New and forthcoming

Travels With Macy

Bruce Fogle

After a thirty-year career as a high profile vet, columnist, presenter and author Bruce Fogle - the UK's bestselling cat & dog writer - decided to leave urban Britain and take a journey with his dog Macy. Travelling in the footsteps of the great American novelist John Steinbeck, who published Travels with Charley - his standard poodle - in the '60s, Fogle set off in search of the North America of his childhood. Would he, after all this time, be able to work out whether home meant the UK or America? Would he find the welcoming, peaceful backwaters of his youth unchanged?

Together with Macy, Fogle retraced Steinbeck's steps through the length of North America, meeting people, cadging meals, and indulging in some of the world's best dog-walking territory. What Bruce found in a changing America surprised and delighted him. What Macy found (thousands of miles of unspoilt wilderness) made her very happy. And hungry. An entertaining and evocative journey in the company of a very, very happy dog.

The Cat Who Stayed For Christmas

Cleveland Amory

Once upon a time, on a cold and frosty Christmas Eve night, a bedraggled white cat called Polar Bear wandered into Cleveland Amory’s life and won his heart. This remarkable, much-loved cat went on to become the focus of Cleveland’s classic bestseller, The Cat Who Came for Christmas.

The Cat Who Stayed for Christmas continues the true story of Cleveland and Polar Bear as they embark upon exciting adventures whilst continuing to stubbornly guard their territory and engage in hilarious battles of will.

Full of unexpected delights, and written with warmth and humour, The Cat Who Stayed for Christmas recounts the many escapades of Polar Bear and the man he owns.

100 Years of Wildlife

Michael Bright

Ever since 1907, when a flickering film about birds enthralled a cinema audience, we've been fascinated by watching the natural world on film. For 100 years wildlife films have taken us to places and shown us things we would never be able to see - the excitement, the strangeness, the danger of the wild. Today, our interest in the wonders of the natural world is stronger than ever.

Accompanying the lavish BBC two-hour special, Top 100 Wildlife Moments dives into the archives to find the 100 wildlife moments that best celebrate the glories and the eccentricities of this astonishingly popular and enduring culture. Discover the history of the wildlife moving image: the first heady days when an ant juggling a matchbox was big box office; the charismatic and sometimes controversial celebrity presenters; the astonishing behaviour of animals and plants; the boggling oddities of nature; the animals now extinct that poignantly only exist on film.

Explore 100 years of revelation - from the black-and-white silent footage that started it all to the almost magical photography techniques seen today in programmes like Planet Earth. From famous faces of wildlife TV to extraordinary animal (and plant) behaviour, natural history filming has changed the way we look at and think about our world. It's all here - so weird, you couldn't make it up; so wonderful, you wouldn't want to miss it.

Life in the Undergrowth

David Attenborough Productions Ltd

David Attenborough reveals a secret universe it is teeming with life and is all around us, yet we never see it. It is the world of the very small, and it is a world of sex, drugs and violence. Here David shows us not just bugs, beetles and creepy-crawlies, but scorpions and centipedes, mites and mantids, spiders and dragonflies. And not just life in the undergrowth, but the dramatic battles between predator and prey that are happening in the corner of your living room and in your larder. See magnificent spectacles: swarming antler moths; millions of desert locusts; a mountain of locusts. For every pound of humans on Earth, there are 300 pounds of insects.

An Obsession With Butterflies

Sharman Apt Russell

From Hindu mythology to Aztec sacrifices, butterflies have served as a metaphor for resurrection and transformation. Even during World War II, children in a Polish death camp scratched hundreds of butterflies onto the wall of their barracks. But as Sharman Apt Russell points out in this rich and lyrical meditation, butterflies have above all been objects of obsession.

From the beastly horned caterpillar whose blood helps it count time, to the peacock butterfly with wings that hiss like a snake, Russell traces butterflies through their life cycles, exploring the creatures' own obsessions with eating, mating, and migrating. She reveals the logic behind our endless fascination with butterflies as well as the driving passion of such legendary collectors as the tragic Eleanor Glanville, whose children declared her mad because of her compulsive butterfly collecting, and the brilliant Henry Walter Bates, whose collections from the Amazon in 1858 helped develop his theory of mimicry in nature.

Russell also takes us inside some of the world's most prestigious natural history museums, where scientists painstakingly catalogue and categorize new species of Lepidoptera, hoping to shed light on insect genetics and evolutionAn Obsession with Butterflies is a luminous journey through an exotic world of strange beauty; a book to be treasured by anyone who's ever watched a butterfly mid-flight.

The Big New Yorker Book of Dogs

Foreword by Malcolm Gladwell

For dog lovers, from the greatest magazine in the world, an irresistible anthology of long-form essays, short humour pieces, poems, fiction, and cartoons.

