New and forthcoming

Abandoned

From the empty magical theatres of Detroit to the lost playgrounds of Chernobyl, there are places across the globe that were once a hub of activity, but are now abandoned and in decay. With nature creeping in and reclaiming these spots, we are left with eerie crumbling ruins and breath-taking views of deserted places, that offer us a window into past and capture our imagination. Abandoned showcases the very best photographs from around the world documenting this phenomenon.

More immersive than a museum and more human that a lecture, abandoned photography has given the world an exciting way to look at our history and the places we have long neglected.

Compiled and curated by photographer and former urban explorer, Mathew Growcoot.

Long Road from Jarrow

Stuart Maconie

In the autumn of 1936, some 200 men from the Tyneside town of Jarrow marched 300 miles to London in protest against the destruction of their towns and industries. Precisely 80 years on, Stuart Maconie, walks from north to south retracing the route of the emblematic Jarrow Crusade. Following history’s footsteps, Maconie is in search of what Modern Britain is really like today.

Travelling down the country’s spine, Maconie moves through a land that is, in some ways, very much the same as the England of the thirties with its political turbulence, austerity, north/south divide, food banks and of course, football mania. Yet in other ways, it is completely unrecognisable; highstreets peppered with pound shops and e-cigarette vendors, smoothie bars and Costas on every corner.

Maconie visits the great, established and yet evolving cities of Leeds, Sheffield and London, as well as the sleepy hamlets, quiet lanes and roaring motorways. He meets those with stories to tell and whose voices build a funny, complex and entertaining tale of Britain, then and now. Written in Maconie’s signature style, this is a fascinating exploration of a modern nation that, though looks and sounds strangely familiar, has been completely transformed.

The Songlines: Moleskine Special Edition

Bruce Chatwin

A limited special edition of Bruce Chatwin's classic text, produced in association with Moleskine, to celebrate the 30th anniversary of publication.

The Songlines is Bruce Chatwin's magical account of his journey across the length and breadth of Australia, following the invisible and ancient pathways that are said to criss-cross the land. Chatwin recorded his travels in his favourite notebook, which he would usually buy in bulk in a particular stationery shop in Paris. But when the manufacturer went out of business, he was told “Le vrai moleskine n’est plus”.
A decade after its publication, on reading this anecdote in The Songlines, a small Milanese publisher was inspired to revive production of the legendary ‘moleskine’ notebook.

This special edition of The Songlines celebrates both the 30th anniversary of the publication of Chatwin's iconic work, and the 20th anniversary of a brand that has now become synonymous with culture, memory and travel.

This beautiful Moleskine-bound edition is sold together with a blank Moleskine notebook, in which readers and travellers can record their own thoughts and adventures.

Spritz

Talia Baiocchi (and others)

From London to Venice, New York to Milan, the spritz has become synonymous with sipping cocktails in the sunshine on long summer evenings. So it’s no surprise that this iconic Italian aperitif is experiencing a revival around the world.

But where did it all begin? Intrigued by the rise of the spritz, Talia Baiocchi and Leslie Pariseau set out on a road trip from the wine bars of Venice to the old gilded cafes of Turin to reveal how it evolved from a local ritual into Italy’s most popular cocktail. They discover that the spritz isn’t just its colourful history of prosecco, bitter liqueurs and aromatized wines, but an attitude, a custom and a way of life.

In Spritz, they share the classics sampled on their journey as well as recipes from the world’s most renowned bartenders. These are the very best spritzes and a window into crowded piazzas and Italian cocktail culture. With traditional, modern and experimental alternatives, a guide to building a spritz bar, and a collection of food recipes for traditional Italian snacks, happy hour starts here.

Other Russias

Victoria Lomasko (and others)

From a renowned graphic artist and activist, an incredible portrait of life in Russia today

'Victoria Lomasko's gritty, street-level view of the great Russian people masterfully intertwines quiet desperation with open defiance. Her drawings have an on-the-spot immediacy that I envy. She is one of the brave ones' - Joe Sacco, author of Palestine

What does it mean to live in Russia today? What is it like to grow up in a forgotten city, to be a migrant worker or to grow old and seek solace in the Orthodox church?

For the past eight years, graphic artist and activist Victoria Lomasko has been travelling around Russia and talking to people as she draws their stories. She spent time in dying villages where schoolteachers outnumber students; she stayed with sex workers in the city of Nizhny Novgorod; she went to juvenile prisons and spoke to kids who have no contact with the outside world; and she attended every major political rally in Moscow.

The result is an extraordinary portrait of Russia in the Putin years -- a country full of people who have been left behind, many of whom are determined to fight for their rights and for progress against impossible odds. Empathetic, honest, funny, and often devastating, Lomasko's portraits show us a side of Russia that is hardly ever seen.

One Man and a Mule

Hugh Thomson

In the Middle Ages, mules were used to transport goods across Britain. Strong, sturdy and able to carry a good 160 lbs of weight, they made ideal walking companions (as long as you didn’t ask them to do anything they disapproved of).

Now Hugh Thomson has revived that ancient tradition.

Taking his cue from Robert Louis Stevenson's 19th-century bestseller Travels With a Donkey, Hugh leads his trusty mule Jethro across England from the Lake District to the Yorkshire Moors, using old drovers’ roads that have largely passed into disrepair.

His previous journeys have resulted in acclaimed books on Peru, Mexico and the Indian Himalaya, and more recently on southern England for the prize-winning The Green Road into the Trees.

As he crosses the north, he combines his trademark wit and insight with a lyrical intensity about the history and the landscape; and it is his encounters with the people he meets along the way which bring that landscape to life in a manner few other contemporary travel writers attempt.

“Everywhere Thomson goes, he finds good stories to tell.”
New York Times Book Review

The Art of Flight

Fredrik Sjöberg

'Although there is much in this world that is incomprehensible, you can nevertheless discover a meaning as long as you have managed to limit your field of search.'

Fredrik Sjöberg - collector, romantic, explorer - spends his life tracing the smallest details of the natural world. In these two beautifully wrought tales he meditates on the joy of little things, childhood memories, long-forgotten Swedish entomologists, earthworms, wine-making, the National Parks of the United States, the richness of life and the strange paths it leads us on.

'Digressive, discursive and delightful' Daily Telegraph

'A joy . . . Fredrik Sjöberg's best-selling memoir The Fly Trap marked him as a maestro of the episodic. Here, he completes a trilogy' Nature

'Thoroughly entertaining, beguilingly uncategorizable ... By his own admission Sjöberg has a "butterfly mind" ... What insures this approach against triviality is the author's patient alertness to pattern, to telling correspondence' Nat Segnit, The Times Literary Supplement

A Sky Full of Birds

Matt Merritt



'Prose from a poet and a personal take on the spectacles' Chris Packham, author of Fingers in the Sparkle Jar

Britain is a nation of bird-lovers. However, few of us fully appreciate the sheer scale, variety and drama of our avian life. From city-centre hunters to vast flocks straight out of the Arctic wilderness, much-loved dawn songsters to the exotic invaders of supermarket car parks, a host of remarkable wildlife spectacles are waiting to be discovered right outside our front doors.

In A Sky Full of Birds, poet and nature writer Matt Merritt shares his passion for birdwatching by taking us to some of the great avian gatherings that occur around the British isles – from ravens in Anglesey and raptors on the Wirral, to Kent nightingales and Scottish capercallies. By turns lyrical, informative and entertaining, he shows how natural miracles can be found all around us, if only we know where to look for them.