New and forthcoming

The Prime Minister of Paradise

John Jeremiah Sullivan

As a student working in the dusty archives of the Sewanee Review, John Jeremiah Sullivan came across an article entitled ‘Lost Utopia of the American Frontier’ and was immediately hooked on the dramatic story of a lost book, an alternative history of the South, a white Indian. It was a story he’d chase for the next two decades.

In 1735, a charismatic German lawyer and accused atheist named Christian Gottlieb Priber fled Germany under threat of arrest, bound for colonial South Carolina. In the Cherokee village of Grand Tellico, he created a Utopian society that he named Paradise.

For six years, Paradise was governed by a set of revolutionary ideas that included racial equality, sexual freedom, and a lack of private property, ideas which he chronicled in a mysterious manuscript he called Paradise.

Priber’s ideas were so subversive that he was hunted for half a decade and eventually captured by the British – making headlines across the world – and imprisoned until his death. The only copy of Paradise was apparently destroyed.

Now, in a rare combination of ground-breaking research and stunning narrative skill, award-winning writer John Jeremiah Sullivan brings that lost history vividly to life.

Hidden Victorian London

Christopher Winn

We may think we know Victorian London – the Houses of Parliament, Tower Bridge, and Royal Albert Hall may all spring to mind – but what about the exact footprint of the Crystal Palace, the first sheltered housing for the poor, the first schools, the glorious church regarded as the first and foremost example of High Victorian Gothic architecture in Britain or the Byzantine pumping station known as the Cathedral of Sewage? Hidden Victorian London takes us on a journey, seeking out the hidden gems of the Victorian city and revealing the compelling stories behind them.

The incidents and events of the Victorian era shaped a city that expanded and changed more rapidly than it had ever done before, or since. Victorian Londoners grappled with challenges from industrialisation, overcrowding and disease, to the coming of the railway, dramatic social change and religious uncertainty. Hidden Victorian London investigates these people and their achievements, affording us the opportunity to appreciate and reflect on the difficulties they overcame, and how they may inspire us to overcome the pressures we face today.

Included are chapters on Kensington (birthplace of Queen Victoria), the Victorian West End, Victorian Westminster and many more, illustrated with beautiful line drawings and maps to guide you. All of the walks can be done in a morning or afternoon, and make a final stop to a recommended Victorian pub.

Ground Work

Tim Dee

We are living in the anthropocene – an epoch where everything is being determined by the activities of just one soft-skinned, warm-blooded, short-lived, pedestrian species. How best to live in the ruins that we have made?

This anthology of commissioned work tries to answer this as it explores new and enduring cultural landscapes, in a celebration of local distinctiveness that includes new work from some of our finest writers. We have memories of childhood homes from Adam Thorpe, Marina Warner and Sean O’Brien; we journey with John Burnside to the Arizona desert with Tim Ingold to the Canadian Arctic; going from Tessa Hadley’s hymn to her London garden to caving in the Mendips with Sean Borodale to shell-collecting on a Suffolk beach with Julia Blackburn.

Helen Macdonald, in her remarkable piece on growing up in a 50-acre walled estate, reflects on our failed stewardship of the planet: ‘I take stock.’ she says, ‘During this sixth extinction, we who may not have time to do anything else must write now what we can, to take stock.’ This is an important, necessary book.

Seville Everyman Mapguide

6 fold-out maps + 2 fold-out spreads (Welcome and Transports & Hotels).
A choice of 60 sites not to be missed, organised by district.
Details of more than 100 restaurants, cafés, theatres, music venues,
shops, markets etc.
All the practical advice needed.
A list of the best places to stay, from budget hotel to luxury palace.

A Royal Collection

Michael Hall (and others)

The Royal Collection is the last great collection formed by the European monarchies to have survived into the twenty-first century. Containing over a million artworks and objects, it covers all aspects of the fine and decorative arts, from paintings by Rembrandt and Michelangelo to grand sculpture, Fabergé eggs and some of the most exquisite furniture ever made. The Royal Collection also offers a revealing insight into the history of the British monarchy from William the Conqueror to Queen Elizabeth II, recording the tastes and obsessions of kings and queens over the past 500 years.

With unprecedented access to the royal residences of St James' Palace, Windsor Castle and Buckingham Palace, A Royal Collection traces the history of this national institution from the Middle Ages to the present day, exploring how royalty used the arts to strengthen their position as rulers by divine right and celebrating treasures from the Crown Jewels to the "Abraham" tapestries in Hampton Court Palace. Author Michael Hall examines the monarchy's response to changing attitudes to the arts and sciences during the Enlightenment and celebrates the British monarchy's role in the democratisation of art in the modern world. Packed with glimpses of rarely seen artworks, A Royal Collection is a visual treat for all art enthusiasts.

