New and forthcoming

Rebel Rebel

Chris Sullivan

Escape the everyday humdrum with this exploration of iconic rebels from the past who became the biggest influencers of fashion, music and society by doing things their own way.

From the internationally bestselling author of Punk and founder of the legendary Wag Club in Soho, Rebel Rebel presents 60 pieces on outsiders. Like a really good party, it’s got musicians (Charlie Mingus, Fela Kuti, Joe Strummer), actors (Louise Brooks, Robert Mitchum, Daniel Day Lewis), artists (Egon Schiele, Man Ray, Jackson Pollock), directors (Fritz Lang, Kenneth Anger, Wong Kar-wai), photographers (Horst, Weegee, David Bailey), DJs (Andrew Weatherall) places (Paris in the Twenties, Muscle Shoals) and things (sunglasses, Levis, the pork pie hat).

The stories in this collection are sharply written, often surprising and a pertinent reminder that most of the people (and things) of lasting significance are those who don’t play by the rules. With brand new work and revitalised articles from the Chris Sullivan archives, Rebel Rebel will amuse, fascinate and inspire your inner rebel for years to come.

Rude

Nimko Ali

'I started my period at home in the afternoon aged 14 on a warm day. I remember screaming and thinking "There is no doubt about it; I am definitely going to die".'

This book is about vaginas. Fanny, cunt, flower, foo-foo, tuppence, whatever you want to call it almost half of the world's population has one.

Was Jessica Ennis on her period they day she won Olympic Gold? What do you do when you're living on the streets and pregnant? What does it feeling like to have a poo after you've given birth? We all have questions but it's not seen as very polite to talk about our fanny; in fact it is down-right rude.

Rude is an important, taboo-breaking book that shares the stories of pregnancy and periods, orgasms and the menopause, from women from all walks of life. From refugee camps in Calais to Oscar-winning actresses, to Nimko's own story of living with FGM, each woman shares their own relationship with their vagina and its impact on their life.

The Choice

Edith Eger

In 1944, sixteen-year-old Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz. There she endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. Over the coming months, Edith’s bravery helped her sister to survive, and led to her bunkmates rescuing her during a death march. When their camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.

In The Choice, Dr Edith Eger shares her experience of the Holocaust and the remarkable stories of those she has helped ever since. Today, she is an internationally acclaimed psychologist whose patients include survivors of abuse and soldiers suffering from PTSD. She explains how many of us live within a mind that has become a prison, and shows how freedom becomes possible once we confront our suffering.

Like Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning, The Choice is life changing. Warm, compassionate and infinitely wise, it is a profound examination of the human spirit, and our capacity to heal.

Streampunks

Robert Kyncl (and others)

The rules of entertainment have changed. Last year, the vlogger PewDiePie made more money from his YouTube videos than high profile movie stars such as Meryl Streep, Cameron Diaz and Anne Hathaway. And no one knows more about how it works than Robert Kyncl, Chief Business Officer at YouTube.

Youtube is the first truly global media platform, reaching 87% of all online adults in the UK. Streampunks not only tells the inside story about who and what we watch on our screens, but also the new ways that students are taught; how minorities are thought of, depicted and treated; how small businesses advertise; the way Hollywood scouts talent and formats its shows; the ways brands advertise; the way music is discovered and consumed; and the way stories are told.

This book is for the legions of creative people who want to learn how to become the next youtube stars. It’s for the members of legacy media who want to understand where the future is headed. And it’s for all those who love good storytelling about the people who influence how we are entertained, educated and inspired.


Streampunks will the definitive book on Youtube, the new platform changing the face of entertainment.

Rabbit: A Memoir

Patricia Williams

That’s how things go in the ‘hood: It’s a never ending cycle of trouble, and once it grabs you, it won’t let go.

Patricia started life on the lowest rung of society: poor, black, and female. With an alcoholic for a mother and four siblings, she was raised on a steady diet of welfare, food stamps and cigarette smoke. By the age of 13 she had two children, and by the age of 16 she was one of Atlanta’s most successful crack dealers. Growing up in a family that had been stuck in the ghetto for generations, it seemed impossible Patricia would ever escape.

But when she was shot be a rival drug dealer in front her own children, Patricia made the life-changing decision to turn it all around. With a combination of grit, stubbornness, anger and love – and the kindness of others – she fought to break the cycle of poverty for the next generation. Now a stand-up comedian, she lives the maxim that the best healing comes through humour.

I An Distracted by Everything

Liza Tarbuck

Part annual, part musing on life, half comedy sketch and half hilarious anecdote, this is a book to pour over, ponder on and laugh uproariously with.

