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We Remember the Blitz

Frank Shaw (Author) , Joan Shaw (Author)

'I went to the public baths and after I undressed I could hear someone whistling. I looked round to see if I could see anybody about, but I couldn't, so I got into the bath and lay back to relax. As soon as I did, of course, I looked up and saw a man putting in the glass windows that had been blown out the night before.' Joan Adams, Lichfield

On the night of 7 September 1940, bombs rained down on the defenceless and unprepared population of London for nine long hours. In November, raids spread to the rest of the country - starting in Coventry and taking in everywhere from Portsmouth, Cardiff, Belfast and Hull.

During the nine months of the Blitz, thousands of people were killed and injured, and thousands of buildings and homes destroyed. But, with stoicism and humour, life went on.

We Remember the Blitz is packed with vivid recollections from this important time in British history. Waking up in a damp shelter to the sound of bombing. Coming out of a cinema to discover that fires made night as bright as day. And, worst of all, the shock of seeing individuals and whole families killed in an instant. We hear from many who were there to pick up the pieces: ARP wardens, firemen - even the bakers, who would return to work under tarpaulin to ensure their neighbours had their daily loaf.

Filled with moving but often funny memories, We Remember the Blitz is a celebration of the British spirit, and clearly shows that the battle for Britain was won by 'the many'.

The Gladiator

Alan Baker (Author)

Alan Baker weaves an extraordinary, vivid picture of Roman life as his compelling and evocative history tells the story of Rome's most notable gladiators. They were condemned and feared by emperors, slaughtered and adored by the masses and worshipped by their female fans, yet their lives were invariably violently short.

Whether their enemy was a starved tiger or a battle-hardened criminal, their numbered days were dark and bloody. Yet men gave up their wealth and freedom to become gladiators and noble-women gave up their positions to be with them. The Gladiator illuminates the extraordinary lives of Spartacus, Commodus, Eppia and others - bringing the same energy and passion to the page that Ridley Scott's cinematic triumph bough to the screen.

Forgotten Voices of the Blitz and the Battle For Britain - Part 2

Joshua Levine (Author) , Simon MacCorkindale (Read by)

Drawing material from the Imperial War Museum's extensive aural archive, Joshua Levine brings together voices from both sides of the Blitz and the Battle of Britain to give us a unique, complete and compelling picture of this turbulent time.

We hear from the soldiers, airmen, fire-fighters, air-raid wardens and civilians, people in the air and on the ground, on both sides of the battle, giving us a thrilling account of Britain under siege. This is the definitive oral history of a period when Britain came closer to being overwhelmed by the enemy than at any other time in modern history.

The Battle of Britain

As Hitler proceeded with his invasion plans - code-named Operation Sealion - he knew that the RAF must not be allowed to threaten the invading forces as they crossed the Channel, and it was clear that they would have to be brought to battle and defeated. Still hopeful of a settlement, Hitler believed that a sustained aerial attack, coupled with a naval blockade, might bring Britain to the negotiating table. The Luftwaffe's specific aim was to win superiority by luring Fighter Command into the air and wiping it out. Fighter Command, with its pilots, aircraft and carefully considered systems of control, was waiting.

Forgotten Voices of the Blitz and the Battle For Britain - Part 1

Joshua Levine (Author) , Simon MacCorkindale (Read by)

Drawing material from the Imperial War Museum's extensive aural archive, Joshua Levine brings together voices from both sides of the Blitz and the Battle of Britain to give us a unique, complete and compelling picture of this turbulent time.

We hear from the soldiers, airmen, fire-fighters, air-raid wardens and civilians, people in the air and on the ground, on both sides of the battle, giving us a thrilling account of Britain under siege. This is the definitive oral history of a period when Britain came closer to being overwhelmed by the enemy than at any other time in modern history.

Dunkirk and the Threat of Invasion

On the day that Winston Churchill replaced Neville Chamberlain as Prime Minister, Germany invaded Holland and Belgium. Despite all the efforts of the Allied armies, Hitler's powerful Panzer divisions smashed their way through to the French coast. For the retreating British Expeditionary Force, Dunkirk was the only practical point of departure, and on May 26th the order for total evacuation - Operation Dynamo - was given. Over succeeding days the 'miracle' of Dunkirk took place, and almost half a million troops were rescued from the beaches. Meanwhile in Britain belated preparations were going on for the expected invasion - the Battle for Britain had begun.

Forgotten Voices of the Blitz and the Battle For Britain - Part 3

Joshua Levine (Author) , Simon MacCorkindale (Read by)

Drawing material from the Imperial War Museum's extensive aural archive, Joshua Levine brings together voices from both sides of the Blitz and the Battle of Britain to give us a unique, complete and compelling picture of this turbulent time.

We hear from the soldiers, airmen, fire-fighters, air-raid wardens and civilians, people in the air and on the ground, on both sides of the battle, giving us a thrilling account of Britain under siege. This is the definitive oral history of a period when Britain came closer to being overwhelmed by the enemy than at any other time in modern history.

The Blitz

From July to September 1940 the British people watched the Battle of Britain play out in the skies above them, aware that the eventual outcome would decide their fate.From September through to the following May, Hitler then attempted to 'blitz' London and other major cities into submission.For a year the citizens of Britain were effectively front-line soldiers in a battle which united the country against a hated enemy. Despite the terror, destruction and heavy casualties the British people survived the onslaught, until May 1941, when Hitler re-directed his attention, and that of the Luftwaffe, to the campaign in Russia.

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