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Dominion

Paul Lussier (Author)

A landmark account of the race to save the planet, by one of the world’s foremost experts on climate science

At the current rate of carbon pollution, we are we are likely to see the first wave of global catastrophes as a result of CO2 levels within the next twenty to twenty-five years. As a result, a group of scientists from around the world, backed by billionaires, oligarchs and dictators, are attempting to find other, more drastic solutions. The science of manipulating the earth’s climate (and nature itself) is known as ‘geoengineering’, and is looked to, by many, as the only way to save our planet. Current schemes include the creation of artificial sulphate clouds to cool the temperatures of regions; the dispersal of millions of tons of seawater into the atmosphere via aeroplane; and the sending of thousands of light-reflecting mirrors into space. All would, scientists claim, immediately lower the earth’s temperature, and slow (or stop) our current trajectory. But each also presents incalculable and possibly catastrophic risks.

Dominion is the first exploration of the race to save the planet – providing an authoritative examination of the history, science and mechanics of the various geoengineering schemes, their possible implications, and the extraordinary cast of characters – scientists, entrepreneurs, despots, ecologists, politicians – involved. It also points to what might save us from destruction: a new era of cooperation, and possibly the next stage in our evolution as a species.

Instructive, explosive and more urgent now than ever before, Dominion is an essential guide to our present and future, from one of the great scientific minds and communicators of this century.

The Protocol

Grigory Rodchenkov (Author)

Can one man take down an empire?

THE PROTOCOL is a breathtaking real-life political thriller.

As a leading chemical scientist and Director of the Moscow Anti-Doping Laboratory, Dr Grigory Rodchenkov was at the forefront of global efforts to detect drugs cheats in sport. Yet he was simultaneously running the most elaborate doping scheme in history, helping thousands of athletes and elite players evade detection. Then the cracks started to show, and Vladimir Putin sent him a chilling message . . .

Icarus, the Oscar-winning Netflix film, followed Grigory Rodchenkov as he turned whistleblower, fled Russia and entered the US Witness Protection Programme. In this explosive memoir he reveals how everything he has exposed so far — leading to Russia’s double Olympic bans – is merely the tip of the iceberg.

Drawn from diaries, official e-mails and memos smuggled out of Russia, The Protocol is the full story by the one man the Kremlin hoped would never talk about its quest to win at all costs.


‘I am a patriot, yet I am a traitor. I am one of the reasons my country has won so many Olympic medals over the last decade, yet I am also the reason they are banned from the Olympics. I am a devoted husband and father, yet I have seen neither my wife or my children in two years. If you read the news, you will see that my name is everywhere, yet I myself am nowhere. I am known throughout Russia, yet I am a ghost. Living anonymously in an anonymous town, under the protection of the US government, in fear from my life, somewhere in America – the one country I tried my hardest to help my country beat, year after year, decade after decade’

On the Edge

Richard Davies (Author)

To understand how humans react and adapt to change we need to study people who live in harsh environments. From the death-row prisoners trading in prisons where money is banned to the stateless ethnic Russians shut out of Estonia’s hyper-modern economy, every life in this book has been hit by a seismic shock, violently broken or damaged in some way.
People living in these odd and marginal places are ignored by number crunching economists and political pollsters alike. Science suggests this is a mistake.
This book tells the personal stories of humans living in extreme situations. 'Extreme' does not mean the familiar stock market crashes, housing crises, or banking scandals of the financial pages. The book takes the reader to really odd places, the places that no-one visits. Places where part of the economy has been repressed, removed, destroyed or turbocharged. By travelling to each of them and discovering what life is really like, On the Edge tells small stories that shed light on today’s biggest economic questions.

Chinese Thought

Roel Sterckx (Author)

How did the ancient Chinese think about the world? Why are human rights as a concept so controversial in China? What does environmental consciousness stand for in the Chinese tradition? Where does China's obsession with education come from? What gets lost in translation in the Chinese language?

