205 results 1-20

Pentti and Deathgirl

Emma Rendel (Author)

Emma Rendel is one of the most distinctive and original graphic artists at work today. She joins the Cape list with the extraordinary Pentti and Deathgirl, two strange tales in one beautiful volume.

'Pentti' is the story of two Finnish brothers, Juha and Pentti. When two men move in next to their farm, Pentti is convinced they must be gay. 'So what?' says Juha, but Pentti, full of drink and righteous anger, storms off into town looking for a fight.

'Deathgirl's Diary' tells of Deathgirl, lonely and friendless, talking only to her diary, where she confides her obsessions: stabbing, beheading, poisoning...

George Sprott

Seth (Author)

Seth's graphic novel tells the story of George Sprott, the host of a long-running and unaccountably popular Canadian television programme, Northern Hi-Lights, in which he shows old films of the Arctic, while 'rambling on in a monotone voice about Eskimos or seal hunts or snowstorms' and often falling asleep on-air.

On the surface George seems a charming, foolish, old man, but as we come to know him, piece by piece, in a series of'interviews', flashbacks and personal reminiscences a more complex picture emerges.

Another small masterpiece by the author of It's a Good Life If You Don't Weaken and Wimbledon Green, George Sprott is a story about time, identity, loss and the persistence of memory. It's beautifully drawn and often very funny.

Aya of Yop City

Marguerite Abouet (Author) , Clément Oubrerie (Illustrator)

For the residents of Yopougon, everyday life is good. It is the early 1970s, a golden time - work is plentiful, hospitals are clean and well equipped, and school is obligatory. The Ivory Coast is as an island of relative wealth and stability in West Africa. For the teenagers of the town, though, worries are plentiful, and life in Yop City is far from simple.

Aya tells the story of its nineteen-year-old heroine, the clear-sighted and bookish Aya, and her carefree and fun-loving friends Adjoua and Bintou. Navigating meddling relatives and neighbours, the girls spend a last summer of their childhood on the sun-warmed streets of Yop City - sneaking out for dancing at open-air bars, strong solibra beer, chicken in peanut sauce and avoiding at all costs the scandal pages of the Calamity Morning....

Aya is a captivating, colourful and hugely entertaining portrayal of an Africa we rarely see, spirited and resilient, and full of the sounds, sights and smells of a prosperous town and its varied inhabitants.

Tamara Drewe

Posy Simmonds (Author)

Winner of the Grand Prix 2009 de la Critique Bande Dessinée.

Tamara Drewe has transformed herself. Plastic surgery, a different wardrobe, a smouldering look, have given her confidence and a new and thrilling power to attract, which she uses recklessly. Often just for the fun of it.

People are drawn to Tamara Drewe, male and female. In the remote village where her late mother lived Tamara arrives to clear up the house. Here she becomes an object of lust, of envy, the focus of unrequited love, a seductress. To the village teenagers she is 'plastic-fantastic', a role model. Ultimately, when her hot and indiscriminate glances lead to tragedy, she is seen as a man-eater, a heartless home-wrecker, a slut.

First appearing as a serial in the Guardian, in book form Tamara Drewe has been enlarged, embellished and lovingly improved by the author.

The Vicar Woman

Emma Rendel (Author)

A female vicar arrives on a small island to take up a new post. It is a strange opportunity: the parish is brand new, and set up by the community itself, who have built themselves a church modelled on St Peter's Basilica.

The vicar is surprised and delighted by the enthusiastic welcome she receives. The church is full day after day, and the parishioners compete for her attention. Not many are interested in discussing spiritual matters however, and as she gets to know them, the vicar becomes aware of a split in the community; a terrible secret that is not spoken of, but which plagues the island, pitting neighbour against neighbour.

She hears whispers of a missing young girl whose parents died in a mysterious blaze, of secret abortions, and of a fearsome ghost.

Vicar Woman is a strange and discomforting story, and a brilliant new work from one of the most original artists on the Cape graphic novel list.

