168 results 1-20

Young Men in Spats

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

Meet the Young Men in Spats - all members of the Drones Club, all crossed in love and all busy betting their sometimes nonexistent fortunes on unlikely outcomes - that's when they're not recovering from driving their sports cars through rather than round Marble Arch.

These wonderful comic short stories are the essence of innocent fun. In them you'll encounter some of Wodehouse's favourite characters - including, for the first time, his future hero Uncle Fred. The collection is widely regarded as one of Wodehouse's best and includes one of his own favourites, 'The Amazing Hat Mystery'.

The Adventures of Sally

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A P.G Wodehouse novel

If you come into a lot of money, life becomes easier, right?

No, wrong - at least for Sally Nicholas, whose generosity of spirit immediately runs into all the slings and arrows outrageous fortune can send. Her handsome fiance turns out not to be all he seems - and then there is the show he's written, which Sally puts on in the theatre. No, in this delightful early novel from the master of Englsih comedy, life is not straightforward at all.

But waiting in the wings is Ginger Kemp, who really does adore her, seems to make a hash of everything he tries and yet is always ready to try something else. If money becomes a problem, perhaps Ginger will provide a solution.

Wonderful Wodehouse 1: A Collection

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

The Inimitable Jeeves
A classic collection of stories featuring some of the funniest episodes in the life of Bertie Wooster, gentleman, and Jeeves, his gentleman's gentleman - in which Bertie's terrifying Aunt Agatha stalks the pages, seeking whom she may devour, while Bertie's friend Bingo Little falls in love with seven different girls in succession (including the bestselling romantic novelist Rosie M. Banks). And Bertie, with Jeeves's help, hopes to evade the clutches of the terrifying Honoria Glossop. At its heart is one of Wodehouse's most delicious stories, 'The Great Sermon Handicap'.

Carry On, Jeeves
These marvellous stories introduce us to Jeeves, whose first ever duty is to cure Bertie's raging hangover ('If you would drink this, sir... it is a little preparation of my own invention. It is the Worcester Sauce that gives it its colour. The raw egg makes it nutritious. The red pepper gives it its bite. Gentlemen have told me they have found it extremely invigorating after a late evening.')

And from that moment, one of the funniest, sharpest and most touching partnerships in English literature never looks back...

Very Good, Jeeves:
An outstanding collection of Jeeves stories, every one a winner, in which Jeeves endeavours to give satisfaction:

By saving a grumpy cabinet minister from being marooned and attacked by a swan - in the process saving Bertie Wooster from his impending doom...

By rescuing Bingo Little and Tuppy Glossop from the soup (twice each)...

By arranging rather too many performances of the song 'Sonny Boy' to a not very appreciative audience...

And by a variety of other sparkling stratagems that should reduce you to helpless laughter.

Wonderful Wodehouse 2: A Collection

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

Thank You, Jeeves
Thank You, Jeeves is the first novel to feature the incomparable valet Jeeves and his hapless charge Bertie Wooster - and you've hardly started to turn the pages when he resigns over Bertie's dedicated but somewhat untuneful playing of the banjo. In high dudgeon, Bertie disappears to the country as a guest of his chum Chuffy - only to find his peace shattered by the arrival of his ex-fiancée Pauline Stoker, her formidable father and the eminent loony-doctor Sir Roderick Glossop. When Chuffy falls in love with Pauline and Bertie seems to be caught in flagrante, a situation boils up which only Jeeves (whether employed or not) can simmer down...

Right-Ho, Jeeves
Gussie Fink-Nottle's knowledge of the common newt is unparalleled. Drop him in a pond of newts and his behaviour will be exemplary, but introduce him to a girl and watch him turn pink, yammer, and suddenly stampede for great open spaces. Even with Madeline Bassett, who feels that the stars are God's daisy chain, his tongue is tied in reef-knots. And his chum Tuppy Glossop isn't getting on much better with Madeline's delectable friend Angela.

With so many broken hearts lying about him, Bertie Wooster can't sit idly by. The happiness of a pal - two pals, in fact - is at stake. But somehow Bertie's best-laid plans land everyone in the soup, and so it's just as well that Jeeves is ever at hand to apply his bulging brains to the problems of young love.

