New and forthcoming

Be More Pirate

Sam Conniff Allende

Have you ever wanted to make your mark on the world and wondered how?
Have you ever wanted to stand up to the system, break it, or make it better?
Have you ever wondered how to find success amidst unpredictability ?

The answer? Be More Pirate.

In Be More Pirate, award-winning social entrepreneur Sam Conniff Allende reveals how the game-changing innovations, strategies and purpose of pirates can provide a blueprint for anyone embarking on their own personal adventure.

From creating the world's most iconic brand 150 years before Coca-Cola to championing free trade and fair pay, pirates were the true pioneers of their day. Drawing on the original eighteenth century pirate code and looking to 'modern day pirates' like Banksy, Elon Musk and Malala for inspiration, Conniff Allende reveals how to stand up to the status quo and create a personal manifesto that will ensure you find success in uncertain times.

Whatever your ideas or the scale of your ambitions, Be More Pirate will revolutionise the way you think, work and live.

Sam Conniff Allende is the founder and former CEO of Livity, a multi-award-winning youth marketing agency. Conniff Allende has led the unlikeliest collaborations between brands and bright young people on the edges of society, resulting in real innovation. He has worked with Google, Unilever, PlayStation and Dyson, and regularly speaks at these industry-leading companies.

On the Edge

Richard Davies

To understand how humans react and adapt to change we need to study people who live in harsh environments. From the death-row prisoners trading in prisons where money is banned to the stateless ethnic Russians shut out of Estonia’s hyper-modern economy, every life in this book has been hit by a seismic shock, violently broken or damaged in some way.
People living in these odd and marginal places are ignored by number crunching economists and political pollsters alike. Science suggests this is a mistake.
This book tells the personal stories of humans living in extreme situations. 'Extreme' does not mean the familiar stock market crashes, housing crises, or banking scandals of the financial pages. The book takes the reader to really odd places, the places that no-one visits. Places where part of the economy has been repressed, removed, destroyed or turbocharged. By travelling to each of them and discovering what life is really like, On the Edge tells small stories that shed light on today’s biggest economic questions.

Crucible

Charles Emmerson

What comes first: the character of the times, or the characters who give it theirs?

Crucible charts the trajectories of the characters who fell from power in the bloody breakdown of Europe’s old order between 1917 and 1924, and those who for whom the restless chaos marked the beginning of an unlikely rise to fame.

Year by year, we follow Kaiser Wilhelm into his wood-chopping Dutch exile, and Lenin from his Swiss library-desk to his muddled end as an invalid in revolutionary Russia gone stale. Ernest Hemingway criss-crosses the Atlantic in search of himself: soldier, hack journalist, writer, fisherman. Surrealism is born in a Paris attic. Europe suffers a nervous collapse, alternating between revolution and reaction. America takes fright. A Viennese doctor of eclectic tastes becomes an intellectual celebrity. An Austrian ex-soldier touts himself as the tribune of the German people.

Outside the classic frames of war and peace, these all-too-human tales – funny, tragic and fateful – tell a wider story of the exuberant dreams, dark fears, grubby ambition and sheer chance which marked Europe’s post-war metamorphosis, and the century to come.

The Boy Who Followed His Father into Auschwitz

Jeremy Dronfield

The inspiring, true story of a father and son's fight to stay together and to survive the Holocaust.

In 1939, Gustav Kleinmann, a Jewish upholsterer in Vienna, was seized by the Nazis. Along with his teenage son Fritz, he was sent to Buchenwald in Germany. There began an unimaginable ordeal that saw the pair beaten, starved and forced to build the very concentration camp they were held in.

When Gustav was set to be transferred to Auschwitz, a certain death sentence, Fritz refused to leave his side. Throughout the horrors they witnessed and the suffering they endured, there was one constant that kept them alive: the love between father and son.

Based on Gustav's secret diary and meticulous archive research, this book tells his and Fritz's story for the first time - a story of courage and survival unparalleled in the history of the Holocaust.

Talking to My Daughter

Yanis Varoufakis

‘Why is there so much inequality?’ Xenia asks her father, the world famous economist Yanis Varoufakis.

Drawing on memories of her childhood and a variety of well-known tales – from Oedipus and Faust to Frankenstein and The Matrix – Varoufakis explains everything you need to know in order to understand why economics is the most important drama of our times. In answering his daughter’s deceptively simple questions, Varoufakis disentangles our troubling world with remarkable clarity, while inspiring us to make it a better one.

Dark Mirror

Barton Gellman

Barton Gellman’s informant called himself ‘Verax’ – the truth-teller. It was only later that Verax unmasked himself as Edward Snowden. By that point he had already shared thousands of files with Gellman.