Robert Crumb's Book of Genesis

Robert Crumb (Author)

Envisioning the first book of the Bible like no one before him, R. Crumb, the legendary illustrator, retells the story of Genesis in a profoundly honest and deeply moving way.

Now, readers of every persuasion can gain astonishing new insights from these stories. Crumb's Book of Genesis reintroduces us to the bountiful tree-lined garden of Adam and Eve, the massive ark of Noah with beasts of every kind, the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah destroyed by brimstone and fire, and the Egypt of the Pharaoh. Using clues from the text and peeling away the theological and scholarly interpretations that have often obscured the Bible's most dramatic stories, Crumb fleshes out a parade of biblical originals: from the serpent in Eden, the humanoid reptile appearing like an alien out of a science fiction movie, to Jacob, a 'kind of depressed guy who doesn't strike you as physically courageous', and his bother, Esau, 'a rough and kick-ass guy', to God himself, 'a standard Charlton Heston-like figure with long white hair and a flowing beard'.

Crumb's Book of Genesis, the culmination of five years of painstaking work, is a tapestry of masterly detail and storytelling that celebrates the astonishing diversity of one of our greatest artistic geniuses.

5 Is The Perfect Number

Igor Tuveri (Author)

5 is the Perfect Number is the story of an old Mafioso who is forced out of retirement when his son is murdered. He lays down his fishing rod and picks up his pistols and goes looking for revenge.

Spare, romantic, surreal, 5 is the Perfect Number introduces one of the new European masters to British readers.

Whitman Illuminated

Walt Whitman (Author) , Allen Crawford (Illustrator)

Walt Whitman's iconic collection of poems, Leaves of Grass, has earned a reputation as a sacred American text. Whitman himself made such comparisons, going so far as to use biblical verse as a model for his own. So it's only appropriate that artist and illustrator Allen Crawford has chosen to illuminate - like medieval monks with their own holy scriptures - Whitman's masterpiece and the core of his poetic vision, 'Song of Myself'. Crawford has turned the original sixy-page poem from Whitman's 1855 edition into a sprawling 234-page work of art. The handwritten text and illustrations intermingle in a way that's both surprising and wholly in tune with the spirit of the poem - they're exuberant, rough and wild.

Whitman Illuminated: Song of Myself is a sensational reading experience, an artefact in its own right and a masterful tribute to one of America's greatest poets.

Adamtine

Hannah Berry (Author) , Hannah Berry (Illustrator)

All people could do was speculate on the fate of those who vanished - strangers; seemingly random, unconnected: all plucked from their lives and never seen again. The notes found left behind, apparently describing some slender reason for their removal, were all that linked them. They were all delivered by one man.

Rodney Moon had admitted seeing those who had been disappeared and to passing the notes, but denied any involvement beyond that. Who wrote the letters, then? Moon shrugged during the trial: 'It has no name,' he said. 'It's a bogeyman. A monster.'

He was not mourned when the vengeful bereft finally found him.

Some years later, four strangers; seemingly random, unconnected, all take the last train home. But something each of them has forgotten - or is trying to forget - is catching up with them; with a terrible, inexorable purpose. The devil is in the detail, as they say.

The Art of Pho

Julian Hanshaw (Author)

The noodle soup called pho is the national dish of Vietnam. When Little Blue-- having been dropped by a mysterious man with a red car and being told to count to 500 -- finds himself in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam's baffling, daunting capital, his salvation is his own mobile pho stand. Little Blue's relationship with the city and its food brings an understanding to what it means to never want to return home and the fact that everyone goes away in the end.

Beautifully drawn and coloured, and featuring many delicious recipes for pho, this is a startlingly original and immensely appealing graphic novel by a brilliant new talent.

Play the interactive motion comic at http://artofpho.submarinechannel.com/

Gemma Bovery

Posy Simmonds (Author)

The brilliant graphic novel behind the major new film starring Gemma Aterton (Quantum of Solace), Jason Flemyng (Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels), Fabrice Luchini (In the House) and Mel Raido (Spooks)

Gemma is the bored, pretty second wife of Charlie Bovery, the reluctant stepmother of his children and the bête-noire of his ex-wife. Gemma's sudden windfall and distaste for London take them across the Channel to Normandy, where the charms of French country living soon wear off.

