New and forthcoming

Rebel Rebel

Chris Sullivan

Escape the everyday humdrum with this exploration of iconic rebels from the past who became the biggest influencers of fashion, music and society by doing things their own way.

From the internationally bestselling author of Punk and founder of the legendary Wag Club in Soho, Rebel Rebel presents 60 pieces on outsiders. Like a really good party, it’s got musicians (Charlie Mingus, Fela Kuti, Joe Strummer), actors (Louise Brooks, Robert Mitchum, Daniel Day Lewis), artists (Egon Schiele, Man Ray, Jackson Pollock), directors (Fritz Lang, Kenneth Anger, Wong Kar-wai), photographers (Horst, Weegee, David Bailey), DJs (Andrew Weatherall) places (Paris in the Twenties, Muscle Shoals) and things (sunglasses, Levis, the pork pie hat).

The stories in this collection are sharply written, often surprising and a pertinent reminder that most of the people (and things) of lasting significance are those who don’t play by the rules. With brand new work and revitalised articles from the Chris Sullivan archives, Rebel Rebel will amuse, fascinate and inspire your inner rebel for years to come.

Dark Mirror

Barton Gellman

Barton Gellman’s informant called himself ‘Verax’ – the truth-teller. It was only later that Verax unmasked himself as Edward Snowden. By that point he had already shared thousands of files with Gellman.

Dark Mirror is the ultimate inside account of the vast, global surveillance network that now pervades all our lives. Gellman’s primary role in bringing Snowden’s revelations to light, for which he shared the Pulitzer prize, is only the beginning of this gripping real-life spy story. Snowden unlocked the door: here Gellman describes what he found on the other side over the course of a years-long journey of investigation. It is also the story of his own escalating battle against unknown digital adversaries after he discovered his own name on a file in the NSA document trove and realised that he himself was under attack.

Through a gripping narrative of paranoia, clandestine operations and jaw-dropping revelations, Dark Mirror delineates in full for the first time the hidden superstructure that connects government espionage with Silicon Valley and the most powerful corporation whose name you’ve never heard. Who is spying on us and why? Here are the answers.

Give People Money

Annie Lowrey

Surely just giving people money couldn't work. Or could it?

Imagine if every month the government deposited £1000 in your bank account, with no strings attached and nothing expected in return. It sounds crazy, but Universal Basic Income (UBI) has become one of the most influential policy ideas of our time. The founder of Facebook, Obama's chief economist, governments from Canada to Finland are all seriously debating some form of UBI.

In this sparkling and provocative book, economics writer Annie Lowrey looks at the global UBI movement. She travels to Kenya to see how UBI is lifting the poorest people on earth out of destitution, India to see how inefficient government programs are failing the poor, South Korea to interrogate UBI’s intellectual pedigree, and Silicon Valley to meet the tech titans financing UBI pilots in expectation of a world with advanced artificial intelligence and little need for human labour. She also examines at the challenges the movement faces: contradictory aims, uncomfortable costs, and most powerfully, the entrenched belief that no one should get something for nothing.

The UBI movement is not just an economic policy -- it also calls into question our deepest intuitions about what we owe each other and what activities society rewards and values.

Unseen

Reggie Yates

From Grange Hill to Top of the Pops, Reggie Yates has been on camera nearly all of his life, but it’s as a documentary filmmaker – and a pretty fearless one at that – where he has truly been making his mark, investigating everything from gun crime in Chicago, to life as a refugee in Iraq.

In his first book, Unseen, Reggie takes us behind the scenes on his journey from TV host to documentary storyteller. Using some of the key moments and extreme circumstances he has found himself in, Reggie examines what he has learned about the world, and himself as a person.

Beginning as a brief exploration of Reggie’s relationship with the camera and life growing up on screen, Unseen explores the journey Reggie has taken in the documentary world. Initially resistant to documentary making, Reggie was convinced his point of view as a young black working class man with a history in music, children’s TV and entertainment would not make his films remotely credible. Through conflict and challenges on screen, the understanding gained from the very thing once seen as a weakness would become his strength on camera, as the eye of the everyman and voice of the audience. Unseen unpicks the stories behind the fascinating characters and situations Reggie encounters across a series of films, as well as chronicling the personal growth through each testing shoot for Yates himself.

Biased

Jennifer Eberhardt

‘Jennifer Eberhardt gives us the opportunity to talk about race in new ways, ultimately transforming our thinking about ourselves and the world we want to create.’ Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow

‘Jennifer Eberhardt is one of the great thinkers and one of the great voices of our time.’ Carol Dweck, author of Mindset

‘Groundbreaking... essential reading for anyone interested in how we become a more just society.’ Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy

Professor Jennifer Eberhardt is a Stanford Social Psychologist and one of the world’s leading experts on racial bias. In Biased, she draws on groundbreaking research to demonstrate that even without explicit racism, our unconscious biases powerfully shape our behaviour leading to racial disparities in all sectors of society.

In a global society of increased migration and social movement, Biased highlights the social problems that arise when different races meet, and demonstrates the stubbornly persistent role of racial bias in a world where economic and geographic realities are rapidly changing.

Perhaps more importantly, Biased not only describes one of the most fundamental problems of our age, but puts forward solutions. Unconscious bias is a common human condition to be recognised and managed, not a sin to be punished. Only through understanding comes change.