We are often told that the twenty-first century is bound to become China's century. Never before has Chinese culture been so physically, digitally, economically or aesthetically present in everyday life in the Western world. In this enlightening book, Roel Sterckx takes us through centuries of Chinese history, with evocative examples from philosophy, politics and everyday life.

A deeply knowledgeable expert who has been studying the country's culture and language for years, Sterckx is the perfect guide who can show us how the ancient Chinese have shaped the thinking of a civilization that is now influencing our own.

Crucible

Charles Emmerson (Author)

What comes first: the character of the times, or the characters who give it theirs?

Crucible charts the trajectories of the characters who fell from power in the bloody breakdown of Europe’s old order between 1917 and 1924, and those who for whom the restless chaos marked the beginning of an unlikely rise to fame.

Year by year, we follow Kaiser Wilhelm into his wood-chopping Dutch exile, and Lenin from his Swiss library-desk to his muddled end as an invalid in revolutionary Russia gone stale. Ernest Hemingway criss-crosses the Atlantic in search of himself: soldier, hack journalist, writer, fisherman. Surrealism is born in a Paris attic. Europe suffers a nervous collapse, alternating between revolution and reaction. America takes fright. A Viennese doctor of eclectic tastes becomes an intellectual celebrity. An Austrian ex-soldier touts himself as the tribune of the German people.

Outside the classic frames of war and peace, these all-too-human tales – funny, tragic and fateful – tell a wider story of the exuberant dreams, dark fears, grubby ambition and sheer chance which marked Europe’s post-war metamorphosis, and the century to come.

The Boy Who Followed His Father into Auschwitz

Jeremy Dronfield (Author)

The inspiring, true story of a father and son's fight to stay together and to survive the Holocaust.

In 1939, Gustav Kleinmann, a Jewish upholsterer in Vienna, was seized by the Nazis. Along with his teenage son Fritz, he was sent to Buchenwald in Germany. There began an unimaginable ordeal that saw the pair beaten, starved and forced to build the very concentration camp they were held in.

When Gustav was set to be transferred to Auschwitz, a certain death sentence, Fritz refused to leave his side. Throughout the horrors they witnessed and the suffering they endured, there was one constant that kept them alive: the love between father and son.

Based on Gustav's secret diary and meticulous archive research, this book tells his and Fritz's story for the first time - a story of courage and survival unparalleled in the history of the Holocaust.

Talking to My Daughter

Yanis Varoufakis (Author)

‘Why is there so much inequality?’ Xenia asks her father, the world famous economist Yanis Varoufakis.

Drawing on memories of her childhood and a variety of well-known tales – from Oedipus and Faust to Frankenstein and The Matrix – Varoufakis explains everything you need to know in order to understand why economics is the most important drama of our times. In answering his daughter’s deceptively simple questions, Varoufakis disentangles our troubling world with remarkable clarity, while inspiring us to make it a better one.

Dark Mirror

Barton Gellman (Author)

Barton Gellman’s informant called himself ‘Verax’ – the truth-teller. It was only later that Verax unmasked himself as Edward Snowden. By that point he had already shared thousands of files with Gellman.

Dark Mirror is the ultimate inside account of the vast, global surveillance network that now pervades all our lives. Gellman’s primary role in bringing Snowden’s revelations to light, for which he shared the Pulitzer prize, is only the beginning of this gripping real-life spy story. Snowden unlocked the door: here Gellman describes what he found on the other side over the course of a years-long journey of investigation. It is also the story of his own escalating battle against unknown digital adversaries after he discovered his own name on a file in the NSA document trove and realised that he himself was under attack.

Through a gripping narrative of paranoia, clandestine operations and jaw-dropping revelations, Dark Mirror delineates in full for the first time the hidden superstructure that connects government espionage with Silicon Valley and the most powerful corporation whose name you’ve never heard. Who is spying on us and why? Here are the answers.

