousands of years, at every corner of the globe, humans have been huddling around fires: from the basic and primitive essentials of light, heat, energy and cooking, through to modern living, fire plays a central role in all of our lives.

The ability to accurately and quickly light a fire is one of the most important skills anyone setting off on a wilderness adventure could possess, yet very little has been written about it.

Through his narrative Hume also meditates on the wider topics surrounding fire and how it shapes the world around us.

The ‘Call Yourself British?’ Quiz Book

Michael Odell

When someone who is an immigrant to Britain wants to obtain UK Citizenship, after at least five years in the country, they have to jump through all sorts of hoops, including sassing an English test, as well as passing a test of multiple-choice questions, based on an official Home Office handbook called Life in the UK.

Unless you have studied and memorised that book, you would probably fail, even if you’re British born and bred. In a recent poll, 51% of British 18-24 year olds failed to reach the 75% pass level.

Sample questions:

· Do you know how many members of the Welsh Assembly there are?

· How many jury members in a Sheriff Court?

· The contents of the 1689 Bill of Rights?

· What the central shopping area of most towns is called? (Yes, really!)

· Who is/was Richard Arkwright, Sake Dean Mahomet, John Petts, or David Weir?


With Brexit and all the talk of sovereignty, the question of what it really means to be British has never been more important, so here is your chance to see how you measure up to what your country (or at least, some Whitehall civil servants) expects you to know. So here are 500 sample questions based on the Life in the UK book, to test yourself, or to play as a quiz with family or friends. The answers will inform, surprise and above all, make you laugh!