Combining the spirit of a Bunty or Judy annual with the creativity of Wreck This Journal and the current trend for mindfulness, I An Distracted by Everything is overflowing with interesting stories, distinctive facts, gorgeous images, crafty know how and amusing asides.

Leviathan

Thomas Hobbes (and others)

This new Penguin Classics edition of one of the great masterpieces of seventeenth-century English prose is based on a thoroughly corrected text and includes a major new introduction.

Thomas Hobbes lived through the Thirty Years War and Britain's civil wars, and the trauma of these events led to his great masterpiece of political thought, Leviathan. How could humankind rescue itself from life in the natural state, which was 'poor, nasty, brutish and short'? What form of politics would provide the security that he and his contemporaries craved?

Vilified and scorned from the moment it was published, Leviathan was publicly burnt for sedition, but ever since it has exercised a unique fascination on its readers, both for its ideas and its remarkable prose. Its concepts helped to drag Europe into a new world - one in which we still live today.

The Meteorologist

Olivier Rolin (and others)

Alexei is the highly respected head of the Soviet Union’s meteorology department. He is also a loving family man, devoted to his wife and his four-year-old daughter Eleonora. But one fateful morning in 1934, less than a year after being hailed by Stalin as a national hero, Alexi is suddenly arrested and exiled to a gulag. With thousands of other political prisoners, he spends his remaining years on an island in the frozen north, under vast skies and surrounded by water that was, for more than six months of the year, a sheet of motionless ice.

Olivier Rolin masterfully pieces together Alexei’s story and his eventual horrifying fate, drawing on an archive of letters and beautiful drawings of the natural world which Alexei sent home to his family. The Meteorologist is the fascinating and deeply moving account of an innocent man caught up in the brutality of Soviet paranoia.

Things Fall Apart

John O'Farrell

'…as the Labour candidate I prepared for every possible question on the local radio Election Phone-In. What I had not prepared for was my mum ringing up to say that she agreed with John O’Farrell. On EVERYTHING.'

Things Fall Apart is the personal story of one political activist helping Labour progress from its 1997 landslide to the unassailable position it enjoys today.
Along the way, he stood for Parliament against Theresa May but failed to step into her shoes; he was dropped from Tony and Cherie’s Christmas card list after he revealed he always sent their card on to a friend from the SWP; and he campaigned for a new non-selective inner-city state school, then realised this meant he had to send his kids to a non-selective inner-city state school.

The long-awaited sequel to the best-selling Things Can Only Get Better is for everyone who could use a good laugh after Brexit, Boris and Trump. A roller-coaster ride through the last two decades via the very best political jokes (excluding the ones that keep getting elected).

Make Your Mind Up

Bethany Mota

When Bethany first propped her camera on a stack of books and pressed record in 2009, she didn't realise her life was about to change—forever. After uploading her first video to YouTube at just thirteen years old, Bethany quickly became one of the Internet's go-to beauty, style, and lifestyle vlogger. Since then, she has filmed countless room tours and tutorials, travelled the world, experimented with hundreds of DIYs, designed her own clothing line, gone on an international tour, competed on Dancing with the Stars, and created health, beauty, and wellness content for multiple platforms.

But before Bethany found her #MotaFam online, life wasn't looking so great: After being intensely bullied in school, the already shy Bethany retreated further into her shell, suffering from crippling anxiety and a lack of self-confidence she just couldn’t shake. From growing up on a dairy farm in small-town Los Banos, California, to figuring out how to overcome anxiety and find her voice, to finally breaking out of her shell and learning to forge her own positive path, Make Your Mind Up is more than just a heartwarming memoir or lifestyle guide—this is a portrait of Bethany’s life, exactly how she lives it.

Dark Mirror

Barton Gellman

Barton Gellman’s informant called himself ‘Verax’ – the truth-teller. It was only later that Verax unmasked himself as Edward Snowden. By that point he had already shared thousands of files with Gellman.

Dark Mirror is the ultimate inside account of the vast, global surveillance network that now pervades all our lives. Gellman’s primary role in bringing Snowden’s revelations to light, for which he shared the Pulitzer prize, is only the beginning of this gripping real-life spy story. Snowden unlocked the door: here Gellman describes what he found on the other side over the course of a years-long journey of investigation. It is also the story of his own escalating battle against unknown digital adversaries after he discovered his own name on a file in the NSA document trove and realised that he himself was under attack.