Dark Mirror is the ultimate inside account of the vast, global surveillance network that now pervades all our lives. Gellman’s primary role in bringing Snowden’s revelations to light, for which he shared the Pulitzer prize, is only the beginning of this gripping real-life spy story. Snowden unlocked the door: here Gellman describes what he found on the other side over the course of a years-long journey of investigation. It is also the story of his own escalating battle against unknown digital adversaries after he discovered his own name on a file in the NSA document trove and realised that he himself was under attack.

Through a gripping narrative of paranoia, clandestine operations and jaw-dropping revelations, Dark Mirror delineates in full for the first time the hidden superstructure that connects government espionage with Silicon Valley and the most powerful corporation whose name you’ve never heard. Who is spying on us and why? Here are the answers.

Becoming

Michelle Obama

An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America - the first African-American to serve in that role - she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her - from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world's most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it - in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations - and whose story inspires us to do the same.

Britain's Best Political Cartoons 2018

Tim Benson

Between Britain’s beleaguered Brexit talks and chaos in Trump’s White House, the FIFA World Cup in Russia and and a long-awaited Royal Wedding, Britain’s political cartoonists’ pens are poised to skewer, celebrate and deride the biggest political events of 2018. In Britain’s Best Political Cartoons, Dr Tim Benson returns with another compendium of the wittiest drawings from our very best political cartoonists, including Steve Bell, Martin Rowson, ‘Mac’, Peter Brookes, and many more. Occasionally thought-provoking, often incisive and always hilarious, it is a riotous tour through another unforgettable twelve months in politics.

Jeeves and the King of Clubs

Ben Schott

Building on Wodehouse’s incalculable legacy, JEEVES AND THE KING OF CLUBS reimagines Bertie Wooster as a British spy, and the Junior Ganymede – the club for the gentleman’s gentleman - as a branch of the British Secret Service. Full of intrigue, exploits, comedy and wit, Schott and Wodehouse make for a harmonious, hilarious pair.

Miami and the Siege of Chicago

Norman Mailer

Miami, Summer 1968. The Vietnam War is raging; Martin Luther King, Jr., and Bobby Kennedy have just been assassinated. The Republican Party meets in Miami and picks Richard Nixon as its candidate, to little fanfare. But when the Democrats back Lyndon Johnson's ineffectual vice president, Hubert Humphrey, the city of Chicago erupts. Antiwar protesters fill the streets and the police run amok, beating and arresting demonstrators and delegates alike, all broadcast on live television, and captured in these pages by one of America's fiercest intellects.

The Armies of the Night

Norman Mailer

October 21, 1967, Washington, D.C. 20,000 to 200,000 protesters are marching to end the war in Vietnam, while helicopters hover overhead and federal marshals and soldiers with fixed bayonets await them on the Pentagon steps. Among the marchers is Norman Mailer. From his own singular participation in the day's events and his even more extraordinary perceptions comes a classic work that shatters the mould of traditional reportage. Intellectuals and hippies, clergymen and cops, poets and army MPs crowd the pages of a book in which facts are fused with techniques of fiction to create the nerve-end reality of experiential truth.

The Armies of the Night uniquely and unforgettably captures the Sixties' tidal wave of love and rage at its crest and a towering genius at his peak.

How To Be Right

James O'Brien

Caller: ‘It was a big thing voting Brexit. I was willing to take that sacrifice so we control our own laws.’
James O’Brien: ‘So I'm just wondering what those laws are that you won't have to obey any more, that made you vote for this economic hit. Can you name one?
Caller: ‘I wouldn't be able to, no.

James O’Brien has made a career of listening to people phoning in to his daily show on LBC to point the blame at benefits scroungers, the EU, Muslims, feminists and immigrants. But what makes James’s show such essential listening – and has made James a standout social media star – is the careful way he punctures their assumptions and dismantles their arguments live on air, every single morning.

In How to be Right, James provides a hilarious and invigorating guide to talking to people with faulty opinions. With chapters on every lightning-rod issue in current affairs, James tells the stories of the conversations he’s had, explains why people have been fooled into thinking the way they do, and in each case outlines the key questions to ask to reveal fallacies, inconsistencies and double standards.

If you ever encounter ardent Brexiteers, Daily Mail readers or little England patriots, this book is your conversation survival guide. Forget agreeing to disagree – it’s time to learn how to be right.

‘I have had a ringside seat as a significant swathe of the British population was sold an enormous dose of industrial strength snake oil. I watched them being persuaded that their failures were the fault of foreigners, that their lack of funds was caused by people with even less than them and that their whole lives were somehow somebody else’s fault. I listened to them explain how unisex lavatories threatened their peace of mind and heard them insist that ‘all Muslims’ must somehow apologise for terror attacks undertaken by extremists. I tried to dissuade them and sometimes succeeded… The challenge is to do it in a way that distinguishes sharply between the people who told lies and the people whose only offence was to believe them.’
– James O’Brien