The Code of the Woosters
When Bertie Wooster goes to Totleigh Towers to pour oil on the troubled waters of a lovers' breach between Madeline Bassett and Gussie Fink-Nottle, he isn't expecting to see Aunt Dahlia there - nor to be instructed by her to steal some silver. But purloining the antique cow creamer from under the baleful nose of Sir Watkyn Bassett is the least of Bertie's tasks. He has to restore true love to both Madeline and Gussie and to the Revd Stinker Pinker and Stiffy Byng - and confound the insane ambitions of would-be Dictator Roderick Spode and his Black Shorts. It's a situation that only Jeeves can unravel...

Ukridge

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A P.G. Wodehouse collection

Money makes the world go round for Stanley Featherstonehaugh Ukridge - and when there isn't enough of it, the world just has to spin a bit faster.

Ever on the lookout for a quick buck, a solid gold fortune, or at least a plausible little scrounge, the irrepressible Ukridge gives con men a bad name. Looking like an animated blob of mustard in his bright yellow raincoat, he invests time, passion and energy (but seldom actual cash) in a series of increasingly bizarre money-making schemes. Finance for a dog college? It's yours. Shares in an accident syndicate? Easily arranged. Promoting a kind-hearted heavyweight boxer? A snip.

Poor Corky Corcoran, Ukridge's old school chum and confidant, trails through these pages in the ebullient wake of Wodehouse's most disreputable but endearing hero and hopes to escape with his shirt at least.

Uncle Dynamite

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

The uncle in question is Frederick Altamount Cornwallis, Fifth Earl of Ickenham, better known as Uncle Fred, an old boy of such a sunny and youthful nature that explosions of sweetness and light detonate all around him (in the course, it must be said, of a plot that involves blackmail, impersonation, knock-out drops, stealing, arrests and potential jewel-smuggling).

This is Wodehouse at his very best, with sundered lovers, explorers, broke publishers and irascible aristocrats all eventually yielding to the magic, ever-so-slightly-unscrupulous touch of Uncle Fred. It is, as Richard Usborne writes, 'a brilliantly sustained rattle of word-perfect dialogue and narrative topping a very complicated and well-controlled plot'.

Laughing Gas

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A P.G. Wodehouse novel

Joey Cooley is a golden-curled child film star, the idol of American motherhood. Reginald, Third Earl of Havershot, is a boxing blue on a mission to save his wayward cousin from the fleshpots of Hollywood. Both are under anaesthetic at the dentists when something strange happens - and their identities are swapped in the ether.

Suddenly Joey can use his six-foot frame to get his own back on his Hollywood persecutors. But Reggie has to endure everything Joey had to put up with in the horrible life of a child star - including kidnap.

Laughing Gas is Wodehouse's brilliantly funny take on the 'If I were you' theme - a wry look at the dangers of getting what you wish for in the movie business and beyond.

Meet Mr Mulliner

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A Mulliner collection

In the Angler's Rest, drinking hot scotch and lemon, sits one of Wodehouse's greatest raconteurs. Mr Mulliner, his vivid imagination lubricated by Miss Postlethwaite the barmaid, has fabulous stories to tell of the extraordinary behaviour of his far-flung family: in particular there's Wilfred, inventor of Raven Gypsy face-cream and Snow of the Mountain Lotion, who lights on the formula for Buck-U-Uppo, a tonic given to elephants to enable them to face tigers with the necessary nonchalance. Its explosive effects on a shy young curate and then the higher clergy is gravely revealed. Then there's his cousin James, the detective-story writer, who has inherited a cottage more haunted than anything in his own imagination. And Isadore Zinzinheimer, head of the Bigger, Better & Brighter Motion Picture Company. Tall tales all - but among Wodehouse's best.

Piccadilly Jim

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

It takes a lot of effort for Jimmy Crocker to become Piccadilly Jim - nights on the town roistering, headlines in the gossip columns, a string of broken hearts and breaches of promise. Eventually he bacomes rather good at it and manages to go to pieces with his eyes open.

But no sooner has Jimmy cut wild swathe through fashionable London than his terrifying Aunt Nesta decides he must mend his ways. He then falls in love with the girl he has hurt most of all, and after that things get complicated.

In a dizzying plot, impersonations pile on impersonations so that (for reasons that will become clear, we promise) Jimmy ends up having to pretend he's himself. Piccadilly Jim is one of P.G. Wodehouse's most renowned early comic novels, and has been filmed three times.