Becoming

Michelle Obama (Author)

Pre-order: Amazon Waterstones Audible Foyles WHSmith

An intimate, powerful, and inspiring memoir by the former First Lady of the United States

In a life filled with meaning and accomplishment, Michelle Obama has emerged as one of the most iconic and compelling women of our era. As First Lady of the United States of America - the first African-American to serve in that role - she helped create the most welcoming and inclusive White House in history, while also establishing herself as a powerful advocate for women and girls in the U.S. and around the world, dramatically changing the ways that families pursue healthier and more active lives, and standing with her husband as he led America through some of its most harrowing moments. Along the way, she showed us a few dance moves, crushed Carpool Karaoke, and raised two down-to-earth daughters under an unforgiving media glare.

In her memoir, a work of deep reflection and mesmerizing storytelling, Michelle Obama invites readers into her world, chronicling the experiences that have shaped her - from her childhood on the South Side of Chicago to her years as an executive balancing the demands of motherhood and work, to her time spent at the world's most famous address. With unerring honesty and lively wit, she describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both public and private, telling her full story as she has lived it - in her own words and on her own terms. Warm, wise, and revelatory, Becoming is the deeply personal reckoning of a woman of soul and substance who has steadily defied expectations - and whose story inspires us to do the same.

What Love Teaches Me

Ziauddin Yousafzai (Author) , Louise Carpenter (Contributor)

***Guardian pick as one of the biggest and most interesting books of the year ***


The story of the father who inspired the phenomenon

For over twenty years, Ziauddin Yousafsai has been fighting for equality – first for Malala, his daughter – and then for all girls throughout the world living in patriarchal societies. Taught as a young boy in Pakistan to believe that he was inherently better than his sisters, Ziauddin rebelled against inequality at a young age. And when he had a daughter himself he vowed that Malala would have an education, something usually only given to boys, and he founded a school that Malala could attend.

Then in 2012, Malala was shot for standing up to the Taliban by continuing to go to her father's school, and Ziauddin almost lost the very person for whom his fight for equality began.

What Love Teaches Me is Ziauddin’s journey from a stammering boy growing up in a tiny village high in the mountains of Pakistan, through to being an activist for equality and the father of the youngest ever recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, and now one of the most influential and inspiring young women on the planet.

Told through intimate portraits of each of Ziauddin’s closest relationships – as a son to a traditional father; as a father to Malala and her brothers, educated and growing up in the West; as a husband to a wife finally learning to read and write; as a brother to five sisters still living in the patriarchy – What Love Teaches Me looks at what it means to love, to have courage and fight for what is inherently right. Personal in its detail and universal in its themes, this is a landmark book from the man behind the phenomenon, and shows why we must all keep fighting for the rights of girls and women around the world.

Britain's Best Political Cartoons 2018

Tim Benson (Author)

Between Britain’s beleaguered Brexit talks and chaos in Trump’s White House, the FIFA World Cup in Russia and and a long-awaited Royal Wedding, Britain’s political cartoonists’ pens are poised to skewer, celebrate and deride the biggest political events of 2018. In Britain’s Best Political Cartoons, Dr Tim Benson returns with another compendium of the wittiest drawings from our very best political cartoonists, including Steve Bell, Martin Rowson, ‘Mac’, Peter Brookes, and many more. Occasionally thought-provoking, often incisive and always hilarious, it is a riotous tour through another unforgettable twelve months in politics.

Jeeves and the King of Clubs

Ben Schott (Author)

Building on Wodehouse’s incalculable legacy, JEEVES AND THE KING OF CLUBS reimagines Bertie Wooster as a British spy, and the Junior Ganymede – the club for the gentleman’s gentleman - as a branch of the British Secret Service. Full of intrigue, exploits, comedy and wit, Schott and Wodehouse make for a harmonious, hilarious pair.