Accompanying the upcoming BBC television series and a major exhibition at the Royal Academy, A Royal Collection is the definitive statement on the British monarchy's treasures of the art world.

Icebreaker

Horatio Clare

'We are celebrating a hundred years since independence this year: how would you like to travel on a government icebreaker?'

A message from the Finnish embassy launches Horatio Clare on a voyage around an extraordinary country and an unearthly place, the frozen Bay of Bothnia, just short of the Arctic circle. Travelling with the crew of Icebreaker Otso, Horatio, whose last adventure saw him embedded on Maersk container vessels for the bestseller Down to the Sea in Ships, discovers stories of Finland, of her mariners and of ice.

Finland is an enigmatic place, famous for its educational miracle, healthcare and gender equality – as well as Nokia, Angry Birds, saunas, questionable cuisine and deep taciturnity. Aboard Otso Horatio gets to know the men who make up her crew, and explores Finland’s history and character. Surrounded by the extraordinary colours and conditions of a frozen sea, he also comes to understand something of the complexity and fragile beauty of ice, a near-miraculous substance which cools the planet, gives the stars their twinkle and which may hold all our futures in its crystals.

Winter

Karl Ove Knausgaard (and others)

It is strange that you exist, but you don’t know anything about what the world looks like. It’s strange that there is a first time to see the sky, a first time to see the sun, a first time to feel the air against one’s skin. It’s strange that there is a first time to see a face, a tree, a lamp, pyjamas, a shoe. In my life that almost never happens anymore. But soon it will. In just a few months, I will see you for the first time.

The birth of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s youngest daughter draws near. Prompted to see the world anew, he writes short pieces on everything from winter boots to the brain, describing to her the wonders of life.

Winter is the second volume of the Seasons quartet, following on in time from Autumn and illustrated with exquisite watercolours by Swedish artist Lars Lerin.

The Meaning of Rice

Michael Booth

'The next Bill Bryson.’ New York Times

In this often hilarious yet deeply researched book, food and travel writer Michael Booth and his family embark on an epic journey the length of Japan to explore its dazzling food culture. They find a country much altered since their previous visit ten years earlier (which resulted in the award-winning international bestseller Sushi and Beyond).

Over the last decade the country’s restaurants have won a record number of Michelin stars and its cuisine was awarded United Nations heritage status. The world’s top chefs now flock to learn more about the extraordinary dedication of Japan’s food artisans, while the country’s fast foods – ramen, sushi and yakitori – have conquered the world. As well as the plaudits, Japan is also facing enormous challenges. Ironically, as Booth discovers, the future of Japan’s culinary heritage is under threat.

Often venturing far off the beaten track, the author and his family discover intriguing future food trends and meet a fascinating cast of food heroes, from a couple lavishing love on rotten fish, to a chef who literally sacrificed a limb in pursuit of the ultimate bowl of ramen, and a farmer who has dedicated his life to growing the finest rice in the world… in the shadow of Fukushima. They dine in the greatest restaurant in the world, meet the world champion of cakes, and encounter wild bears. Booth is invited to judge the world sushi championship, ‘enjoys’ the most popular Japanese dish you have never heard of aboard a naval destroyer, and unearths the unlikely story of the Englishwoman who helped save the seaweed industry.

Sushi and Beyond was also a bestseller in Japanese where its success has had improbable consequences for Booth and his family. They now star in their own popular cartoon series produced by national broadcaster NHK.

A Taste of Adventure

Exodus Travels Limited

If you're an adventurer with an appetite, then this cookbook is for you! This lovely cookbook is a collection of globetrotting gastronomy to help you recreate your travels at home.

The recipes in this book are from all over the world, from Vietnamese Pho and Indian Mango Lassi, to traditional African flatbreads, Middle Eastern Lamb Tagine, and Spanish Paella.

With these recipes you'll have the whole world at your fingertips!

Britain's 100 Best Railway Stations

Simon Jenkins

The railway station is a place of coming and going, meeting, greeting and parting. It is the setting for our hopeful beginnings and our intended ends, with its own furnishings, rituals and priests. Britain's stations are also an architecture that is little studied and much neglected. They were the 'below stairs' of the railway, carrying a legacy of soot, decay and industrial decline. Yet they are fascinating buildings, and ones that are returning to prominence with the revival of railway travel.

Simon Jenkins has travelled the length and breadth of Great Britain, from Waterloo to Wemyss Bay, Betws-y-Coed to Beverley, to select his hundred best. Blending his usual insight and authority with his personal reflections and experiences - including his founding the Railway Heritage Trust - the foremost expert on our national heritage deftly reveals the history, geography, design and significance of each of these glories.

Beautifully illustrated with colour photographs throughout, this voyage of discovery through our social history shows the station's role in the national imagination; champions the engineers, architects and rival companies that made them possible; and tells the story behind the triumphs and follies of these very British creations.

These are the marvellous, often unsung places that link our nation, celebrated like never before.

