918 results 1-20

Be More Pirate

Sam Conniff Allende (Author)

Have you ever wanted to make your mark on the world and wondered how?
Have you ever wanted to stand up to the system, break it, or make it better?
Have you ever wondered how to find success amidst unpredictability ?

The answer? Be More Pirate.

In Be More Pirate, award-winning social entrepreneur Sam Conniff Allende reveals how the game-changing innovations, strategies and purpose of pirates can provide a blueprint for anyone embarking on their own personal adventure.

From creating the world's most iconic brand 150 years before Coca-Cola to championing free trade and fair pay, pirates were the true pioneers of their day. Drawing on the original eighteenth century pirate code and looking to 'modern day pirates' like Banksy, Elon Musk and Malala for inspiration, Conniff Allende reveals how to stand up to the status quo and create a personal manifesto that will ensure you find success in uncertain times.

Whatever your ideas or the scale of your ambitions, Be More Pirate will revolutionise the way you think, work and live.

Sam Conniff Allende is the founder and former CEO of Livity, a multi-award-winning youth marketing agency. Conniff Allende has led the unlikeliest collaborations between brands and bright young people on the edges of society, resulting in real innovation. He has worked with Google, Unilever, PlayStation and Dyson, and regularly speaks at these industry-leading companies.

Dark Mirror

Barton Gellman (Author)

Barton Gellman’s informant called himself ‘Verax’ – the truth-teller. It was only later that Verax unmasked himself as Edward Snowden. By that point he had already shared thousands of files with Gellman.

Dark Mirror is the ultimate inside account of the vast, global surveillance network that now pervades all our lives. Gellman’s primary role in bringing Snowden’s revelations to light, for which he shared the Pulitzer prize, is only the beginning of this gripping real-life spy story. Snowden unlocked the door: here Gellman describes what he found on the other side over the course of a years-long journey of investigation. It is also the story of his own escalating battle against unknown digital adversaries after he discovered his own name on a file in the NSA document trove and realised that he himself was under attack.

Through a gripping narrative of paranoia, clandestine operations and jaw-dropping revelations, Dark Mirror delineates in full for the first time the hidden superstructure that connects government espionage with Silicon Valley and the most powerful corporation whose name you’ve never heard. Who is spying on us and why? Here are the answers.

On the Edge

Richard Davies (Author)

To understand how humans react and adapt to change we need to study people who live in harsh environments. From the death-row prisoners trading in prisons where money is banned to the stateless ethnic Russians shut out of Estonia’s hyper-modern economy, every life in this book has been hit by a seismic shock, violently broken or damaged in some way.
People living in these odd and marginal places are ignored by number crunching economists and political pollsters alike. Science suggests this is a mistake.
This book tells the personal stories of humans living in extreme situations. 'Extreme' does not mean the familiar stock market crashes, housing crises, or banking scandals of the financial pages. The book takes the reader to really odd places, the places that no-one visits. Places where part of the economy has been repressed, removed, destroyed or turbocharged. By travelling to each of them and discovering what life is really like, On the Edge tells small stories that shed light on today’s biggest economic questions.

The Finance Curse

Nicholas Shaxson (Author)

We need finance – but when finance grows too big it becomes a curse. Far from being the geese that lay the golden eggs, Wall Street and the City of London have become cuckoos in the nest.

The City of London is the single biggest drain on our resources; it sucks talent out of every sphere, it siphons off wealth, hoovers up government time, inflates prices and, as we’ve all seen, leads to boom and bust.

Yet to be ‘competitive’, we must deregulate, bust the unions, and turn a blind eye to money-laundering to appease big business. We are told this is about wealth creation; the reality is wealth extraction.

Nicholas Shaxson revealed the dark heart of tax havens long before the Panama and Paradise Papers. Here, he issues a new warning, telling the astonishing story of how finance established a stranglehold on society. How were tax havens born? Why did Swiss banks first become secret? What’s competitive about allowing big companies like Apple and Amazon to avoid paying tax?

