New and forthcoming

Stop Looking at Your Phone

Son of Alan


Haven't you got something better to do?

Our streets are filled with down-facing zombies, blocking up the pavements.
We’d rather Instagram our food than eat it.
We've forgotten how to have real actual conversations .
And in the bedroom… well, that’s no place for Candy Crush Saga.

It’s time we all repeated the life-changing maxim: STOP LOOKING AT YOUR PHONE.

In his wonderfully deadpan instruction manual for our increasingly tunnel-visioned lives, illustrator Son of Alan taps into the strange truth of our obsession with the tiny screen. Revealing how ludicrous we've all become, and what wonders lie in stall for us a whole metre from our faces, this book will make you want to reclaim your life, your friends and your family from the tyranny of the backlit screen. You’ll laugh, sure, but it might also change your life.

The Choice

Edith Eger

THE AWARDWINNING INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER

'One of those rare and eternal stories you don't want to end and that leave you forever changed' - Desmond Tutu

'A masterpiece of holocaust literature. Her memoir, like her life, is extraordinary, harrowing and inspiring in equal measure' – The Times Literary Supplement

'Little dancer', Mengele says, ‘dance for me’

In 1944, sixteen-year-old ballerina Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz. Separated from her parents on arrival, she endures unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. When the camp is finally liberated, she is pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive.

The horrors of the Holocaust didn't break Edith. In fact, they helped her learn to live again with a life-affirming strength and a truly remarkable resilience.

The Choice is her unforgettable story. It shows that hope can flower in the most unlikely places.

House of Trump, House of Putin

Craig Unger

House of Trump, House of Putin offers the first comprehensive investigation into the decades-long relationship among Donald Trump, Vladimir Putin, and the Russian Mafia that ultimately helped win Trump the White House.

It is a chilling story that begins in the 1970s, when Trump made his first splash in the booming, money-drenched world of New York real estate, and ends with Trump’s inauguration as president of the United States. That moment was the culmination of Vladimir Putin’s long mission to undermine Western democracy, a mission that he and his hand-selected group of oligarchs and associates had ensnared Trump in, starting more than twenty years ago with the massive bailout of a string of sensational Trump hotel and casino failures in Atlantic City. This book confirms the most incredible American paranoias about Russian malevolence.

To most, it will be a hair-raising revelation that the Cold War did not end in 1991—that it merely evolved, with Trump’s apartments offering the perfect vehicle for billions of dollars to leave the collapsing Soviet Union. In House of Trump, House of Putin, Craig Unger methodically traces the deep-rooted alliance between the highest echelons of American political operatives and the biggest players in the frightening underworld of the Russian Mafia. He traces Donald Trump’s sordid ascent from foundering real estate tycoon to leader of the free world. He traces Russia’s phoenixlike rise from the ashes of the post–Cold War Soviet Union as well as its ceaseless covert efforts to retaliate against the West and reclaim its status as a global superpower.

Without Trump, Russia would have lacked a key component in its attempts to return to imperial greatness. Without Russia, Trump would not be president. This essential book is crucial to understanding the real powers at play in the shadows of today’s world.

The Hungry Empire

Lizzie Collingham

'A wholly pleasing book, which offers a tasty side dish to anyone exploring the narrative history of the British Empire' Max Hastings, Sunday Times

WINNER OF THE GUILD OF FOOD WRITERS BOOK AWARD 2018

The glamorous daughter of an African chief shares a pineapple with a slave trader… Surveyors in British Columbia eat tinned Australian rabbit… Diamond prospectors in Guyana prepare an iguana curry…

In twenty meals The Hungry Empire tells the story of how the British created a global network of commerce and trade in foodstuffs that moved people and plants from one continent to another, reshaping landscapes and culinary tastes. The Empire allowed Britain to harness the globe’s edible resources from cod fish and salt beef to spices, tea and sugar.

Lizzie Collingham takes us on a wide-ranging culinary journey, revealing how virtually every meal we eat still contains a taste of empire.