The Atlas of Beauty

Mihaela Noroc

Photographs and stories of 500 women from around the world, based on the author's hugely popular website.

Since 2013 Mihaela Noroc has travelled the world with her backpack and camera taking photos of everyday women to showcase the diversity and beauty all around us. The Atlas of Beauty is a collection of her photographs that celebrates women from fifty countries across the globe and shows that beauty is everywhere, regardless of money, race or social status, and comes in many different sizes and colours. Mihaela's portraits feature women in their native environments, from the Amazon rain forest to markets in India, London city streets and parks in Harlem, creating a mirror of our varied cultures and proving that beauty has no rules.

'Stunning . . . aims to challenge the ideals of beauty dictated by the women's fashion magazine industry' Independent

'A startling and revealing project' Daily Mail

'Scrolling through "The Atlas of Beauty", beauty becomes not a universal standard, but a complicated tapestry' Huffington Post

The Good Pub Guide 2018

Fiona Stapley

*With 10% more content than other beer and pub guides, and over 100 new entries this year*

The 36th edition of this much-loved guide is as invaluable as ever. Organized county by county, its comprehensive yearly updates and countless reader recommendations ensure that only the very best pubs make the grade.

Here you will not only find classic country pubs, town centre inns, riverside retreats and historic havens, but also popular newcomers including gastro pubs and pubs specialising in malt whisky and craft beer.

Discover the top pubs in each country for beer, food and accommodation, and find out the winners of the coveted titles of Pub of the Year and Landlord of the Year. Packed with hidden gems, The Good Pub Guide provides a wealth of honest, entertaining, up-to-date and indispensable information.

Autumn

Karl Ove Knausgaard (and others)

I want to show you our world as it is now: the door, the floor, the water tap and the sink, the garden chair close to the wall beneath the kitchen window, the sun, the water, the trees. You will come to see it in your own way, you will experience things for yourself and live a life of your own, so of course it is primarily for my own sake that I am doing this: showing you the world, little one, makes my life worth living.

Autumn begins with a letter Karl Ove Knausgaard writes to his unborn daughter. He adds one short piece per day, describing the material and natural world with the precision and mesmerising intensity that have become his trademark. This tender and deeply personal book is beautifully illustrated by Vanessa Baird, and is the first of four volumes marvelling at the vast, unknowable universe around us.

The Vacation Guide to the Solar System

Olivia Koski (and others)

Imagine taking a hike along the windswept red plains of Mars to dig for signs of life, or touring one of Jupiter’s sixty-four moons where you can take photos of its swirling storms. For a mini-break on a tight budget, the Moon is quite majestic and very quiet if you can make it during the off-season.

Beautifully illustrated and packed with real-world science, The Vacation Guide to the Solar System is the essential planning guide for the curious space adventurer, covering all of the essentials for your next voyage, how to get there, and what to do when you arrive. Written by an astronomer from the American Museum of Natural History and one of the creators of the Guerilla Science collective, this tongue-in-cheek reference guide is an imaginative exploration into the ‘what if’ of space travel, sharing fascinating facts about the planets in our solar system and even some moons!

Abandoned

The places time forgot

From the magical empty theatres of Detroit to the lost playgrounds of Chernobyl, there are places across the globe that were once a hub of activity, but are now abandoned and in decay. With nature creeping in and reclaiming these spots, we are left with eerie crumbling ruins and breathtaking views that offer us a window into the past and capture our imagination. Abandoned showcases the very best photographs from around the world documenting this phenomenon.

More immersive than a museum and more human that a lecture, abandoned photography has given the world an exciting way to look at our history and the places we have long neglected.

Compiled and curated by photographer and former urban explorer, Mathew Growcoot.

Flaneuse

Lauren Elkin

Selected as a Book of the Year 2016 by the Financial Times, Guardian, New Statesman, Observer, The Millions and Emerald Street

'Flâneuse [flanne-euhze], noun, from the French. Feminine form of flâneur [flanne-euhr], an idler, a dawdling observer, usually found in cities.

That is an imaginary definition.'

If the word flâneur conjures up visions of Baudelaire, boulevards and bohemia – then what exactly is a flâneuse?

In this gloriously provocative and celebratory book, Lauren Elkin defines her as ‘a determined resourceful woman keenly attuned to the creative potential of the city, and the liberating possibilities of a good walk’. Part cultural meander, part memoir, Flâneuse traces the relationship between the city and creativity through a journey that begins in New York and moves us to Paris, via Venice, Tokyo and London, exploring along the way the paths taken by the flâneuses who have lived and walked in those cities.

From nineteenth-century novelist George Sand to artist Sophie Calle, from war correspondent Martha Gellhorn to film-maker Agnes Varda, Flâneuse considers what is at stake when a certain kind of light-footed woman encounters the city and changes her life, one step at a time.

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