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Here Come the Dogs

Omar Musa (Author)

In small town suburbia, three young men are ready to make their mark.

Solomon is all charisma, authority and charm, down for the moment but surely not out. His half-brother, Jimmy, bounces along in his wake, underestimated, waiting for his chance to announce himself. Aleks, their childhood friend, loves his mates, his family and his homeland, and would do anything for them. The question is, does he know where to draw the line?

Solomon, Jimmy and Aleks: way out on the fringe of Australia, looking for a way in. Hip hop and graffiti give them a voice. Booze, women and violence pass the time while they wait for their chance. Under the oppressive summer sun, their town has turned tinder-dry. All it'll take is a spark.

As the surrounding hills roar with flames, the change storms in. But it's not what they were waiting for. It never is.

How to Get Filthy Rich In Rising Asia

Mohsin Hamid (Author)

This book is a self-help book. Its objective, as it says on the cover, is to show you how to get filthy rich in rising Asia. And to do that it has to find you, huddled, shivering, on the packed earth under your mother's cot one cold, dewy morning. Your anguish is the anguish of a boy whose chocolate has been thrown away, whose remote controls are out of batteries, whose scooter is busted, whose new sneakers have been stolen. This is all the more remarkable since you've never in your life seen any of these things . . .

Light Boxes

Shane Jones (Author)

February is persecuting the townspeople. It has been winter for more than three hundred days. All forms of flight are banned and the children have started to disappear, taken from their beds in the middle of the night. The priests hang ominous sheets of parchment on the trees, signed 'February'. And somewhere on the outskirts of the town lives February himself, with the girl who smells of honey and smoke...

In short bursts of intensely poetic language, this beautifully strange and otherworldly first novel tells the story of the people in the town and their efforts to combat the mysterious spectre of February. Steeped in visual imagery, this is a hauntingly enigmatic modern fairy tale - in which nothing is as it seems.

Here

Richard McGuire (Author)

Here is Richard McGuire's unique graphic novel based on the legendary 1989 comic strip of the same name.

Richard McGuire's groundbreaking comic strip Here was published under Art Spiegelman's editorship at RAW in 1989.

Built in six pages of interlocking panels, dated by year, it collapsed time and space to tell the story of the corner of a room - and its inhabitants - between the years 500,957,406,073 BC and 2033 AD.

The strip remains one of the most influential and widely discussed contributions to the medium, and it has now been developed, expanded and reimagined by the artist into this full-length, full-colour graphic novel - a must for any fan of the genre.

'From now on, McGuire will be known as the author of the novel Here, because it's a work of literature and art unlike any seen or read before. A book like this comes along once a decade, if not a century' Chris Ware, Guardian

'Promises to leapfrog immediately to the front ranks of the graphic-novel genre' New York Times

Richard McGuire is a regular contributor to the New Yorker magazine. He has written and illustrated both children's books and experimental comics. His work has appeared in The New York Times, McSweeney's, Le Monde and Libération. He has written and directed two omnibus feature films, designed and manufactured his own line of toys, and is also the founder and bass player of the band Liquid Liquid.

Gods Without Men

Hari Kunzru (Author)

In the Californian desert a small, autistic child goes missing. A British rock star goes quietly mad. An alien-worshipping cult is born. An Iraqi teenager takes part in a war game.

In an odd, remote town, near a rock formation known as The Pinnacles, lives and experiences intertwine, stories entangle and echo, and the search for meaning, pattern and connection in a dying universe continues.

'Compulsively readable, skilfully orchestrated . . . this really is Kunzru's great American novel' Independent

The David Foster Wallace Reader

David Foster Wallace (Author)

The David Foster Wallace Reader is a selection of David Foster Wallace's work, introducing readers to his humour, kindness, sweeping intellect and versatility as a writer.