The Clicking of Cuthbert

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A Golf collection

The Oldest Member knows everything that has ever happened on the golf course - and a great deal more besides.

Take the story of Cuthbert, for instance. He's helplessly in love with Adeline, but what use are his holes in one when she's in thrall to Culture and prefers rising young writers to winners of the French Open? But enter a Great Russian Novelist with a strange passion, and Cuthbert's prospects are transformed. Then look at what happens to young Mitchell Holmes, who misses short putts because of the uproar of the butterflies in the adjoining meadows. His career seems on the skids - but can golf redeem it?

In this collection, the kindly but shrewd gaze of the Oldest Member picks out some of the funniest stories Wodehouse ever wrote.

The Girl in Blue

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A P.G. Wodehouse novel

Young Jerry West has a few problems. His uncle Crispin is broke and employs a butler who isn't all he seems. His other uncle Willoughby is rich but won't hand over any of his inheritance. And to cap it all, although already engaged, Jerry has just fallen in love with the wonderful Jane Hunnicutt, whom he's just met on jury service. But she's an heiress, and that's a problem too - because even if he can extricate himself from his grasping fiancée Jerry can't be a gold-digger.

Enter The Girl in Blue - a Gainsborough miniature which someone has stolen from Uncle Willoughby. Jerry sets out on a mission to find her - and somehow hilariously in the process everything comes right.

The Heart of a Goof

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A Golf collection

From his favourite chair on the terrace above the ninth hole, The Oldest Member tells a series of hilarious golfing stories. From Evangeline, Bradbury Fisher's fifth wife and a notorious 'golfing giggler', to poor Rollo Podmarsh whose game was so unquestionably inept that 'he began to lose his appetite and would moan feebly at the sight of a poached egg', the game of golf, its players and their friends and enemies are here shown in all their comic glory. One of Wodehouse's funniest books, The Heart of Goof is a collection of peerlessly comic short stories.

Big Money

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A P.G. Wodehouse novel

Most of the big money belongs to Torquil Paterson Frisby, the dyspeptic American millionaire - but that doesn't stop him wanting more out of it. His niece, the beautiful Ann Moon, is engaged to 'Biscuit', Lord Biskerton, who doesn't have very much of the stuff and so he has to escape to Valley Fields to hide from his creditors. Meanwhile, his old schoolfriend Berry Conway, who is working for Frisby, himself falls for Ann - just as Biscuit falls for her friend Kitchie Valentine. In this typically hilarious novel by the master of light comedy, life can sometimes become a little complicated.

Oh, and Berry has been left a lot of shares in the Dream Come True copper mine. Of course they're worthless... aren't they?

Mr Mulliner Speaking

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A Mulliner collection

In the bar-parlour of the Angler's Rest, Mr Mulliner tells his amazing tales, which hold his audience of drinkers (referred to only as Pints of Stout and Whiskies-and-Splash) in the palm of his expressive hand. Here you can discover what happened to The Man Who Gave Up Smoking, share a frisson when the butler delivers Something Squishy on a silver salver ('Your serpent, Sir,' said the voice of Simmons) ­- and experience the dreadful Unpleasantness at Bludleigh Court. Throughout the Mulliner clan remains resourcefully in command in the most outlandish situations, making for a vintage collection of hilarious Wodehouse.

Cocktail Time

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

An Uncle Fred novel

Frederick, Earl of Ickenham, remains young at heart. So it is for him the act of a moment to lean out of the Drones Club window with a catapult and ping the silk top-hat off his grumpy in-law, the distinguished barrister Sir Raymond Bastable - but unfortunately things don't end there.

The sprightly earl finds that his action has inspired a scandalous bestseller and a film script - but this is as nothing compared with the entangled fates of the couples that surround him. In this delightful novel by the master of comic fiction, Uncle Fred will discover that only he, with his fabled sweetness and light can save the day.

A Damsel in Distress

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

A P.G. Wodehouse novel

Lady Maud, the spirited young daughter of the Earl of Marshmoreton, is confined to her home, Belpher Castle in Hampshire, under aunt's orders because of an unfortunate infatuation. Enter our hero, George Bevan, an American who writes songs for musicals and is so smitten with Maud that he descends on Hampshire's rolling acres to see off his rival and claim her heart. Meanwhile, in the great Wodehousian tradition, the Earl of Marshmoreton just wants a quiet life pottering in his garden, supported by his portly butler Keggs and free from the demands of his bossy sister and his silly-ass son.

