Search: The Long Weekend

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The Long Weekend

Savita Kalhan (Author)

Sam knows that he and his friend Lloyd made a colossal mistake when they accepted the ride home. They have ended up in a dark mansion in the middle of nowhere with man who means to harm them. But Sam doesn't know how to get them out. They were trapped, then separated. Now they are alone. Will either of them get out alive?

This gripping and hypnotic thriller will have you reading late into the night...

The Long Weekend

Adrian Tinniswood (Author)

‘[A] fantastically readable and endlessly fascinating bookDelicious, occasionally fantastical, revealing in ways that Downtown Abbey never was.’ Rachel Cooke, Observer

A Daily Telegraph Book of the Year

There is nothing quite as beautiful as an English country house in summer. And there has never been a summer quite like that Indian summer between the two world wars, a period of gentle decline in which the sun set slowly on the British Empire and the shadows lengthened on the lawns of a thousand stately homes.

Real life in the country house during the 1920s and 1930s was not always so sunny. By turns opulent and ordinary, noble and vicious, its shadows were darker. In The Long Weekend, Adrian Tinniswood uncovers the truth about a world half-forgotten, draped in myth and hidden behind stiff upper lips and film-star smiles. Drawing on hundreds of memoirs, on unpublished letters and diaries, on the eye-witness testimonies of belted earls and unhappy heiresses and bullying butlers, The Long Weekend gives a voice to the people who inhabited this world. In a definitive social history which combines anecdote and narrative with scholarship, it brings the stately homes of England to life, giving readers an insight into the guilt and the gingerbread, and showing how the image of the country house was carefully protected by its occupants above and below stairs, and how the reality was so much more interesting than the dream.

Sisters of Fortune

Jehanne Wake (Author)

The Caton sisters were Southern belles descended from the first settlers in Maryland, and were expected to 'marry a Plantation'. But they were independent, fascinated by politics, clever with money, romantic in mood. Arriving In London in 1816 the three sisters forged their own destinies in the face of intense prejudice, against both Americans and Catholics. The widowed Marianne shocked the world by marrying the Wellington's wayward elder brother, the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, and appearing as a 'Catholic Yankee' among the Protestant Anglo-Irish. Louisa eventually became Duchess of Leeds, and a friend of Queen Victoria, while the sphere in which Bess shone was the stockmarket, as queen of speculators.

Based on intimate unpublished letters, Sisters of Fortune is a brilliant portrait of love between sisters, a most unusual story of money and power and a fascinating glimpse of how these extraordinary women influenced the social and international relations of their time.

Diana Mosley

Anne De Courcy (Author)

Diana Mosley was one of the most fascinating and controversial figures of recent times. For some, she was a cult; for many, anathema. Born in 1910 Diana was the most beautiful and the cleverest of the six Mitford sisters. She was eighteen when she married Bryan Guinness, of the brewing dynasty, by whom she had two sons. After four years, she left him for the fascist leader, Oswald Mosley, and set herself up as Mosley's mistress - a course of action that horrified her family and scandalised society. In 1933 she took her sister Unity to Germany; soon both had met the new German leader, Adolf Hitler. Diana became so close to him that when she and Mosley married in 1936 the ceremony took place in the Goebbels drawing room and Hitler was guest of honour. She continued to visit Hitler until a month before the outbreak of war; and afterwards, for many, years, refused to believe in the reality of the Holocaust. This gripping book is a portrait of both an extraordinary individual and the strange, terrible world of political extremism in the 1930s.

Bright Young People

D J Taylor (Author)

Bright Young People/ Making the most of our youth/ They talk in the Press of our social success/ But quite the reverse is the truth. [Noel Coward]

The Bright Young People were one of the most extraordinary youth cults in British history. A pleasure-seeking band of bohemian party-givers and blue-blooded socialites, they romped through the 1920s gossip columns. Evelyn Waugh dramatised their antics in Vile Bodies and many of them, such as Anthony Powell, Nancy Mitford,Cecil Beaton and John Betjeman, later became household names. Their dealings with the media foreshadowed our modern celebrity culture and even today,we can detect their influence in our cultural life.

But the quest for pleasure came at a price. Beneath the parties and practical jokes was a tormented generation, brought up in the shadow of war, whose relationships - with their parents and with each other - were prone to fracture. For many, their progress through the 'serious' Thirties, when the age of parties was over and another war hung over the horizon, led only to drink, drugs and disappointment, and in the case of Elizabeth Ponsonby - whose story forms a central strand of this book - to a family torn apart by tragedy.

Moving from the Great War to the Blitz, Bright Young People is both a chronicle of England's 'lost generation' of the Jazz Age, and a panoramic portrait of a world that could accommodate both dizzying success and paralysing failure. Drawing on the writings and reminiscences of the Bright Young People themselves, D.J. Taylor has produced an enthralling social and cultural history, a definitive portrait of a vanished age.

