New and forthcoming

Alive

Piers Paul Read

LOST
1972. A plane has crashed in the Andes mountains. The passengers are hopelessly lost in one of the most isolated places on earth.

ABANDONED
Almost three months later, two of the survivors, emaciated and frozen, reach the authorities and lead a rescue team to the remaining fourteen passengers.

ALIVE
The rescue team are shocked when they reach the crash-site. Food supplies have long gone, and the remains of the dead lie scattered among the fuselage.

It is only too clear how these passengers have managed to stay alive ...

Sculthorpe

Paul Sculthorpe

PAUL SCULTHORPE is the man who was born to be a superstar. Touted as a future Great Britain skipper before he even played his first game as a professional, he has more than lived up to the billing over the ensuing years.

The only player to ever be named Man of Steel in successive years, the St Helens captain is arguably the most talented man to grace a rugby league field in modern times. Yet Sculthorpe did not always have his sights set on Challenge Cup and Grand Final glory. As a youngster he spent his time booting a football around with brother Lee - and actually had to be forced into playing his first game of rugby.
From that moment a star was born, as he went on to captain every side he represented, even though he was often playing a year above his age group.

Warrington were the first to spot that potential, snapping him up on schoolboy terms, and helping shape the greatest player in Super League history. When he went hunting a bigger stage, St Helens had no hesitation paying a world record £370,000 - a transfer fee that quickly looked a bargain.
Since then various rugby union clubs have sounded out the chances of tempting him into a code switch, while the biggest names in Australia would love to take the prize Pom Down Under.
Throughout it all Scully has stayed true to his roots, even though that loyalty was sorely tested when knee injuries led to a whispering campaign that he was finished.

Now Sculthorpe lifts the lid on a remarkable career. The highs and the lows; the friendships and the fall-outs; and where he feels his future REALLY lies. It's a no-holds barred account of one man's incredible rise to the top - and the steely determination which keeps him there.

Sea Survival

THE ULTIMATE SURVIVAL GUIDE for anyone who thinks they'd survive the world's most hostile environments - or at least imagine they could do.

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First issued to airmen in the 1950s, the Air Ministry's Sea Survival guide includes original and authentic emergency advice to crew operating over the ocean.

With original illustrations and text, these survival guides provide an insight to military survival techniques from a by-gone era.

Packed with original line drawings and instruction in:

- How to punch man-eating sharks. Which are 'cowards'
- The pros and cons of drinking 'fish juice'
- When to smoke

Focussing on one of the most challenging environments on Earth, Sea Survival is one of four reprints of The Air Ministry's emergency survival pamphlets.

Others include:

Jungle Survival
Desert Survival
Arctic Survival

Johnners' A View From The Boundary Test Match Special

Barry Johnston (and others)

John Cleese, Christopher Lee and Michael Parkinson share their passion for cricket with the great broadcaster, Brian Johnston. During the lunch interval on the Saturday of every Test in England, BBC Radio’s ‘Test Match Special’ used to invite a well-known guest into the commentary box for a chat with Brian Johnston about themselves and their passion for cricket. Some turned out to be able cricketers, but they all had stories to tell about matches they had seen and cricketers they had met. Barry Johnston - Brian Johnston’s son - has selected five chats from the series ‘A View from the Boundary’, beginning in 1980 with the playwright Ben Travers, and his vivid recollections of W.G. Grace and other characters from the golden age of cricket. He is followed by Michael Charlton, the political broadcaster and former cricket commentator, who covered the great Australia v West Indies tied Test in 1960, and John Cleese, a lifelong Somerset supporter, who tells some funny stories about ‘Monty Python’ and ‘Fawlty Towers’. Hollywood film star Sir Christopher Lee recalls watching the legendary Jack Hobbs and Don Bradman, and Sir Michael Parkinson talks about opening the batting at Barnsley with Dickie Bird and how he nearly played for Hampshire. Publisher’s note: This recording was taken from part of the cassette release of ‘A View from the Boundary’.

1 CD. 1 hr 15 mins approx.

Johnners' Trivia Test Match

Brian Johnston (and others)

Brian Johnston, aka ‘Johnners’, the BBC’s long-time cricket commentator, is the umpire in this test of wit and general knowledge, as two teams try to score the highest number of runs under his watchful eye. In these four episodes, team captains Tim Rice and Willie Rushton are joined by Stephen Fry, Paul Merton, Tim Brooke-Taylor, Barry Cryer, Bill Tidy, Caroline Quentin, Bernard Cribbins and Robin Bailey. But which questions will they go for? The easier ‘single’ worth just one run? Or will they try the harder question and attempt a ‘boundary’ (four runs)? Can the batting team reach six questions (an ‘over’) before the other team gets a go? And there’s every chance that calls of ‘Howzat!’ or ‘Bouncer!’ can interrupt play... With questions that include trivia and unusual facts, hear the stumps fly and the wickets fall in these four wonderful episodes.