It is a sunny story which involves misunderstandings, butlers and gentle hearts torn asunder only to be reunited at last. This delightful novel which was twice filmed (once as a musical starring Fred Astaire) has all the wit and lightness of touch that we expect from the great comic writer.

Wodehouse At The Wicket

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

From his early days Wodehouse adored cricket and references to the game run like a golden thread though his writings. He not only wrote about this glorious British pastime, but also played it well, appearing six times at Lords, where his first captain was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Illustrated with wonderful drawings and contemporary score-sheets, Wodehouse at the Wicket is the first ever compendium of Wodehouse's writings on cricket. Edited by cricket historian Murray Hedgcock, this delightful book also contains fascinating facts about Wodehouse's cricketing career and how it is reflected in his work.

This is the perfect gift for Wodehouse readers and fans of all things cricket.

Blandings: Pig-Hoo-o-o-o-ey!

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

EPISODE 1 IN A MAJOR BBC DRAMA STARRING TIMOTHY SPALL, DAVID WALLIAMS AND JENNIFER SAUNDERS

Clarence has to get his pig eating again or lose the fat-pig prize to his arch nemesis.

Lord Clarence Emsworth’s pride and joy, the prize-winning pig Empress of Blandings refuses to eat when Cyril the pig-man is jailed by Clarence’s conniving rival Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe.

With the prize’s weigh-in only two-weeks away, Clarence and his gambling, spendthrift son Freddie are desperate to get the Empress to eat.

Meanwhile, Clarence’s sister Connie attempts to thwart her niece Angela’s love affair with ex-cowboy Jimmy and instead find her a more eminent match in the smarmy Heacham – Sir Gregory’s nephew!

'Sublime comic genius'
Ben Elton

'You don't analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.'
Stephen Fry

'The funniest writer ever to put words to paper.'
Hugh Laurie

'P.G. Wodehouse remains the greatest chronicler of a certain kind of Englishness, that no one else has ever captured quite so sharply, or with quite as much wit and affection.'
Julian Fellowes

Blandings: Lord Emsworth and the Girlfriend

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

EPISODE 3 IN A MAJOR BBC DRAMA STARRING TIMOTHY SPALL, DAVID WALLIAMS AND JENNIFER SAUNDERS
Disaster at the annual fete at Blandings Castle.

It is the annual fete at Blandings Castle, and Connie will again force Clarence to wear a miserable top-hat and make a speech. To top it off, he is banned from picking his favourite flowers by terrifying head-gardener McAllister.

However, Clarence befriends Gladys and Ern, two cheeky school-children who encourage him to do what he wants. Connie is of course scandalised, and brings her howitzers to bear on the ghastly intruders.

Freddie - needing to tap his old man for some cash - tries to help Clarence and the children and inevitably makes everything worse.

‘Sublime comic genius’
Ben Elton

‘You don't analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.’
Stephen Fry

‘The funniest writer ever to put words to paper.’
Hugh Laurie

‘P.G. Wodehouse remains the greatest chronicler of a certain kind of Englishness, that no one else has ever captured quite so sharply, or with quite as much wit and affection.’
Julian Fellowes

Blandings: Company for Gertrude

P.G. Wodehouse (Author)

EPISODE 5 IN A MAJOR BBC DRAMA STARRING TIMOTHY SPALL, DAVID WALLIAMS AND JENNIFER SAUNDERS
Freddie must keep his new Portuguese wife a secret from Connie.

Clarence’s niece - the lisping Gertrude - has been imprisoned at Blandings by Connie and forced to overhaul Clarence’s library. It’s driving him crazy. Gertrude’s forbidden love, the clumsy Revd Beefy Bingham, infiltrates Blandings using a false identity determined to win Clarence’s approval for the match.

Meanwhile, Freddie has inadvertently married a Portuguese exotic dancer and must do his utmost to keep it a secret from Connie.

‘Sublime comic genius’
Ben Elton

‘You don't analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.’
Stephen Fry

‘The funniest writer ever to put words to paper.’
Hugh Laurie

‘P.G. Wodehouse remains the greatest chronicler of a certain kind of Englishness, that no one else has ever captured quite so sharply, or with quite as much wit and affection.’
Julian Fellowes

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