An essential guide and an explosive new tool, The Finance Curse shows how we got where we are and how we can dismantle a suffocating system.

Dominion

Paul Lussier (Author)

A landmark account of the race to save the planet, by one of the world’s foremost experts on climate science

At the current rate of carbon pollution, we are we are likely to see the first wave of global catastrophes as a result of CO2 levels within the next twenty to twenty-five years. As a result, a group of scientists from around the world, backed by billionaires, oligarchs and dictators, are attempting to find other, more drastic solutions. The science of manipulating the earth’s climate (and nature itself) is known as ‘geoengineering’, and is looked to, by many, as the only way to save our planet. Current schemes include the creation of artificial sulphate clouds to cool the temperatures of regions; the dispersal of millions of tons of seawater into the atmosphere via aeroplane; and the sending of thousands of light-reflecting mirrors into space. All would, scientists claim, immediately lower the earth’s temperature, and slow (or stop) our current trajectory. But each also presents incalculable and possibly catastrophic risks.

Dominion is the first exploration of the race to save the planet – providing an authoritative examination of the history, science and mechanics of the various geoengineering schemes, their possible implications, and the extraordinary cast of characters – scientists, entrepreneurs, despots, ecologists, politicians – involved. It also points to what might save us from destruction: a new era of cooperation, and possibly the next stage in our evolution as a species.

Instructive, explosive and more urgent now than ever before, Dominion is an essential guide to our present and future, from one of the great scientific minds and communicators of this century.

Body Politic

William Davies (Author)

In this age of emotional political conflict, there is less and less to agree upon. Experts are no longer respected as impartial; public debate is reduced to attack and counter-attack; the boundary between facts and propaganda seems to be dissolving. We live in a world not quite at war but nor exactly at peace.

How did things reach this point, and what can we do about it? In this enlightening, far-reaching and provocative book, William Davies takes a step back to explore the long history of the rise and fall of expertise. He shows how science and government once promised an alternative to violence, but how that promise was gradually broken. Rather than a world organised around facts, rationality and theory, we now find ourselves, once again, in world driven by physical instincts, ailments and pains.

In order to navigate this disorientating new reality we need to understand it for what it is: a politics of bodies.

21 Lessons for the 21st Century

Yuval Noah Harari (Author)

**FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE MILLION-COPY BESTSELLER SAPIENS**

Sapiens showed us where we came from. Homo Deus looked to the future. 21 Lessons for the 21st Century explores the present.

How can we protect ourselves from nuclear war, ecological cataclysms and technological disruptions? What can we do about the epidemic of fake news or the threat of terrorism? What should we teach our children?

Yuval Noah Harari takes us on a thrilling journey through today’s most urgent issues. The golden thread running through his exhilarating new book is the challenge of maintaining our collective and individual focus in the face of constant and disorienting change. Are we still capable of understanding the world we have created?

The Death of the Gods

Carl Miller (Author)

A groundbreaking examination of the new centres of power and control in the twenty-first century

A new force is chipping away at the old, familiar places where power used to sit: jolting economies, transforming political parties, swallowing newspapers, eclipsing experts, dismantling corporations. But as it rips down traditional seats of power, it is at the same time redistributing that power to new, mysterious places, in new, mysterious ways.

In The Death of the Gods, Carl Miller takes us on a journey to expose the centres of control today, and how the new power is shaping our world. Moving through several realms – work, politics, business, culture, media and crime – The Death of the Gods draws on pioneering research and analysis to describe how power is created, applied and sustained in the twenty-first century, and attempts to define what power really means today.

A new world order has emerged. Astounding new opportunities – as broadcaster, politician, entrepreneur or activist – are at our fingertips. But how available is power today? Do we have more power than ever before, or are we more controlled than ever before?

Crucible

Charles Emmerson (Author)

What comes first: the character of the times, or the characters who give it theirs?