2 CDs. 1 hr 56 mins.

Cricketing Tales From The Dressing Room

BBC Audiobooks Ltd (and others)

BBC cricket correspondent Jonathan Agnew presents a new collection of anecdotes and reflections from some of the best-loved characters of international cricket. Some of the most colourful stars of the game, including Ian Botham, Mike Gatting, Graham Gooch, Jack Russell, Derek Underwood, Gladstone Small - and many more - recall the hilarious, embarrassing and most memorable moments of test match cricket. From the glory days when players fended off over-eager fans to the dressing room pranks and pedalo rides of more recent years, here are many humorous and classic cricketing moments from the 1960s through to the present day game. These great characters of the game tell their favourite stories and remember some of their most dramatic moments, linked and introduced by Jonathan 'Aggers' Agnew. This title features many new interviews specially recorded for this edition. '...goes down as nicely as one of the endless fruit cakes that listeners make for the Radio 4 commentators' - South Wales Argus.

2 CDs. 1 hr 45 mins.

John Arlott's Cricketing Wides, Byes And Slips!

John Arlott (and others)

The imagery and wit of an incomparable broadcaster is captured here in a unique collection of historic, and humorous, moments from the twentieth century. From the 1940s we hear about Bradman’s last test, from the 50s Compton’s highest Test Score, from the 60s Trueman’s 300th Test wicket and Boycott’s first ton, and then the 70s with Arlott’s ‘freaker’ (the Lord’s streaker) and finally John’s last commentary at the Lord’s centenary Test in 1980. His commentary was poetic in its elegance, and the pictures he painted with words are vintage: ‘the stroke of a man knocking a thistle top off with a walking stick’ (on Clive Lloyd in 1975) and ‘a colony of silver gulls... perched on the top of the stand as if they were vultures recruited for Lillee’ during the Centenary Test in Melbourne. Presented by Peter Baxter, here is a selection of classic clips from the very personification of cricket, brought together for the first time. ‘There’s never been a commentator like him, there never will be’ - Ian Botham.

1 CD. 1 hr 9 mins.

Johnners Cricketing Gaffes, Giggles And Cakes

Barry Johnston (and others)

Brian Johnston, known to everyone as Johnners, was as well known for his on-air gaffes as for his Test Match Special commentaries. Here are his most famous and funniest cricketing mishaps, which have been chosen by his son, Barry. Among Johnners’ laugh-out-loud clangers are ‘joined by the Balls’, ‘sitting on a shooting stick’ and a streaker’s ‘cheeky performance... waving her flag and other things’. There’s also Mr Titt’s letter... More giggles from the archives include Johnners’ notorious Ashes comedy song, his appearances on Quote, Unquote and Trivia Test Match, plus Fawlty Towers insights from John Cleese. From leg-pulling to leg-overs, inflatable parrots to chocolate cake, this special recording is not just for cricket lovers, it’s for anyone who loves a laugh!

1 CD. 1 hr 10 mins.

The Grudge

Tom English

Murrayfield, the Calcutta Cup, March 1990. England vs. Scotland - winner-takes-all for the Five Nations Grand Slam, the biggest prize in northern hemisphere rugby. Will Carling's England are the very embodiment of Margaret Thatcher's Britain - snarling, brutish and all-conquering. Scotland are the underdogs - second-class citizens from a land that's become the testing ground for the most unpopular tax in living memory: Thatcher's Poll Tax. In Edinburgh, nationalism is rising high - what happens in the stadium will resound far beyond the pitch.

The Grudge brilliantly recaptures a day that has gone down in history when a rugby match became more than a game. This is the real story of an extraordinary conflict, told with astounding insight and unprecedented access to key players, coaches and supporters on both sides (Will Carling, Ian McGeechan, Brian Moore and the rest). Tom English has produced a gripping account of a titanic struggle that thrusts the reader right into the heart of the action. Game on.

Roars from the Back of the Bus

Stewart McKinney (and others)

After the memorial service for legendary England number 8 Andy Ripley, where he saw so many friends from rugby, Stewart McKinney decided to compile a selection of stories from players who have been involved with the British and Irish Lions.

The result is Roars from the Back of the Bus, an absorbing, amusing and at times moving collection of tales that give a rare insight into the camaraderie that exists between players at the top of their game, showing that relationships forged through experiences on a Lions tour last a lifetime.

From the first Tour in 1888, it showcases characters with immense personality who fought together in wars or on rugby pitches in foreign lands, and who shared a bond developed through touring as representatives of the home nations. Exclusive access to letters from Alexander Findlater Todd in 1896 and diaries from 1938 and 1955 show how today’s Lions still follow links established years ago. Despite the changes to the game following the advent of professionalism, the experiences of Jamie Heaslip, Brian O’Driscoll and Joe Worsley can still be compared to those of earlier intrepid tourists like Blair Mayne, Lewis Jones, Sir Carl Aarvold or David Rollo. Containing defining memories and private insights from across the tours and the decades, it shows that the Lions ethos remains strong at the heart of every team.

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