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Ladybird

For younger readers

Biography

Terry Pratchett was the acclaimed creator of the global bestselling Discworld series, the first of which,The Colour of Magic, was published in 1983. In all, he was the author of over fifty bestselling books. His novels have been widely adapted for stage and screen, and he was the winner of multiple prizes, including the Carnegie Medal, as well as being awarded a knighthood for services to literature. He died in March 2015.

Books

Johnny and the Dead

Terry Pratchett (and others)

From the legendary Terry Pratchett, the author of Discworld, the second instalment in the Johnny Maxwell Triliogy

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Sell the cemetery?

Over their dead bodies . . .

Not many people can see the dead (not many would want to). Twelve-year-old Johnny Maxwell can. And he's got bad news for them: the council want to sell the cemetery as a building site. But the dead have learnt a thing or two from Johnny. They're not going to take it lying down . . . especially since it's Halloween tomorrow.

Besides, they're beginning to find that life is a lot more fun than it was when they were . . . well . . . alive. Particularly if they break a few rules . . .

The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents

Terry Pratchett (and others)

Even wizards produce leftovers.

But a wizard’s rubbish is laced with magic, and for the rats that forage this rubbish, the magic has changed them – they can speak and read, and have rather grand ambitions for a comfortable retirement.

Which is perfect for a con-cat like Maurice. He has his own magical talents, and wants to get rich quick. Together with the rats, and young (rather simple) Keith, the ‘piper’, they work the towns to create their very own plague of rats - then lure them away for cash.

But in the run-down town Bad Blintz, this little con goes wrong, and suddenly these educated rodents aren’t playing to the piper’s tune . . .

Only You Can Save Mankind

Terry Pratchett (and others)

Johnny Maxwell is just an ordinary boy – not smart, popular or rich.

But he does love video games.

And as his parents argue themselves out of a marriage, Johnny plays at becoming humanity’s’ last hope, shooting invading aliens out of a pixelated sky. Then comes a message from the last remaining alien spaceship: We Wish to Talk.

And suddenly Johnny is thrust into the very real world of the video game, and comes face to face with an alien race that needs his help.

Only Johnny can save them. And this isn't a game any more . . .


The first book in the Johnny Maxwell trilogy.

Father Christmas’s Fake Beard

Terry Pratchett (and others)

Have you ever wanted Christmas to be different?

Turkey and carols, presents and crackers - they all start to feel a bit . . . samey.

How about a huge exploding mince pie, a pet abominable snowman, or a very helpful partridge in a pear tree? What if Father Christmas went to work at a zoo, or caused chaos in a toy store or, was even, arrested for burglary!?

Dive into the fantastically funny world of Terry Pratchett, for a festive treat like no other. These ten stories will have you laughing, gasping and crying (with laughter) - you'll never see Christmas in the same way again.

'Funny, action-packed . . . a rip-roaring read' The Sun

The Witch's Vacuum Cleaner

Terry Pratchett

Do you believe in magic?

Can you imagine a war between wizards, a rebellious ant called 4179003, or a time-travelling television?

Can you imagine that poor old Mr Swimble could see a mysterious vacuum cleaner in the morning, and make cheese sandwiches and yellow elephants magically appear by the afternoon?

Welcome to the wonderful world of Sir Terry Pratchett, and fourteen fantastically funny tales from the master storyteller. Bursting from these pages are food fights, pirates, bouncing rabbits and magical pigeons.

And a witch riding a vacuum cleaner, of course.


‘One of the most consistently funny writers around’
Guardian

Wintersmith

Terry Pratchett (and others)

Witches are odd.

That much is clear to Tiffany. But she likes them . . . in an odd sort of way. Just as she likes Roland . . . in a friend sort of way (which most certainly isn’t odd).

But Tiffany hasn’t really got time to think about Roland, because she has accidentally danced with Winter himself – the Wintersmith.

And now the Wintersmith has a bit of a crush on Tiffany.

According to her friend Daft Wullie, if Tiffany kisses the Wintersmith (an awful thought), her nose turns blue and fall off. According to the witches, if she doesn’t shake off her admirer, there will never be another springtime . . .

‘Characteristically entertaining’
Sunday Times

I Shall Wear Midnight

Terry Pratchett (and others)

Tiffany Aching is a witch alone.

Well, that’s how she feels. Everyone seems so, apart. People respect her, but also fear her. There are loads of secrets she can’t share.

And when the Baron dies, and Tiffany is framed for his murder, it’s clearer than ever that she is, well . . . not liked

Now Tiffany must journey to Ankh-Morpork, to inform the Baron’s heir, Roland, of his father’s death. But on the way she meets something that likes witches very much . . . a bit too much – an evil ball of spite and malice that has only now woken up.

And is out to get witches everywhere . . .


‘High peaks of imagination’
Sunday Times

A Hat Full of Sky

Terry Pratchett (and others)

Tiffany Aching is going ‘into service’: to be a lady, no less, a maid in a big house. At least, this is what she tells her parents.

Really, Tiffany is going away to learn magic.

But making friends with fellow witches is always difficult when an invisible-being-that-cannot-be-killed takes over your body – stealing money, and threatening violence.

Tiffany must use all her witchy cunning to reclaim what’s hers. Luckily, she has a bit of help. What’s tiny, Scottish and blue all over? A Nac Mac Feegle of course – the rudest type of fairy, and handy to have in a tight spot . . .

‘Oodles of dry wit, imagination and shrewdly observed characters’
Independent on Sunday