New and forthcoming

Good Guide to Dog Friendly Pubs, Hotels and B&Bs: 6th Edition

Catherine Phillips

What happens when you want to take a holiday, or even just pop out for a drink, and your dog looks up at you with those expectant eyes? Do you know which pubs welcome muddy paws with a bowl of water and a dog biscuit? Or where you and your dog can both enjoy a comfortable overnight stay?

From the editors of the UK's No 1 travel guide, the much loved Good Pub Guide, comes the latest edition of the Good Guide to Dog Friendly Pubs, Hotels and B&Bs. Featuring fully updated information, the guide provides you with hundreds of wonderful places in the UK to drink, eat and stay with your pet.

With this book to hand, there's no need to leave your dog at home. Faithful friends deserve a break too!

Pathlands

Peter Owen Jones

'When we walk, we walk through two landscapes: an exterior land of trees, seas, cities, mountains and fields but we also follow the paths that lead into our own interior world.'

This thoughtful, and beautifully written, book offers 21 circular walks. They span the length and breadth of the British Isles: Suffolk, Northamptonshire, Wiltshire, Wales, Staffordshire, Scotland, Sussex and Cornwall are just a few of the varied landscapes that they cover.

As one of the prime 'walks correspondents' of The Sunday Times, Peter Owen Jones already has a loyal following. This book will only increase his audience, and will be both for those who love walking in the countryside and those who enjoy reading, and musing on it, in their armchair at home.

Africa Solo

Mark Beaumont

SHORTLISTED FOR ADVENTURE TRAVEL BOOK OF THE YEAR

In the spring of 2015, Mark Beaumont set out from the bustling heart of Cairo on his latest world record attempt - solo, the length of Africa, intending to ride to Cape Town in under 50 days. Seven years since he smashed the world record for cycling round the world, this would be his toughest trip yet. And he would set a new mark that would simply break the limits of endurance.

Despite illness, mechanical faults, attempted robbery and stone-throwing children, as well as dehydration in the deserts and unprecedented levels of exhaustion, Mark completed the journey in just 41 days, 10 hours and 22 minutes, after cycling 6,762 miles, spending 439 hours in the saddle (sometimes up to 16 hours a day) and climbing 190,355 feet through 8 countries. It was an astonishing journey, and one that will fascinate and grip the reader.

From the obvious dangers of Egypt, Sudan and Kenya, over the unpaved, muddy, mountainous roads of Ethiopia, through the beautiful grasslands of Tanzania and Zambia, to riding at night in Botswana in the company of elephants and giraffes, Mark brings Africa to life in all its complex glory, friendship and curiosity, while inspiring us all to question the bounds of what is possible.

Deaths of the Poets

Michael Symmons Roberts (and others)

From Chatterton’s Pre-Raphaelite demise to Keats’ death warrant in a smudge of arterial blood; from Dylan Thomas’s eighteen straight whiskies to Sylvia Plath’s desperate suicide in the gas oven of her Primrose Hill kitchen or John Berryman’s leap from a bridge onto the frozen Mississippi, the deaths of poets have often cast a backward shadow on their work.

The post-Romantic myth of the dissolute drunken poet – exemplified by Thomas and made iconic by his death in New York – has fatally skewed the image of poets in our culture. Novelists can be stable, savvy, politically adept and in control, but poets should be melancholic, doomed and self-destructive. Is this just a myth, or is there some essential truth behind it: that great poems only come when a poet's life is pushed right to an emotional knife-edge of acceptability, safety, security? What is the price of poetry?

In this book, two contemporary poets undertake a series of journeys – across Britain, America and Europe – to the death places of poets of the past, in part as pilgrims, honouring inspirational writers, but also as investigators, interrogating the myth. The result is a book that is, in turn, enlightening and provocative, eye-wateringly funny and powerfully moving.

Catching Fireflies

Tony Rocca

Following an extended bout of hard city life, Tony Rocca and his wife, Mira, decided that some of the really important things were missing - good food, plenty of sunshine and a relaxed approach to life. Despite Tony's name, however, their decision to move to Chianti was not based on heritage, nor any knowledge of the Italian language or spirit that had failed to pass down the line to him.
Hardly expecting things to be straightforward, Tony and Mira set about raising a loan to purchase Collelungo, the dilapidated property they had set their hearts on converting into an 'agriturismo' hotel. Complications and misinterpretations followed hot on the heels of each other, and before long they found themselves in trouble with the Monte dei Paschi bank with a debt of one billion Lire.
Finding drumming-up business to be a tougher task than they had anticipated, it was not long before the Roccas realised that alternative avenues would have to be explored to increase their income. Keeping on the hospitality business, Tony was persuaded by Mira to experiment with the vines that had been part of the property purchase. Sceptical though he was about the investment involved, the success of these wines was unprecedented.
What follows is a heart-warming story of success and integration into a community through persistence, good humour, and sheer hard work.

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