Crucible charts the trajectories of the characters who fell from power in the bloody breakdown of Europe’s old order between 1917 and 1924, and those who for whom the restless chaos marked the beginning of an unlikely rise to fame.

Year by year, we follow Kaiser Wilhelm into his wood-chopping Dutch exile, and Lenin from his Swiss library-desk to his muddled end as an invalid in revolutionary Russia gone stale. Ernest Hemingway criss-crosses the Atlantic in search of himself: soldier, hack journalist, writer, fisherman. Surrealism is born in a Paris attic. Europe suffers a nervous collapse, alternating between revolution and reaction. America takes fright. A Viennese doctor of eclectic tastes becomes an intellectual celebrity. An Austrian ex-soldier touts himself as the tribune of the German people.

Outside the classic frames of war and peace, these all-too-human tales – funny, tragic and fateful – tell a wider story of the exuberant dreams, dark fears, grubby ambition and sheer chance which marked Europe’s post-war metamorphosis, and the century to come.

Gandhi 1915-1948

Ramachandra Guha (Author)

Gandhi lived one of the great 20th century lives. He inspired and enraged, challenged and delighted many million men and women around the world. He lived almost entirely in the shadow of the British Raj, which for much of his life seemed a permanent fact, but which he did more than anyone else to destroy, using revolutionary and inspirational tactics. In a world defined by violence on a scale never imagined before and by ferocious Fascist and Communist dictatorship, he was armed with nothing more than his arguments and example.

This magnificent book tells the story of Gandhi's life, from his departure from South Africa to his assassination in 1948. It is a book with a Tolstoyan sweep, both allowing us to see Gandhi as he was understood by his contemporaries and the vast, unbelievably varied Indian societies and landscapes which he travelled through and changed beyond measure. Drawing on many new sources and animated by its author's wonderful sense of drama and politics, the publication of Gandhi is a major event.

The Art of Gathering

Priya Parker (Author)

We spend our lives gathering - first in classrooms and then in meetings, weddings, conferences and away days. Yet so many of us spend this time in underwhelming moments that fail to engage us, inspire us, or connect us. We've all sat in meetings where people talk past each other or go through the motions and others that galvanise a team and remind everyone why they first took the job. We've been to weddings that were deeply moving and others that were run-of-the-mill and simply faded away.

Why do some moments take off and others fizzle? What's the difference between the gatherings that inspire you and the ones that don't?

In The Art of Gathering, Priya Parker gets to the heart of these questions and reveals how to design a transformative gathering. An expert on organising successful gatherings whether in conference centres or her living room, Parker shows us how to create moving, magical, mind-changing experiences - even in spaces where we've come to expect little.

Terrorist Hunter

Tamer Elnoury (Author)

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER
The gripping true story of the undercover agent risking his life to fight terrorism

Their aim was to kill as many people as possible.
His mission was to stop them.

A terrorist plot to kill hundreds of innocent people.
An undercover agent posing as a wealthy Al-Qaeda sympathiser.
A race against time to gain the terrorists’ trust and bring them down. Before it’s too late…
In the aftermath of 9/11, long-time undercover FBI agent Tamer Elnoury joined an elite counterterrorism unit. Its mission: to infiltrate terror cells, gain detailed knowledge of their networks and bring them successfully to justice. Writing under a pseudonym, Tamer Elnoury here tells the hair-raising true story of life undercover, risking his life to keep us safe.

Give People Money

Annie Lowrey (Author)

Surely just giving people money couldn't work. Or could it?

Imagine if every month the government deposited £1000 in your bank account, with no strings attached and nothing expected in return. It sounds crazy, but Universal Basic Income (UBI) has become one of the most influential policy ideas of our time, backed by thinkers on both the left and the right. The founder of Facebook, Obama's chief economist, governments from Canada to Finland are all seriously debating some form of UBI.