Red Thread

Charlotte Higgins

**BBC RADIO 4 BOOK OF THE WEEK**

The tale of how the hero Theseus killed the Minotaur, finding his way out of the labyrinth using Ariadne’s ball of red thread, is one of the most intriguing, suggestive and persistent of all myths, and the labyrinth – the beautiful, confounding and terrifying building created for the half-man, half-bull monster – is one of the foundational symbols of human ingenuity and artistry.

Charlotte Higgins, author of the Baillie Gifford-shortlisted Under Another Sky, tracks the origins of the story of the labyrinth in the poems of Homer, Catullus, Virgil and Ovid, and with them builds an ingenious edifice of her own. She follows the idea of the labyrinth through the Cretan excavations of Sir Arthur Evans, the mysterious turf labyrinths of Northern Europe, the church labyrinths of medieval French cathedrals and the hedge mazes of Renaissance gardens. Along the way, she traces the labyrinthine ideas of writers from Dante and Borges to George Eliot and Conan Doyle, and of artists from Titian and Velázquez to Picasso and Eva Hesse.

Her intricately constructed narrative asks what it is to be lost, what it is to find one’s way, and what it is to travel the confusing and circuitous path of a lived life. Red Thread is, above all, a winding and unpredictable route through the byways of the author’s imagination – one that leads the reader on a strange and intriguing journey, full of unexpected connections and surprising pleasures.

Bread for All

Chris Renwick

SHORTLISTED FOR THE LONGMAN-HISTORY TODAY PRIZE 2018
LONGLISTED FOR THE ORWELL PRIZE 2018

'Makes a gripping human story out of the wisest and most progressive policy achievement of any government in the history of the world ... the welfare state deserves books this good' Stuart Maconie, New Statesman, Books of the Year

'A brilliant book, full of little revelations' Jon Cruddas, Prospect

'Carefully argued, deftly balanced and wittily written, with countless lovely details' Dominic Sandbrook, Sunday Times

A landmark book from a remarkable new historian, on a subject that has never been more important - or imperilled

Today, everybody seems to agree that something has gone badly wrong with the British welfare state. In the midst of economic crisis, politicians and commentators talk about benefits as a lifestyle choice, and of 'skivers' living off hard-working 'strivers' as they debate what a welfare state fit for the twenty-first century might look like.

This major new history tells the story of one the greatest transformations in British intellectual, social and political life: the creation of the welfare state, from the Victorian workhouse, where you had to be destitute to receive help, to a moment just after the Second World War, when government embraced responsibilities for people's housing, education, health and family life, a commitment that was unimaginable just a century earlier. Though these changes were driven by developments in different and sometimes unexpected currents in British life, they were linked by one over-arching idea: that through rational and purposeful intervention, government can remake society. It was an idea that, during the early twentieth century, came to inspire people across the political spectrum.

In exploring this extraordinary transformation, Bread for All explores and challenges our assumptions about what the welfare state was originally for, and the kinds of people who were involved in creating it. In doing so, it asks what the idea continues to mean for us today.

The Tulip Touch

Anne Fine

Reissued for the Originals series of powerful teen fiction.

Nobody wants Tulip in their gang.

She skives off school, cheeks the teachers and makes herself unpopular with her classmates by telling awful lies.

None of this matters to Natalie who finds Tulip exciting.

At first she doesn't care that other people are upset and unnerved by Tulip's bizarre games, but as the games become increasingly sinister and dangerous, Natalie realises that Tulip is going too far.

Much too far.

Racing, in fact, to the novel's shocking ending.

No Logo

Naomi Klein (and others)

Penguin presents No Logo by Naomi Klein, read by Nicola Barber


No logo employs journalistic savvy and personal testament to detail the insidious practices and far-reaching effects of corporate marketing - and the powerful potential of a growing activist sect that will surely alter the course of the 21st Century. This is an infuriating, inspiring, and altogether pioneering work of cultural criticism that investigates money, marketing and the anti-corporate movement.


As global corporations compete for the hearts and wallets of consumers who not only buy their products but willingly advertise them from head to toe a new generation has begun to battle consumerism with its own best weapons.


in this provocative study we learn how the Nike swoosh has changed from an athletic, status-symbol to a metaphor for sweatshop labour, how teenaged McDonald's workers are risking their jobs to join the Teamsters, and how culture jammers utilise spray paint, computer hacking acumen and anti-propagandist wordplay to undercut the slogans and meanings of billboard ads.