A Walk in the Park

Travis Elborough (Author)

'A fascinating, informative, revelatory book' William Boyd, Guardian

Parks are such a familiar part of everyday life, you might be forgiven for thinking they have always been there. In fact, public parks are an invention. From their medieval inception as private hunting grounds through to their modern incarnation as public spaces of rest and relaxation, parks have been fought over by land-grabbing monarchs, reforming Victorian industrialists, hippies, punks, and somewhere along the way, the common folk trying to savour their single day of rest.

In A Walk in the Park, Travis Elborough excavates the history of parks in all their colour and complexity. Loving, funny and impassioned, this is a timely celebration of a small wonder that – in an age of swingeing cuts – we should not take for granted.

Thomas Becket

John Guy (Author)

From the winner of the 2004 Whitbread Biography Award and the Marsh Biography Award John Guy, comes Thomas Becket, a lively and enlightening new book that brings a colossal figure of British history vividly to life.

This is the man, not the legend . . .

Thomas Becket lived at the centre of medieval England. Son of a draper's merchant, he was befriended and favoured by Henry II and quickly ascended the rungs of power and privilege. He led 700 knights into battle, brokered peace between warring states and advised King and Pope. Yet he lost it all defying his closest friend and King, resulting in his own bloody murder and the birth of a legend. In John Guy's masterful account the life, death and times of Thomas Becket come splendidly alive.

'Lively, effortlessly readable, superb. A triumph' The Times

'Suspenseful, meticulously researched . . . however well you think you know the story, it is well worth the read' Financial Times

'Wonderfully moving and subtle. Reading of the assassination is almost unbearably intense and brings tears to one's eye' Daily Express

'Compelling, marvellously measured, entertainingly astute, and in places positively moving' The Independent

'A beautifully layered portrait of one of the most complex characters in English history . . . not only corrects many historical errors and uncertainties, but merits reading more than once, for the sheer joy of its superb storytelling' The Times

'Scintillates with energetic scene-setting, giving us a tactile, visual feel for early medieval England . . . breathes new life into an oft-told tale' Financial Times

'Vivid and extremely readable. The most accessible Life of Thomas Becket to be published in recent years' The Times Literary Supplement

John Guy is an award-winning historian, accomplished broadcaster and a Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge. His previous books include My Heart is My Own: The Life of Mary Queen of Scots, winner of the 2004 Whitbread Biography Award and the Marsh Biography Award, the highly acclaimed dual biography A Daughter's Love: Thomas and Margaret More and a history, Tudor England, which has sold over 250,000 copies worldwide.

The Cuckoo Tree

Joan Aiken (Author)

While her friend Capt Hughes recovers from a carriage accident, Dido is marooned with the odd inhabitants of the Tegleaze estate. Soon suspicious things happen; a priceless possession is stolen, a boy kidnapped, a twin sister found and when Dido catches a glimpse of her rascally father in Petworth, she is sure she is in the midst of another wicked Hanoverian plot. Can she combat mass hypnotism, smugglers, and a gang of murderers to prevent the plot to put St Paul`s Cathedral in the River Thames?

River Cafe Italian Kitchen

Rose Gray (Author) , Ruth Rogers (Author)

The RIVER CAFE COOKBOOKS are a publishing phenomenon, with over a quarter of a million sold. Following a successful pilot on BBC, Rose Gray and Ruth Rogers were asked by Channel 4 to make a series in which they showed how to make some of their fantastic dishes and explained why they cook how they do. This unique book, which is photographed at both the River Cafe and in Italy, complements the existing cookbooks, contains all the recipes shown in the series 1 and 2 of ITALIAN KITCHEN and provides a platform for the authors to explain the philosophy behind their food with passion and verve.

We Are At War

Simon Garfield (Author)

Of all the accounts written about the Second World War, none are more compelling than the personal diaries of those who lived through it. We Are At War is the story of five everyday folk, who, living on the brink of chaos, recorded privately on paper their most intimate hopes and fears.

Pam Ashford, a woman who keeps her head when all around are losing theirs, writes with comic genius about life in her Glasgow shipping office. Christopher Tomlin, a writing-paper salesman for whom business is booming, longs to be called up like his brother. Eileen Potter organises evacuations for flea-ridden children, while mother-of-three Tilly Rice is frustrated to be sent to Cornwall. And Maggie Joy Blunt tries day-by-day to keep a semblance of her ordinary life.

Entering their world as they lived it, each diary entry is poignantly engrossing. Amid the tumultuous start to the war, these ordinary British people are by turns apprehensive and despairing, spirited and cheerful - and always fascinatingly, vividly real.