A compilation from the one of the most original writers of our age, featuring:

· the very best of his fiction and non-fiction;
· previously unpublished writing
· and original contributions from 12 prominent authors and critics about his work

From classic short fiction to genre-defining reportage, this book is a must for new readers and confirmed David Foster Wallace fans alike'One of the most dazzling luminaries of contemporary American fiction' Sunday Times

'There are times, reading his work, when you get halfway through a sentence and gasp involuntarily, and for a second you feel lucky that there was, at least for a time, someone who could make sense like no other of what it is to be a human in our era' Daily Telegraph

'A prose magician, Mr. Wallace was capable of writing . . .about subjects from tennis to politics to lobsters, from the horrors of drug withdrawal to the small terrors of life aboard a luxury cruise ship, with humour and fervour and verve' Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

David Foster Wallace wrote the novels The Pale King, Infinite Jest, and The Broom of the System and three story collections. His nonfiction includes Consider the Lobster and A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again. He died in 2008.

The Shape of Bones

Daniel Galera (Author) , Alison Entrekin (Translator)

'Like a cross of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao and American Psycho' Financial Times

From one of Brazil's foremost literary voices comes a gripping, visceral new novel about youth, power and the nature of manhood

A man rises at 5 a.m. and leaves his home. He does not wake his wife or child to bid them goodbye. He starts his car - an SUV filled with survival gear - but does not drive to his friend's house as planned. Instead he glides through the sleeping streets of Porto Alegre, haunted by ghosts of himself: the fearless boy riding a battered stunt bike, the silent adolescent fascinated by bodies and violence, the obsessive young surgeon, the distant husband.

As the dawn comes on and people slowly fill the streets, the man drives unthinkingly, inexorably, toward the old neighbourhood of his youth. What is pulling him back there? Perhaps the need to make something happen, perhaps just nostalgia. Or perhaps the search for absolution - from a crime he has carried in his heart for fifteen years.

To Be Continued

James Robertson (Author)

SHORTLISTED FOR THE WODEHOUSE COMIC FICTION PRIZE 2017

An utterly mad, entirely heart-warming Highland adventure from the Man Booker-longlisted author of And the Land lay Still

Douglas is fifty years old - he's just lost his job, been kicked out by his girlfriend and moved back into his dad's house. Just when things are starting to look hopeless, he makes a very unexpected new friend: a talking toad.

Mungo is a wise-cracking, straight-talking, no-nonsense kind of toad - and he is determined to get Douglas's life back on track. Together, man and beast undertake a madcap quest to the distant Highlands, hot on the trail of a hundred-year-old granny, a beautiful Greek nymph, a split-personality alcoholic/teetotaller, a reluctant whisky-smuggler, and the elusive glimmer of redemption . . .

Stories

Susan Sontag (Author)

The complete short stories of Susan Sontag, one of the most brilliant & influential writers of the twentieth century - collected together for the first time

Susan Sontag is most often remembered as a brilliant essayist - inquisitive, analytical, fearlessly outspoken. Yet all throughout her life, she also wrote short stories: fictions which wrestled with those ideas and preoccupations she couldn't address in essay form. These short fictions are allegories, parables, autobiographical vignettes, each capturing an authentic fragment of life, dramatizing Sontag's private griefs and fears.

Stories collects all of Sontag's short fiction for the first time. This astonishingly versatile collection showcases its peerless writer at the height of her powers. For any Sontag fan, it is an unmissable testament to her creative achievements.

War of the Encyclopaedists

Christopher Robinson (Author) , Gavin Kovite (Author)

War of the Encyclopaedists is Christopher Robinson and Gavin Kovite's dazzling literary debut.

On a summer night in an arty enclave of Seattle, friends Mickey Montauk and Halifax Corderoy throw one last blowout party before their lives part ways. They had planned to move together to Boston, but global events have intervened: Montauk has just learnt that his National Guard unit will deploy to Baghdad at the end of the summer. And Corderoy is faced with a moral dilemma: his girlfriend Mani has just been evicted and he must decide whether or not to abandon her when she needs him most. The year that follows will transform them all.