Mayhem

Sigrid Rausing

A Sunday Times Book of the Year

'Riveting, clear-sighted and exceptionally articulate... Her literary and psychoanalytic fluency gives the book an impact that feels arrestingly honest... Heartbreaking' Daily Telegraph

'An unsparing account of a family destroyed by drugs. Unique and haunting' Sunday Times

'What gives this book its astonishing power is not the guilt, but the intelligence and literary skill' Guardian

'I write, knowing that writing at all may be seen as a betrayal of family; a shaming, exploitative act. Anyone reading this who thinks so, please know that I thought it before you'

For years Sigrid Rausing watched helplessly as her brother Hans and his wife Eva succumbed to drug addiction. It afflicted a terrible toll on their family, culminating in Eva's tragic early death. As this death led to inquest and media circus, the world looked on in horror, but few understood the suffering endured by the Rausing family.

In Mayhem, Sigrid explores the collateral damage addiction wreaks on loved ones. Telling her family's story, she examines painful and rarely discussed questions. What is it like to live with addiction in the family? How can you help without hurting the one you love? And what does it mean to survive another's addiction?

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings

Maya Angelou (and others)

A BBC Radio 4 dramatisation of Maya Angelou's poignant, powerful autobiography, starring Adjoa Andoh and Indie Gjesdal

Abandoned by their parents, Maya and her older brother Bailey are sent to live with their grandmother and uncle in the small Southern town of Stamps in Arkansas. Struggling with rejection, they endure the prejudice of their white neighbours and suffer several racist incidents.

One day, their father unexpectedly returns and takes the children to live with their mother in St Louis, Missouri. Aged only eight, Maya is abused by her mother's boyfriend, an experience that haunts her for a lifetime. Filled with guilt and shame, she refuses to speak to anyone except Bailey – until she meets Mrs Bertha Flowers, who encourages her love of books, helping her to find her voice and regain her own strong spirit.

Maya Angelou’s debut memoir is a modern American classic, beloved worldwide, which recounts a youth filled with curiosity, wonder, disappointment, frustration, tragedy, and hard-won independence. This radio dramatisation, starring Adjoa Andoh and Indie Gjesdal, plays out her extraordinary story with dramatic verve and poetic brilliance.

Cast:
Narrator (Older Maya)...Adjoa Andoh
Maya...Indie Gjedsal
Bailey...Roshawn Hewitt
Momma...Cecilia Noble
Uncle Willie...Richard Pepple
Steward...John Lightbody
Girl...Francesca Elise

Dramatised by Patricia Cumper
Produced by Pauline Harris

Kaiser

Rob Smyth

1980s Rio de Janeiro.

There’s only one king in this city and he’s got the mullet, swagger and fake ID to prove it.

Introducing Carlos Henrique Raposo, known to all as KAISER.

This guy’s got more front than Copacabana beach. He’s the most loveable of rogues with the most common of dreams: to become a professional footballer. And he isn’t about to let trivial details like talent and achievement stand in his way. . . not when he has so many other ways to get what he wants.

In one of the most remarkable football stories ever told, Kaiser graduates from abandoned slumdog to star striker, dressing-room fixer, superstar party host and inexhaustible lover.

And all without kicking a ball.

He’s not just the king… he’s the Kaiser.

Signature Killers

Robert Keppel (and others)

‘This book will make you think… it will frighten you, and it will shock you… Frankly I could not read it at night.’ – Ann Rule

How do you catch a serial killer?

Interpreting the calling cards of the serial murderer, Robert Keppel reveals the answers hidden among the grisly evidence, the common threads that link each devastating act of brutal violence. Explore in unflinching detail the monstrous patterns, sadistic compulsions and depraved motives of the killer, and why they kill again and again.

Signature Killers is the ultimate insight into the mind of the serial killer.

From The Lonely Hearts Killer who haunted the most desperate of women in 1950s America, to the infamous symbols of evil as Jeffrey Dahmer, Ted Bundy and John Gacy, these are the cases– horrifying, graphic and unforgettable– that shed light on the darkest corners of the pathological mind.

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