Miami and the Siege of Chicago

Norman Mailer (Author)

Miami, Summer 1968. The Vietnam War is raging; Martin Luther King, Jr., and Bobby Kennedy have just been assassinated. The Republican Party meets in Miami and picks Richard Nixon as its candidate, to little fanfare. But when the Democrats back Lyndon Johnson's ineffectual vice president, Hubert Humphrey, the city of Chicago erupts. Antiwar protesters fill the streets and the police run amok, beating and arresting demonstrators and delegates alike, all broadcast on live television, and captured in these pages by one of America's fiercest intellects.

The Armies of the Night

Norman Mailer (Author)

October 21, 1967, Washington, D.C. 20,000 to 200,000 protesters are marching to end the war in Vietnam, while helicopters hover overhead and federal marshals and soldiers with fixed bayonets await them on the Pentagon steps. Among the marchers is Norman Mailer. From his own singular participation in the day's events and his even more extraordinary perceptions comes a classic work that shatters the mould of traditional reportage. Intellectuals and hippies, clergymen and cops, poets and army MPs crowd the pages of a book in which facts are fused with techniques of fiction to create the nerve-end reality of experiential truth.

The Armies of the Night uniquely and unforgettably captures the Sixties' tidal wave of love and rage at its crest and a towering genius at his peak.

How To Be Right

James O'Brien (Author)

Caller: ‘It was a big thing voting Brexit. I was willing to take that sacrifice so we control our own laws.’
James O’Brien: ‘So I'm just wondering what those laws are that you won't have to obey any more, that made you vote for this economic hit. Can you name one?
Caller: ‘I wouldn't be able to, no.

James O’Brien has made a career of listening to people phoning in to his daily show on LBC to point the blame at benefits scroungers, the EU, Muslims, feminists and immigrants. But what makes James’s show such essential listening – and has made James a standout social media star – is the careful way he punctures their assumptions and dismantles their arguments live on air, every single morning.

In How to be Right, James provides a hilarious and invigorating guide to talking to people with faulty opinions. With chapters on every lightning-rod issue in current affairs, James tells the stories of the conversations he’s had, explains why people have been fooled into thinking the way they do, and in each case outlines the key questions to ask to reveal fallacies, inconsistencies and double standards.

If you ever encounter ardent Brexiteers, Daily Mail readers or little England patriots, this book is your conversation survival guide. Forget agreeing to disagree – it’s time to learn how to be right.

‘I have had a ringside seat as a significant swathe of the British population was sold an enormous dose of industrial strength snake oil. I watched them being persuaded that their failures were the fault of foreigners, that their lack of funds was caused by people with even less than them and that their whole lives were somehow somebody else’s fault. I listened to them explain how unisex lavatories threatened their peace of mind and heard them insist that ‘all Muslims’ must somehow apologise for terror attacks undertaken by extremists. I tried to dissuade them and sometimes succeeded… The challenge is to do it in a way that distinguishes sharply between the people who told lies and the people whose only offence was to believe them.’
– James O’Brien

Whiteshift

Eric Kaufmann (Author)

Across the West, anti-immigration populists are tearing a path through the usual politics of left and right. Immigration is remaking Europe and North America: over half of American babies are non-white, and by the end of the century, minorities and those of mixed race are projected to form the majority in many countries.

Drawing on an extraordinary range of surveys, Whiteshift explores the majority response to ethnic change in Western Europe, North America and Australasia. Eric Kaufmann, a leading expert on immigration, calls for us to move beyond empty talk about national identity and open up debate about the future of white majorities. He argues that we must ditch the 'diversity myth' that whites will dwindle, replacing it with whiteshift - a new story of majority transformation that can help lift anxieties and heal today's widening political divisions.

A bold, original work, Whiteshift will redefine the way we think about ethnic diversity and populism.