'This book has sweep and heart and humour. It captures coming of age during foreign wars and domestic malaise, and it does so with electrifying insight' Mary Karr, author of The Liars' Club

'As bizarre, hilarious and devastating as the past decade . . . Simultaneously a coming-of-age story, a war story, and a story of the disaffected millennial generation for whom the war hardly happened at all' Phil Klay, author of Redeployment

Blood-Drenched Beard

Daniel Galera (Author) , Alison Entrekin (Translator)

Blood-Drenched Beard is the gripping, visceral English-language debut from Daniel Galera.

His father shoots himself, and all he's left with is the old cattle dog and a vague desire for explanation. He loves swimming so he drifts south to Garopaba, a quiet little town on the Brazilian coast, where his grandfather disappeared in mysterious, possibly brutal, circumstances decades before.

There, in the midst of romantic flings and occasional trips, he comes to discover more than he could ever have imagined - not just about his grandfather, but also about himself.

Praise for Daniel Galera:

'Outstandingly powerful'- Estado de Sao Paulo

'The writer who has evolved more than any other of his generation'- NoMinimo

Daniel Galera was born in Sao Paulo in 1979. He co-founded the influential publishing house Livros do Mal, and has translated David Foster Wallace, Zadie Smith and Irvine Welsh into Brazilian Portuguese. He has published a collection of short stories and three novels, as well as an acclaimed graphic novel (with Rafael Coutinho).

The Unloved

Deborah Levy (Author)

A hypnotising summer novel from the twice Man Booker-shortlisted author of Hot Milk and Swimming Home

A group of hedonistic West European tourists gather to celebrate Christmas in a remote French chateau. Then an Englishwoman is brutally murdered, and the sad, eerie child Tatiana declares she knows who did it.

The subsequent inquiry into the death proves to be more of an investigation into the nature of love, insatiable rage and sadistic desire. The Unloved offers a bold and revealing look at some of the events that shaped European and African history, and the perils of a future founded on concealed truth.

Mr Loverman

Bernardine Evaristo (Author)

Bernardine Evaristo's Mr Loverman: 'Brokeback Mountain with ackee and saltfish and old people' Dawn French

Barrington Jedidiah Walker is seventy-four and leads a double life. Born and bred in Antigua, he's lived in Hackney since the sixties. A flamboyant, wise-cracking local character with a dapper taste in retro suits and a fondness for quoting Shakespeare, Barrington is a husband, father and grandfather - but he is also secretly homosexual, lovers with his great childhood friend, Morris.

His deeply religious and disappointed wife, Carmel, thinks he sleeps with other women. When their marriage goes into meltdown, Barrington wants to divorce Carmel and live with Morris, but after a lifetime of fear and deception, will he manage to break away?

Mr Loverman is a ground-breaking exploration of Britain's older Caribbean community, which explodes cultural myths and fallacies and shows the extent of what can happen when people fear the consequences of being true to themselves.

Praise for Bernardine Evaristo:

'One of Britain's most innovative authors . . . Bernardine Evaristo always dares to be different' New Nation

'Evaristo remains an undeniably bold and energetic writer, whose world view is anything but one-dimensional' Sunday Times

'Audacious genre-bending, in-yer-face wit and masterly retellings of underwritten corners of history are the hallmarks of Evaristo's work' New Statesman

Bernardine Evaristo is the author of seven books including three critically acclaimed verse novels, Lara, The Emperor's Babe and Soul Tourists. Mr Loverman is her second prose novel, after 2008's Blonde Roots, which was longlisted for the Orange Prize and won the Orange Prize Youth Panel Award. Evaristo's other awards include the EMMA Best Book, Arts Council Award and the Big Red Read Award. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and was awarded an MBE in 2009. She lives in London.

Swallowing Geography

Deborah Levy (Author)

Swallowing Geography is a stunning early novel by the Man Booker-shortlisted Deborah Levy.

Embedded in this beautifully written novel is Deborah Levy's gift for blending fairytale with biting satire. Through the voice of the irreverent and ironic narrator J.K., Swallowing Geography interrogates the yearning of discontented children, imagined homes and strangers and histories at the turbulent close of the 20th century.