Is it a coincidence that Gemma Bovery has a name rather like Flaubert's notorious heroine? Is it by chance that, like Madame Bovary, Gemma is bored, adulterous, and a bad credit risk? Is she inevitably doomed? These questions consume Gemma's neighbour, the intellectual baker, Joubert. Denying voyeurism, but nevertheless noting every change in the fit of her jeans, every addition to Gemma's wardrobe, her love-bites and lovers, Joubert, with the help of the heroine's diaries, follows her path towards ruin. Adultery and its consequences. Disappointment and deception. The English in France. Fat and slim. Then and now.

Dirty Beasts

Roald Dahl (Author) , Quentin Blake (Illustrator)

Meet the dirtiest beasts in the world! The comic creations in these rhymes can be bloodthirsty, gruesome and often act in unexpected ways. A collection of hilarious and naughty rhymes with a touch of the magical, and a dash of the dangerous…

Tiger, Tiger

Galaxy Craze (Author)

Lucy has always had a volatile marriage, one marked by frequent splits and reconciliations. So when she gathers up her two young children, May and Eden, and walks out on her husband Simon, no one is very surprised - until she leaves London for an ashram in California.

At first May is bewildered by this sudden removal, by the strange rituals of the ashram, and by the obeisance paid to the guru, Parvati, by her disciples. But her doubts are gradually broken down by the bond she forms with another teenage girl, the sensual and manipulative Sati. When Sati's mother gives birth to another daughter and the baby is handed over to Parvati, May watches as Lucy's faith is shaken and human instinct and decency can no longer be suppressed.

Craze's portrait of the ashram is informed by a wonderfully sly humour, and her evocation of the bewilderments of being a child of warring parents is as acute as it was in By the Shore.

The Three Incestuous Sisters

Audrey Niffenegger (Author)

Before she wrote The Time Traveler's Wife, now a bestseller all around the world, Audrey Niffenegger's books were beautiful, handmade, exquisitely illustrated tales, published in editions as small as ten copies. They took many years to create, were bought by collectors and have been seen by few people. At last, as part of its acclaimed and very successful list of graphic books, Cape is delighted to publish The Three Incestuous Sisters in a beautiful edition at an affordable price.

It is the story of three sisters, Clothilde, Ophile and Bettine, who live together in a lonely house by the sea. All three are rivals for the love of Paris, the lighthouse-keeper's son. When Paris chooses Bettine, and she becomes pregnant, the other sisters are jealous. Eventually, after the baby is born, they cause Bettine's death. Paris runs away to sea and Ophile, overwhelmed by remorse, throws herself from the lighthouse. Clothilde lives on in the house, sad and alone. Then one day a circus comes to town. In it is an amazing flying boy. She recognizes him as Bettine's child...

Literary Life Revisited

Posy Simmonds (Author)

First published in 2003, Literary Life became an instant classic as readers (and writers) delighted in watching Posy Simmonds skewer the pains and pretensions of the writer’s (and reader’s) calling with her inimitable flair for witty satire and sharp social observation. As well as all the cartoons and comic strips from the original edition, The Complete Literary Life includes 40 extra pages of cartoons, including the two series Rick Raker and Dr Derek, in which two very different heroes attempt to right the wrongs afflicting the writing world, one by brute force and skulduggery, the other with a silky bedside manner.

Coltrane

Paolo Parisi (Author)

'My music is the spiritual expression of what I am: my faith, my knowledge, my being...'

John Coltrane rose from a hard and impoverished childhood in North Carolina to become one of the greatest jazz musicians of all time. From session musician to band member of Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis, his raw talent and passion for experimentation inaugurated a new movement in music. Positioned at the beating heart of the 50s and 60s jazz world, Coltrane and his quartet created some of the most innovative and expressive music of the age, including the hit album My Favorite Things and the landmark work A Love Supreme.