In this sparkling and provocative book, economics writer Annie Lowrey looks at the global UBI movement. She travels to Kenya to see how UBI is lifting the poorest people on earth out of destitution, India to see how inefficient government programs are failing the poor, South Korea to interrogate UBI’s intellectual pedigree, and Silicon Valley to meet the tech titans financing UBI pilots in expectation of a world with advanced artificial intelligence and little need for human labour. She also examines at the challenges the movement faces: contradictory aims, uncomfortable costs, and most powerfully, the entrenched belief that no one should get something for nothing.

The UBI movement is not just an economic policy -- it also calls into question our deepest intuitions about what we owe each other and what activities we should reward and value as a society.

Damaged Goods

Oliver Shah (Author)

In March 2015, British businessman and the chairman of Arcadia Group Sir Philip Green sold BHS for £1 to Retail Acquisitions, owned by Dominic Chappell, a serial bankrupt who filed BHS for administration shortly after. By April 2016, BHS had debts of £1.3bn, including a pensions deficit of £571m.

Damaged Goods follows Green's journey to the big time, the sale of BHS and the subsequent investigation that concluded with Green paying £363m to the Pensions Regulator.

In Damaged Goods, Oliver Shah, the award-winning journalist who first broke the story, shines a light on Green's past and Arcadia's uncertain future; this is the extraordinary account of the retail magnate Sir Philip Green's life and his relationship with the high street.

Oliver Shah is the award-winning City Editor of The Sunday Times and one of the most respected national commentators on business and the high street. He was named business journalist of the year at the 2017 Press Awards for his investigation into Sir Philip Green and was named business journalist of the year at the 2017 London Press Club Awards. Shah has been interviewed on Radio Four's Today Programme, BBC News, BBC Five Live and Sky News.

The World As It Is

Ben Rhodes (Author)

This is a book about two men making the most important decisions in the world. One is Barack Obama. The other is Ben Rhodes.

The World As It Is tells the full story of what it means to work alongside a radical leader; of how idealism can confront reality and survive; of how the White House really functions; and of what it is to have a partnership, and ultimately a friendship, with a historic president.

A young writer and Washington outsider, Rhodes was plucked from obscurity aged 29. Chosen for his original perspective and gift with language, his role was to help shape the nation’s hopes and sense of itself. For nearly ten years, Ben Rhodes was at the centre of the Obama Administration – first as a speechwriter, then a policymaker, and finally a multi-purpose aide and close collaborator.

Rhodes puts us in the room at the most tense and poignant moments in recent history: starting every morning with Obama in the Daily Briefing; waiting out the bin Laden raid in the Situation Room; reaching a nuclear agreement with Iran; leading secret negotiations with the Cuban government; confronting the resurgence of nationalism that led to the election of Donald Trump.

This is the most vivid portrayal yet of Obama’s presidency. It is an essential record of the last decade. But it also shows us what it means to hold the pen, and to write the words that change our world.

A Certain Idea of France

Julian Jackson (Author)

The definitive biography of the greatest French statesman of modern times

In six weeks in the early summer of 1940, France was over-run by German troops and quickly surrendered. The French government of Marshal Pétain sued for peace and signed an armistice. One little-known junior French general, refusing to accept defeat, made his way to England. On 18 June he spoke to his compatriots over the BBC, urging them to rally to him in London. 'Whatever happens, the flame of French resistance must not be extinguished and will not be extinguished.' At that moment, Charles de Gaulle entered into history.

For the rest of the war, de Gaulle frequently bit the hand that fed him. He insisted on being treated as the true embodiment of France, and quarrelled violently with Churchill and Roosevelt. He was prickly, stubborn, aloof and self-contained. But through sheer force of personality and bloody-mindedness he managed to have France recognised as one of the victorious Allies, occupying its own zone in defeated Germany. For ten years after 1958 he was President of France's Fifth Republic, which he created and which endures to this day. His pursuit of 'a certain idea of France' challenged American hegemony, took France out of NATO and twice vetoed British entry into the European Community. His controversial decolonization of Algeria brought France to the brink of civil war and provoked several assassination attempts.