On the Edge

Richard Davies

To understand how humans react and adapt to change we need to study people who live in harsh environments. From the death-row prisoners trading in prisons where money is banned to the stateless ethnic Russians shut out of Estonia’s hyper-modern economy, every life in this book has been hit by a seismic shock, violently broken or damaged in some way.
People living in these odd and marginal places are ignored by number crunching economists and political pollsters alike. Science suggests this is a mistake.
This book tells the personal stories of humans living in extreme situations. 'Extreme' does not mean the familiar stock market crashes, housing crises, or banking scandals of the financial pages. The book takes the reader to really odd places, the places that no-one visits. Places where part of the economy has been repressed, removed, destroyed or turbocharged. By travelling to each of them and discovering what life is really like, On the Edge tells small stories that shed light on today’s biggest economic questions.

No Way Out

Lauren Elysia

‘There’s not much to help girls over the age of consent. I was 18 the first time I was raped. I was 18 when I was serially and gang raped. I was over 18 when I was trafficked all over England and given to many men, sometimes as many as 10 in one night. Who could I go to for help?’

Lauren’s ordeal began when she was living in the YMCA, and she was violently inducted into an Asian sex ring. Traumatised and alone, she was too weak to try to escape or even tell anyone. Four years later, she had been passed around to over 70 men, was on drugs, and suffered with PTSD so severe she found herself on the edge of suicide. So when Operation Chalice came to recruit her, desperate to bring her abusers down, could she ever be strong enough to answer the call?

Modern Nature

Derek Jarman

Derek Jarman's garden at Dungeness draws thousands of visitors every year. It is a weird and windswept place, a small garden beside a humble cottage. But between the pebbles of the beach Jarman grew all manner of plants – some were burnt by wind and sea-spray, whilst others flourished creating brilliant, unexpected beauty in the wilderness. A filmmaker, writer and icon of his day, Jarman explores through this exquisite diary of his garden the nature of art, politics, life and death.

Happiness

Edith Hall

What’s the secret to long-term happiness? Should we be minimalists, or should we be more hygge? Is the key to life fitting in 10 minutes of mindfulness before work?

Long before we were puzzling these existential questions, one of the greatest thinkers in history was dedicating his life to the human quest for happiness.

Aristotle is the father of modern thinking and the forefather of self-help who pondered many of the challenges that still cause us trouble today:

How do I decide what career path to take?
How do I overcome grief?
How do I choose a partner?
And how do I live a good life?

In this handbook to Aristotle’s timeless teachings, Professor Edith Hall shows how a return to ancient thinking might be just what the modern world needs. In ten key lessons that guide us from birth to the end of life, Happiness turns to the greatest mind in history to arm you with the knowledge you need to live a good life.

This is advice that won’t go out of fashion.

Rude

Nimko Ali

This book is about vaginas. Fanny, cunt, flower, foo-foo, tuppence, whatever you want to call it, almost half of the world's population has one.

Was Jessica Ennis on her period they day she won Olympic Gold? What do you do when you're living on the streets and pregnant? What does it feel like to have a poo after you've given birth? We all have questions, but it's not seen as very polite to talk about our fanny; in fact it is downright rude.

Rude is an important, taboo-breaking book that shares the stories of pregnancy and periods, orgasms and the menopause, from women from all walks of life. From refugee camps in Calais to Oscar-winning actresses, to Nimko's own story of living with FGM, each woman shares their own relationship with their vagina and its impact on their life.

First, We Make the Beast Beautiful

Sarah Wilson

Sarah Wilson gravitates to life’s problems, passing on her hard-earned wisdoms to all who want to make life better. Having helped over 1.5m people across the world to quit sugar, in first, we make the beast beautiful she now turns her intense focus and fierce investigatory skills onto the lifetime companion that’s brought her the most pain and become her finest teacher. Anxiety.

Looking at the triggers and treatments, fashions and fads, she reads widely, interviewing fellow sufferers, mental health patients, philosophers, and even the Dalai Lama, processing all she learns through the prism of her own experience. She pulls at the thread of accepted definitions of anxiety, unravelling the notion that it is a disease that must be medicated into submission. Could anxiety be re-sewn, she asks, into a thing of beauty?

There are many books about coping with anxiety. This one encourages the myriad sufferers of the world's most common mental illness to thrive with anxiety, and even to delight in the possibilities it offers for a richer, fuller life.

Practical, poetic, wise and funny, this is a small book with a big heart.

A Spy Named Orphan

Roland Philipps

Donald Maclean is the most infamous of Britain’s twentieth-century spies, a double agent who defected to the Soviet Union, and whose betrayal plunged the Cold War alliance between Britain and the United States into crisis.

Part of the ‘Cambridge Five’, Maclean was a true ideologue and the most complex and compelling character of the group. Making use of previously classified material from the SIS and Foreign Office archives, Roland Philipps unravels the man and his many contradictions: a childhood and upbringing filled with strictures; an adult life of repressions, deceptions and binges; a marriage complicated by secrets of its own; and a looming sense of his fate closing in on him.

Taking us back to the golden age of espionage, A Spy Named Orphan examines the character, motivation and impact of the most ardent, dangerous and enigmatic spy of the twentieth century. At the same time it illuminates the changes in world power after the Second World War, tracing the decline of American and British relations as well as the growing chill of the Cold War that brought us to the verge of catastrophe.

Never miss a story...

Join us to receive the best-read newsletter