Nobody but The New Yorker could assemble such an extraordinary compendium on the subject of man's best friend, and no other magazine could boast such an stellar list of contributors, which includes James Thurber, Malcolm Gladwell, John Updike, Ian Frazier, Susan Orlean on Rin Tin Tin, Arthur Miller, Roald Dahl, and E. B. White.

With a bold, beautifully designed package, this is the must-have book for dog lovers of every persuasion.

The Cat Who Came For Christmas

Cleveland Amory

Cleveland Amory first met the bedraggled Polar Bear in a New York alley one snowy Christmas Eve. From the moment Cleveland rescued the starving and injured cat a special bond began to form between the damaged animal and the bachelor journalist who preferred dogs. This is the story of their first year together, the story of a stray cat with a mind of his own, and the curmudgeonly man who grew to love him.

If you have ever owned a cat, or been owned by one, you will recognize the delight in the journey that followed this Christmas Eve encounter. From Polar Bear's fitness programme to their trip to Hollywood and the funny and touching conversations Cleveland and his stubborn little friend share, this is a heart-warming tale of feline and human nature that any animal lover can enjoy all year round.

Ganges

Jon Nicholson

The Ganges (Gang Ma or Great Mother) is the holiest river in the world. Rising from the pure glacial meltwaters of the Himalayas, it flows down onto India's northern plain and heads eastward into the swamplands of Bangladesh, finally discharging a vast, 500km (310-mile) tongue of silt into the Bay of Bengal.

As well as filling wells and irrigating crops to sustain the cities and villages along its banks, it is the spiritual life-blood of India's primary religion, Hinduism. Bathing in the Ganges remains the lifelong ambition of many of India's believing masses, who consider the river to be a living goddess. People gather daily at her banks to murmur prayers, baptise children, wash vibrantly coloured saris, drink her waters or simply die - believing such acts help absolve sins and lead the way to nirvana.

Ganges reveals the source of the river high in the Himalayas - the youngest mountain range in the world - and follows its route as it sharply incises the mountains on its journey southeast. Along the way, we discover the Hindu story of the river's creation and how it supports the myriad forms of life that thrive on its banks.

With stunning images by photographer Jon Nicholson and accompanying text by the producers of the BBC2 television series, Ganges is a true visual feast - as teeming with life and colour as the mighty river itself.

Galapagos

Paul D. Stewart

The Galapagos archipelago is made up of thirteen main islands and more than sixty other islets, rocks and reefs, scattered over four hundred kilometres of open ocean. Sitting at a confluence of four major ocean currents, the islands are actually the summits of vast undersea volcanoes, and are steadily on the march. How has such an odd assortment of life managed to find a footing in this unruly world? Micro-climates and altitude have combined to form discrete environmental zones: perfect habitats for the islands diverse fauna marine iguanas, petrels, blue-footed boobies and giant tortoises being but a famous few. Galapagos is a rare insight into an incredible landscape, a natural laboratory and an exquisite evolutionary habitat that Darwin described as a 'world within itself'. Both fragile and furious, the Galapagos is unlike any other place on earth.

The Philosopher Cat

Kwong Kuen Shan

Kwong Kuen Shan has gathered together forty beautiful paintings of the animal many people hold dear to their hearts and accompanied these with Chinese proverbs and sayings. These cats are instantly recognisable: the playful and adventurous cat; the languid cat; the philosopher cat. With the same style and lightness of touch that made The Cat and the Tao such a delight, this is a beautiful book that cat-lovers will treasure.

Island

Garth Waite (and others)

Island is a detailed and lovingly illustrated account of a newly married couple's first idyllic year on the tiny Scottish island of Easdale. It took them six years to complete, and it will delight anyone who responds to the romance of life on a remote island.

Animal London

Ianthe Ruthven

London is full of animals. They are hidden in crumbling graveyards, daubed in canal-bank graffiti, perched atop rooftops. But in the hustle-and-bustle at street-level they are all too often overlooked. This quirky guidebook, with its gorgeous photography, brings to life the animal artworks that give London its unique character.

From rabbits, owls, dogs and cats to tortoises, dolphins, sharks and gorillas, a menagerie of creatures inhabits every corner of the capital from Tobacco Docks to Crystal Palace, Bankside to Hackney.They span both ancient and modern too: monstrous medieval gargoyles lurk down damp alleyways, while in a modern urban wasteland there lives a 'mechanosaurous' made out of car parts by scrap merchants.

These animals fill London with life. From the moment you spy one in the undergrowth of a neglected park, or spot for the first time one clinging to the parapet of a classic landmark, you will embark on a remarkable topographical treasure-hunt.