No Angel

M Malone (Author)

Leather. Fetishes. SM. The words conjure up a multitude of feelings for erotic fiction writer Sally Avery, for Sally has a secret. Despite her explicitly written prose, she is relatively inexperienced when it comes to forbidden pleasures. Frightened by the depth of her yearnings, she starts to explore her darker side with other women. Her journey to self-discovery begins in the sleazy, sexy fetish clubs of Brighton...


Henry Green (Author) , Sebastian Yorke (Author)

Blindness is Henry Green's first novel. Begun when the author was still at school, it tells the story of a clever and artistic boy who, blinded in a senseless accident, turns to writing with powers extraordinarily heightened by his affliction. With a total lack of sentimentality Henry Green explores the youth's adaptation to his changed and darkened life.

Blindness has been much referred to and much discussed by Green's admirers, but for many years has been impossible to obtain. Its reissue coincides with the increasing recognition of Green's stature as a major modern English novelist.

Just For Christmas

Scarlett Bailey (Author)

Her best friend’s wedding...

When Alex Munro learns that the love of her life is getting married to another girl, all she wants is to be alone – and as far away from Edinburgh as possible.

Moving to a Cornish cottage, which comes complete with the world’s scruffiest dog, Alex finds that her new neighbours are determined to involve her in their madcap Christmas festivities.

Then she meets her sexy neighbour Ruan – and somehow Alex doesn’t want to be alone this Christmas after all. But having lost one fiancée, Ruan has no intention of letting anyone get close to him again...

Nutmeg and Custard

Marcus Wareing (Author)

In Marcus Wareing's Nutmeg & Custard, you'll find a recipe for every occasion to suit every taste. Ideal for the aspiring home cook and anyone who loves great food, Marcus' recipes are all about bringing out the very best in simple ingredients.

Inspired by everything from childhood memories to travels abroad, Nutmeg & Custard is jam-packed with over 150 stunning recipes from smoky pulled-pork butties and spiced seafood chowder to the beautifully simple pesto popcorn and the wonderfully comforting home-made crumpets with burnt honey butter.

It's the kind of family-friendly food that begs to be shared time and time again, so celebrate the very best of home cooking with this ultimate collection of indulgent recipes.

The Good Pub Guide 2019

Fiona Stapley (Author)

Britain's bestselling travel guide for over 30 years and the only truly independent guide of its kind.

The 37th edition of this much-loved book is as irreplaceable as ever. Organised county by county, its yearly updates and reader recommendations ensure that only the best pubs make the grade.

Here you will not only find a fantastic range of countryside havens, bustling inns and riverside retreats, but also a growing number of gastropubs and pubs specialising in malt whiskey and craft beers.

Discover the top pubs in each county for beer, food and accommodation, and find out the winners of the coveted titles of Pub of the Year and landlord of the Year. Packed with hidden gems, The Good Pub Guide continues to provide a wealth of honest, entertaining and up-to-date information on the countries drinking establishments.

Never Say Never

Melissa Hill (Author)

Sometimes hopes and dreams don't go according to plan - sometimes, real life gets in the way.

On a mild May evening, a group of friends on the verge of graduating speculate on what the future holds. Will Leah be a chef? Robin an accountant? And Olivia the one who holds it all together? The one thing they know is that they'll always be friends - no matter what - but they make a pact to meet up in five years, just in case fate intervenes.

Years later it's clear that life has not gone according to plan. Why is Robin in New York determined never to go back to Dublin? Why is Olivia grieving? And why does Leah feel so left out as she heads towards the big three-o?

When Robin is forced to return, they all find themselves face to face with the past - suddenly nothing can ever be the same again. And they start to realize that sometimes it's best never to say never ...

Salt & Old Vines

Richard W. H. Bray (Author)

Grab a bottle of wine, and a glass. Pop it open. Pour. Hold it up to the light and see how the colour dances under it. See how bright it is, how it seems to generate its own light. Swirl it, and don't worry if you spill a bit. Have a sniff; get your nose in. Take a sip. Savour it, let it fill your mouth…

Wine, claims Richard Bray, is a happy accident. Its journey from vine to bottle is fraught, and involves lots of human, fallible people. Men and women who've been picking grapes since six in the morning, or working the press since six-thirty; people who get hurt, who sweat, who bleed, who don't finish until late and need a beer at the end of the day; winemakers who started off as blues guitarists, and octogenarian Catalan farmers who hand-cut grapes faster than their grandchildren.

Salt & Old Vines is the story of wine, a portrait of some of its people, and a biography of the place it comes from. Inspired by his own experience making wine at Coume del Mas and Mas Cristine in the Rousillon, Richard Bray gives readers a real taste of the winemaking process.