Leaders

Stanley McChrystal (Author) , Jeff Eggers (Author) , Jason Mangone (Author)

The bestselling author of Team of Teams dismantles the Great Man theory of leadership, by profiling leaders whose real stories defy their legends.

Retired four-star general Stan McChrystal has studied leadership his whole adult life, from his first day at West Point to his most recent work with the corporate clients of the McChrystal Group. In this follow-up to his bestsellers My Share of the Task and Team of Teams, McChrystal explores what leadership really means, debunking the many myths that have surrounded the concept. He focuses on thirteen great leaders, showing that the lessons we commonly draw from their lives are seldom the correct ones.

These include:

Founders: Walt Disney built his empire thinking he was a man of the people, but was actually a bit of a tyrant to the working man. Coco Chanel hid her humble background to pretend she was an aristocrat, but was obsessed with making clothes for the common people.

Zealots: Maximilien Robespierre whipped his revolutionaries into a frenzy through his writing, while Abu Musab Zarkawi moved on the front lines of the battlefield, winning over his followers through his personal charisma.

Powerbrokers: Margaret Thatcher and Boss Tweed, whose respective reigns depended on the networks they cultivated.

Other leaders profiled include geniuses Albert Einstein and Leonard Bernstein, reformers Martin Luther and Martin Luther King, Jr., and heroes Harriet Tubman and Zheng He.

Ultimately, McChrystal posits that different environments will require different leaders, and that followers will choose the leader they need. Aspiring leaders will be best served not by cultivating a standard set of textbook leadership qualities, but by learning to discern what is required in each situation.

The Infinite Game

Simon Sinek (Author)

The New York Times-bestselling author of Start With Why, Leaders Eat Last, and Together Is Better offers a bold new approach to business strategy by asking one question: are you playing the finite game or the infinite game?

In The Infinite Game, Sinek applies game theory to explore how great businesses achieve long-lasting success. He finds that building long-term value and healthy, enduring growth - that playing the infinite game - is the only thing that matters to your business.

National Populism

Roger Eatwell (Author) , Matthew Goodwin (Author)

A crucial new guide to one of the most important and most dangerous phenomena of our time: the rise of populism in the West

Across the West, there is a rising tide of people who feel excluded, alienated from mainstream politics, and increasingly hostile towards minorities, immigrants and neo-liberal economics. Many of these voters are turning to national populist movements, which pose the most serious threat to the Western liberal democratic system, and its values, since the Second World War. From the United States to France, Austria to the UK, the national populist challenge to mainstream politics is all around us.

But what is behind this exclusionary turn? Who supports these movements and why? What does their rise tell us about the health of liberal democratic politics in the West? And what, if anything, should we do to respond to these challenges?

Written by two of the foremost experts on fascism and the rise of the populist right, National Populism is a lucid and deeply-researched guide to the radical transformations of today's political landscape, revealing why liberal democracies across the West are being challenged-and what those who support them can do to help stem the tide.

Eve Was Shamed

Helena Kennedy (Author)

What comes after #MeToo? One of our most eminent lawyers and defenders of human rights answers with with this urgent, authoritative and deeply shocking look at British justice

In Eve Was Shamed Helena Kennedy forensically examines the pressing new evidence that women are being routinely discriminated against when it comes to the law. From the demure way women must present themselves in court to the lack of female judges; the treatment of rape victims to battered wives being asked why they don’t ‘just leave’ their partners; the complexities of FGM and other honour crimes to the 'lifestyle' choices of the Rotherham girls; the way statistics hide the double discrimination experienced by BAME women to the scandal of female prisons. She reserves particular concern for the effects of the internet, from the influence of pornography to the use of social media as evidence.

The law holds up a mirror to society and it is failing women. The #MeToo movement has been in part a reaction to those failures. So what comes next? How do we codify what we've learned? In this richly detailed and shocking book, one of our most eminent human rights thinkers and practitioners shows with force and fury that change for women must start at the heart of what makes society just.

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