'A stunningly original writer' Kirsty Gunn

'One of the few British writers comfortable on a world stage' New Statesman

'Levy's strength is her originality of thought and expression' Jeanette Winterson

Deborah Levy writes fiction, plays and poetry. Her work has been staged by the Royal Shakespeare Company, and she is the author of highly praised books including The Unloved, Things I Don't Want to Know, Beautiful Mutants and Billy and Girl. Her novel Swimming Home was shortlisted for the 2012 Man Booker Prize, 2012 Specsavers National Book Awards (UK Author of the Year) and 2013 Jewish Quarterly Wingate Prize, while the title story of her most recent work of fiction, Black Vodka, was shortlisted for the 2012 BBC International Short Story Award.

Beautiful Mutants

Deborah Levy (Author)

Beautiful Mutants is a stunning early novel by the Man Booker-shortlisted Deborah Levy.

Levy's surreal and artful first novel, Beautiful Mutants, introduces Lapinski -- the manipulative and magical Russian exile who summons forth a number of urban pilgrims in a shimmering contemporary allegory about broken dreams and desires . . .

'A stunningly original writer' Kirsty Gunn

'It throbs its way into the imagination like the unguided missiles it decries' Observer

'Levy's strength is her originality of thought and expression' Jeanette Winterson

Deborah Levy writes fiction, plays and poetry. Her work has been staged by the Royal Shakespeare Company, and she is the author of highly praised books including The Unloved, Things I Don't Want to Know, Swallowing Geography and Billy and Girl. Her novel Swimming Home was shortlisted for the 2012 Man Booker Prize, 2012 Specsavers National Book Awards (UK Author of the Year) and 2013 Jewish Quarterly Wingate Prize, while the title story of her most recent work of fiction, Black Vodka, was shortlisted for the 2012 BBC International Short Story Award.

White Tears

Hari Kunzru (Author)

'Like Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch... A stunning novel of ideas that becomes a page-turning thriller... ' Stylist

A dizzying, nail-biting ghost story about modern America from the bestselling author of The Impressionist

Two twenty-something New Yorkers: Seth, awkward and shy, and Carter, the trust fund hipster. They have one thing in common: an obsession with music. Rising fast on the New York producing scene, they stumble across an old blues song long forgotten by history -- and everything starts to unravel. Carter is drawn far down a path that allows no return, and Seth has no choice but to follow his friend into the darkness.

Electrifying, subversive and wildly original, White Tears is a ghost story and a love story, a story about lost innocence and historical guilt. This unmissable novel penetrates the heart of a nation's darkness, encountering a suppressed history of greed, envy, revenge and exploitation, and holding a mirror up to the true nature of America today.

Mother Land

Paul Theroux (Author)

A darkly hilarious portrait of one dysfunctional American family and its scheming matriarch

Everyone in Cape Cod thinks that Mother is a wonderful woman: pious, hard-working, frugal. Everyone except her husband and seven children. To them she is a selfish and petty tyrant -- endlessly comparing her many living children to the one who died in childbirth, keeping a vice-like hold on her offspring even as they try to escape into adulthood.

Welcome to Mother Land: a suffocating kingdom of parental narcissism. This is an engrossing, hilarious and heartbreaking portrait of a modern family -- the bickering, the conspiracies, and the drive to overcome the painful ties that bind.

The Ministry of Utmost Happiness

Arundhati Roy (Author)

LONGLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2017

THE SUNDAY TIMES #1 BESTSELLER and THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

'Magnificent - unlike anything I've read in years. An absolutely dazzling, original, and ultimately profound novel... A masterpiece. Very few writers can write with such intense and yet precise emotional intelligence. Arundhati Roy is properly special. We should be grateful to have her among us.' Mirza Waheed, author of The Book of Gold Leaves

'Roy's second novel proves as remarkable as her first' Financial Times

'A great tempest of a novel... which will leave you awed by the heat of its anger and the depth of its compassion' Washington Post

The first novel in 20 years from the Booker-prize winning author of The God of Small Things

The Ministry of Utmost Happiness takes us on a journey of many years-the story spooling outwards from the cramped neighbourhoods of Old Delhi into the burgeoning new metropolis and beyond, to the Valley of Kashmir and the forests of Central India, where war is peace and peace is war, and where, from time to time, 'normalcy' is declared.