Juxtaposing scenes from Coltrane's personal life - his military career, addictions, political activism and love affairs - against snapshots of his major recordings, Coltrane evokes an extraordinary life and the momentous historical events that formed its backdrop. It is a graphic novel that echoes his work in its structure and style, and forms a testament to a pioneer and legend, whose music continues to inspire to this day.

The Twits

Roald Dahl (Author) , Quentin Blake (Illustrator)

With filthy hair all over his face and horrid plots growing in his mind, Mr Twit is one of the nastiest people you'll ever meet and Mrs Twit is just as bad and even uglier!

But they don't stop at tricking each other: neighbouring children and even the local birds are in danger, and that's where the Muggle-Wumps come in. This family of monkeys has had enough of the Twits' tricks and, with the help of the handsome Roly-Poly Bird, they decide it's time for sweet revenge...

Notes From A Defeatist

Joe Sacco (Author)

Sacco paved the way for Palestine with his powerful triptych on modern war and its innocent victims, originally published in his comic Yahoo and collected here: 'When Good Bombs Happen to Bad People' chronicles the effect of aerial warfare on civilians, from Germany and Japan in World War II to Libya in 1986; 'More Women, More Children, More Quickly' is written from a victim's perspective, as Sacco illustrates his mother's harrowing experiences during Italian and German WWII raids on Malta; and 'How I Loved the War', Defeatist's centrepiece, is Sacco's impassioned but sardonic reflection on the Gulf War, and the surrounding propaganda and media circus. Published during the reign of Bush I, it has since acquired an even sharper relevance.

Defeatist also features Sacco's first (relatively) long-form piece, 'In the Company of Long Hair', a hilarious roadie's-eye view of an American punk band's eventful European tour from Amsterdam to Madrid, as well as 'Cartoon Genius', 'Voyage to the End of the Library', 'A Disgusting Experience', and 'On My Day Off', a cycle of funny and rueful autobiographic comics that display Sacco's graphic verve to its fullest extent.

Defeatist is rounded off with a large section of Sacco's earliest, pointedly satirical strips (none of which has been collected in book form before) and new introductions and notes by the author.

A combination of youthful indiscretions and mature masterworks, Notes from a Defeatist spotlights the work of a brilliant young artist as he defines the capabilities and potential of his chosen medium.

3"

Marc-Antoine Mathieu (Author)

This is a detective mystery.

It lasts only 3 seconds.

Which is enough time for a particle of light to travel 900,000 kilometres.

And as you follow it on its journey - through scenes of deadly drama and seeming innocence, as far as deep space and back - look into the blind spots and corners. There are clues there: connections between the characters, motives, intrigues, crimes and plots.

You are the detective.

Find the solution.

I'm Never Coming Back

Julian Hanshaw (Author)

I'm Never Coming Back is a collection of surreal, comic and mournful interweaving tales travelling across three continents. In each destination we zoom in on unusual lives and remarkable situations, each tale unknowingly impacting on the next.

In Rye train station a woman impulsively buys the same ticket as the man in front of her. The accidental journey leads her to Berlin. A novel way to run away from home.

At Heathrow Airport, a building perpetually busy with people coming and going, a traveller is visited by a memory that refuses to leave.

A tray of Singapore rice noodles cooked up in Christchurch takes on a life of its own.

Winchelsea. A lone letterbox in Britain's only desert is central to a friendship between a travelling chef and a deep-sea diver.

An old man realises that time is running out in Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. Elsewhere an out-of-towner meets a crab at a taco stand who seems to know more than any crab has a right to know.

The 'sound mirrors of Denge' reflect more than noise for one day-tripper.

And on Johnston Island a man struggles to hold onto his fading memories as his house slowly fills with pollen. Test Match Special seems to be the only foothold in reality.

The Art of Pho is now available as a live motion comic: http://artofpho.submarinechannel.com/

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