Get your nose in there again. Has it changed at all? What’s different? Take a sip, a bigger one. Let it linger. Finish the glass. The last sip is always the best…

The Prawn Cocktail Years

Lindsey Bareham (Author) , Simon Hopkinson (Author)

While Lindsey Bareham was helping Simon Hopkinson put together his best-selling book, Roast Chicken and Other Stories, the two of them began to reminisce about hotel and restaurant dishes they had grown up with and always loved; those Cinderellas of the kitchen that we abandoned in our quest for the wilder shores of gastronomy. Classics such as Duck a l’Orange, Weiner Schnitzel, Moussaka, Garlic Mushrooms and, of course, Prawn Cocktail, have all been slung out like old lovers but when made with fine, fresh ingredients and prepared with care and a genuine love of good eating, these former favourites should grace the most discerning of tables.

The Prawn Cocktail Years sets out to rehabilitate the food we once loved and found exciting. In so doing, the authors take us on a cook’s tour of the legendary post-war hotels and gentlemen’s clubs with their Mulligatawny and Shepherd’s Pie, to the bistros of Swinging London where Paté Maison and sizzling Escargots excited the braver palate. Then there were the first Italian trattorias where Saltimbocca and Oranges in Caramel were the order of the day and the ‘Continental’ restaurants with their exotic offerings of Beef Stroganoff, Chicken Kiev and Rhum Baba. Recipes for all these old favourites have been brought back to life as well as those classics that were once described as the Great British Meal - Prawn Cocktail, Steak Garni with Chips and Black Forest Gateau. Cooked as they should be, this much derided and often ridiculed dinner is still something very special indeed. The prawn cocktail years are staging a comeback . . .

New Hip And Thigh Diet Cookbook

Patricia Bourne (Author) , Rosemary Conley (Author)

Eat your way to diet success with over 100 superb new recipes

The Hip and Thigh Diet has revolutionized the eating habits of successful slimmers across the world. Now, with this enticing new cookbook you can eat well and healthily and keep those unwanted pounds and inches at bay. Over 100 brand-new, mouthwatering recipes are included to help you cook for all the family, and any occasion.

Family favourites, re-created the Conley way
Quick and simple recipes in under 30 minutes
Impressive but easy entertaining
Robust recipes for everyday use
Spicy new dishes for vegetarians and vegans
Sumptuous desserts and party food

Packed with gastronomical delights from the exotic to the economical, there has never been a tastier way to stay slim.

Houses of Power

Simon Thurley (Author)

What was it like to live as a royal Tudor? Why were their residences built as they were and what went on inside their walls? Who slept where and with who? Who chose the furnishings? And what were their passions?

The Tudors ruled through the day, throughout the night, in the bath, in bed and in the saddle. Their palaces were genuine power houses - the nerve-centre of military operations, the boardroom for all executive decisions and the core of international politics. Houses of Power is the result of Simon Thurley's thirty years of research, picking through architectural digs, and examining financial accounts, original plans and drawings to reconstruct the great Tudor houses and understand how these monarchs shaped their lives. Far more than simply an architectural history - a study of private life as well as politics, diplomacy and court - it gives an entirely new and remarkable insight into the Tudor world.


· Baynard’s Castle
· Bridewell Palace
· Coldharbour
· Durham Place
· Eltham Palace
· Friars’ churches at Greenwich and Richmond
· Kennington Palace
· Blackfriars
· Palace of Westminster
· Somerset Place
· St James’s Palace
· St Paul’s
· Suffolk Place
· Tower of London
· Westminster Abbey
· Whitehall Palace (formerly York Place)
· Dartford Priory
· Enfield
· Esher Place
· Hampton Court Palace
· Hanworth House
· Havering-atte-Bower
· Nonsuch Palace
· Oatlands Palace
· Richmond Palace
· Syon Monastery
· Wanstead House
· Windsor Castle
· Woking Palace
· Abingdon Abbey (now in Oxfordshire)
· Reading Abbey
· Ditton House
· Basing House
· Birling House
· Cobham Hall
· Dover Castle
· Knole
· Leeds Castle
· Otford
· Rochester Priory
· St Augustine’s Priory, Canterbury
· Westenhanger Castle
· Woodstock Palace
· Guildford Friary
· Woking House
· Cowdray House
· Petworth House
· Beaulieu (formerly New Hall)
· Ingatestone Hall
· Ruckholt Manor
· Ewelme Manor
· Thornbury Castle
· Wolfhall
· Loughborough Hall
· Burghley House
· Collyweston House
· Fotheringay Castle
· Grafton Manor
· Nottingham Castle
· Ludlow Castle
· Kenilworth Castle
· Royal House, Langley
· Tickenhill Manor
· Ampthill House
· Ashridge Priory
· Berkhampstead Castle
· Hatfield House
· Hitchin
· Hundson House
· Manor of the More
· Theobalds House
· Tyttenhanger House
· Kenninghall Place
· Hengrave Hall
· Newcastle
· Warkworth Castle
· Hull Manor
· Middleham Castle
· Pontefract Castle
· York Abbey

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