Anjum, who used to be Aftab, unrolls a threadbare carpet in a city graveyard that she calls home. A baby appears quite suddenly on a pavement, a little after midnight, in a crib of litter. The enigmatic S. Tilottama is as much of a presence as she is an absence in the lives of the three men who loved her.

The Ministry of Utmost Happiness is at once an aching love story and a decisive remonstration. It is told in a whisper, in a shout, through tears and sometimes with a laugh. Its heroes are people who have been broken by the world they live in and then rescued, mended by love-and by hope. For this reason, they are as steely as they are fragile, and they never surrender. This ravishing, magnificent book reinvents what a novel can do and can be. And it demonstrates on every page the miracle of Arundhati Roy's storytelling gifts.

'A novel that demands and rewards the reader's concentration, this is a dazzling return to form' Independent

'This novel is a freedom song. Every page has the stamp of Roy's originality. Such brutality, such beauty' Amitva Kumar, the author of Immigrant, Montana

'Intricately layered and passionate, studded with jokes and with horrors... This is a work of extraordinary intricacy and grace' Prospect Magazine

'Gorgeous, supple, playful... Roy writes with astonishing vividness... Again and again beautiful images refresh our sense of the world' The New York Times Book Review

'A masterpiece. Roy joins Dickens, Naipaul, García Márquez, and Rushdie in her abiding compassion, storytelling magic, and piquant wit. An entrancing, imaginative, and wrenching epic' Booklist starred review

The Embassy of Cambodia

Zadie Smith (Author)

Revisiting the terrain of her acclaimed novel NW, The Embassy of Cambodia is another remarkable work of fiction from Zadie Smith.

'The fact is, if we followed the history of every little country in the world -- in its dramatic as well as its quiet times -- we would have no space left in which to live our own lives or apply ourselves to our necessary tasks, never mind indulge in occasional pleasures, like swimming . . . '

First published in the New Yorker, The Embassy of Cambodia is a rare and brilliant story that takes us deep into the life of a young woman, Fatou, domestic servant to the Derawals and escapee from one set of hardships to another.

Beginning and ending outside the Embassy of Cambodia, which happens to be located in Willesden, north-west London, Zadie Smith's absorbing, moving and wryly observed story suggests how the apparently small things in an ordinary life always raise larger, more extraordinary questions.

'Its range is lightly immense... a fiction of consequences both global and heart-rendingly intimate' Guardian

'Smith serves up a smasher' Independent

Playful... unexpected and absolutely right... Skips to a beat all of its own' Times

Praise for NW:

'A triumph . . .modern London is explored in a dazzling portrait . . . every sentence sings' Guardian

'Intensely funny, richly varied, always unexpected. A joyous, optimistic, angry masterpiece. No better English novel will be published this year' Philip Hensher, Daily Telegraph

'Absolutely brilliant . . . So electrically authentic, it reads like surveillance transcripts' Lev Grossman, TIME

In the Garden of the Fugitives

Ceridwen Dovey (Author)

A literary tour-de-force examining desire, shame and power between men and women - two people start a conversation after years of silence, enacting a dangerous game of confession and reckoning

'It has been almost fifteen years. I've thought about you often, mostly unkindly. But there: I have thought about you.'

Vita is South African, but she lives in Australia. Royce is older, American, a ghost from her days as a freshman on a Harvard scholarship. In his own youth, Royce spent a fateful summer working on a dig in Pompeii, with a girl who would later be memorialized with a scholarship - the same one that Vita eventually received.

An extraordinary psychological thriller about male and female power, driven by a riveting and entirely unpredictable truth at its heart.

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