Through a gripping narrative of paranoia, clandestine operations and jaw-dropping revelations, Dark Mirror delineates in full for the first time the hidden superstructure that connects government espionage with Silicon Valley and the most powerful corporation whose name you’ve never heard. Who is spying on us and why? Here are the answers.

The Fall of the House of Fifa

David Conn

When Sepp Blatter joined Fifa in 1975 it had just twelve employees. Forty years later, the FBI have accused 14 executives of 47 counts of money laundering, racketeering and tax evasion linked to alleged kickbacks totalling more than $150m. Football has become the premier global sport, a television and commercial powerhouse, while Fifa, the organisation which runs it, turned bad.

The crumbling of Fifa and the shock resignation of Blatter days after his re-election in June 2015 is the most spectacular story of corruption sport has ever seen. There are international investigations into alleged bribery and fraud committed by some of Fifa’s top executives, and the deeply murky vote surrounding the awarding of the 2018 and 2022 World Cup tournaments to Russia and Qatar is under sharp scrutiny, with criminal investigations under way in the US and Switzerland.

This is a story of globalisation, of the changing geography of wealth and power, of how a most beloved of sports could be so rotten at the top. David Conn writes the definitive account of Fifa’s rise and fall, the key, larger-than-life personalities and power-brokers responsible for it, told with a love of the game.

The Magical Fantastical Fridge

Harlan Coben (and others)

#1 New York Times bestselling novelist Harlan Coben partners with a talented debut illustrator in this fantastical and funny adventure for fans of David Wiesner and William Joyce.

Have you ever noticed how magical your family fridge is?

Neither has Walden...until now.

Suddenly he finds himself transported into one of his own drawings on the fridge as he begins an unforgettable adventure.

He'll battle a crayon monster, catch an airplane ride into an old photo, escape a troop of monkeys and much more. All of the items displayed there have come alive to bring him a new understanding of his big, busy family.

You'll love studying the dynamic, detailed illustrations in this zany, surprise-filled journey that culminates in a heartfelt appreciation of those closest to us.

The Promised Land

André Naffis-Sahely

Flitting from the mud-soaked floors of Venice to the glittering, towering constructions of the Abu Dhabi of his childhood and early adulthood, from the 'disposable cities' composed of shanty towns and rough encampments which spring up wherever new resources are discovered to present-day London and North America, André Naffis-Sahely's bracingly plain-spoken first collection gathers portraits of promised lands and those who go in search of them: travellers, labourers, dreamers; the hopeful and the dispossessed. This is poetry as reportage, as much an act of memory as of sinuous, clear-eyed vision. As this arresting new poet has remarked elsewhere: "I don't like poems that invent memories; I have enough of my own."

Bread for All

Chris Renwick

Today, everybody seems to agree that something has gone badly wrong with the British welfare state. In the midst of economic crisis, politicians and commentators talk about benefits as a lifestyle choice, and of "skivers" living off hard-working "strivers" as they debate what a welfare state fit for the twenty-first century might look like.

This major new history tells the story of one the greatest transformations in British intellectual, social and political life: the creation of the welfare state, from the Victorian workhouse, where you had to be destitute to receive help, to a moment just after the Second World War, when government embraced responsibilities for people's housing, education, health and family life, a commitment that was unimaginable just a century earlier. Though these changes were driven by developments in different and sometimes unexpected currents in British life, they were linked by one over-arching idea: that through rational and purposeful intervention, government can remake society. It was an idea that, during the early twentieth century, came to inspire people across the political spectrum. Not only could poverty be conquered, but the policies used to do so could produce better citizens who would in turn create a modern and dynamic Britain. In exploring this extraordinary transformation, Bread for All explores and challenges our assumptions about what the welfare state was originally for, and the kinds of people who were involved in creating it. In doing so, it asks what the idea of the welfare state continues to mean for us today.

First Confession

Chris Patten

Chris Patten was a cradle Catholic (hence the title), became one of the most prominent Tory 'Wets' of the 1980s and 1990s, and went on to hold a series of prominent public offices - Chairman of the Conservative Party, the last Governor of Hong Kong, European Commissioner for External Affairs, Chancellor of Oxford University, Chairman of the BBC, advisor to the Pope - as he self-deprecatingly puts it 'a Grand Poo-bah, the Lord High Everything Else'. He writes with wry humour about his time in all these offices, taking us behind the scenes and showing us unexpected sides of many of the great figures of the day. In exploring his own identity he also examines the dangers of identity politics, which he encountered in several of his jobs, from Northern Ireland to Asia and the Middle East. No politician now writing is so purely enjoyable as Chris Patten.

Non-fiction

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