Julian Jackson's magnificent biography reveals this the life of this titanic figure as never before. It draws on a vast range of published and unpublished memoirs and documents - including the recently opened de Gaulle archives - to show how de Gaulle achieved so much during the War when his resources were so astonishingly few, and how, as President, he put a medium-rank power at the centre of world affairs. No previous biography has depicted his paradoxes so vividly. Much of French politics since his death has been about his legacy, and he remains by far the greatest French leader since Napoleon.

The Inner Level

Richard Wilkinson (Author) , Kate Pickett (Author)

Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett's The Spirit Level, now published in more than twenty languages, has been one of the most influential non-fiction books published in the last decade, showing conclusively how less equal societies fare worse than more equal ones across a whole range of social measures - health, education, levels of violence, life expectancy and child wellbeing - and initiating the enormous public attention now given to the impacts of inequality.

Based on an equally impressive range of data and analysis, The Inner Level now shows the impact inequality has on individuals: how it affects us psychologically, makes social relations more stressful, undermines self-confidence and distorts natural differences in personal abilities. It demonstrates that societies based on fundamental equalities, sharing and reciprocity produce much higher levels of wellbeing than those based on excessive individualism, competitiveness and social aggression. Like its predecessor, The Inner Level will transform ideas of how we should organise the way we live together.

The Peterloo Massacre

Joyce Marlow (Author)

Unity of the oppressed can make a difference in politically uncertain times

A peaceful protest turned tragedy; this is the true story of the working class fight for the vote.

On August 16 1819, in St Peter’s Field, Manchester, a large non-violent gathering demanding parliamentary reform turned into a massacre, leaving many dead and hundreds more injured.

This catastrophic event was one of the key moments of the age, a political awakening of the working class, and eventually led to ordinary people gaining suffrage. In this definitive account Joyce Marlow tells the stories of the real people involved and brings to life the atrocity the government attempted to cover up.

The Peterloo Massacre is soon to be the subject of a major film directed by Mike Leigh.

Tyrant

Stephen Greenblatt (Author)

How does a truly disastrous leader – a sociopath, a demagogue, a tyrant – come to power?
How, and why, does a tyrant hold on to power?
And what goes on in the hidden recesses of the tyrant's soul?

For help in understanding our most urgent contemporary dilemmas, William Shakespeare has no peer.

As an ageing, tenacious Elizabeth I clung to power, a talented playwright probed the social and psychological roots and the twisted consequences of tyranny. What he discovered in his characters remains remarkably relevant today. With uncanny insight, he shone a spotlight on the infantile psychology and unquenchable narcissistic appetites of demagogues and imagined how they might be stopped.

In Tyrant, Stephen Greenblatt examines the themes of power and tyranny in some of Shakespeare’s most famous plays -- from the dominating figures of Richard III, Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Macbeth, and Coriolanus to the subtle tyranny found in Measure for Measure and The Winter's Tale.

Tyrant is a highly relevant exploration of Shakespeare’s work that sheds new light on the workings of power.

From Cold War to Hot Peace

Michael McFaul (Author)

In 2008, when Michael McFaul was asked to leave his perch at Stanford and join an unlikely presidential campaign, he had no idea that he would find himself at the beating heart of one of today's most contentious and consequential international relationships. As President Barack Obama's adviser on Russian affairs, McFaul helped craft the United States' policy known as "reset" that fostered new and unprecedented collaboration between the two countries. And then, as U.S. ambassador to Russia from 2012 to 2014, he had a front-row seat when this fleeting, hopeful moment crumbled with Vladimir Putin's return to the presidency.

This riveting inside account combines history and memoir to tell the full story of U.S.-Russia relations from the fall of the Soviet Union to the new rise of the hostile, paranoid Russian president. From the first days of McFaul's ambassadorship, the Kremlin actively sought to discredit and undermine him, hassling him with tactics that included dispatching protesters to his front gates, slandering him on state media, and tightly surveilling him, his staff, and his family.

From Cold War to Hot Peace is an essential account of the most consequential global confrontation of our time.

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