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Summer Promise/A Gull Named Helen/Children on the Shore (Storycuts)

Elvi Rhodes (Author)

In 'Summer Promise', Linda, recently divorced and in need of a break, decides to take her two children on a fortnight's holiday in France, renting a house from a friend of a friend. However when she arrives at the house, she finds a man already there, claiming to be the owner. It emerges that this man, Graham, is the ex-husband of the woman who suggested the idea to Linda, and that she had forgotten to inform her that the situation had changed and that Graham now owns the house outright. He makes it clear to Linda that they can't possibly stay there as he is busy with work and it would be an inconvenience. But as Linda frantically tries to find a hotel, her youngest child James falls ill with chicken pox. Graham relents, and agrees to let them stay in the house, packing his bags to move out for two weeks. But as he is leaving, they both realise that perhaps this situation could work out for both of them after all...

In 'A Gull Named Helen', when little Daniel clams up following the death of his grandmother, everyone thinks a school trip to the seaside will be just what he needs. In the lighthouse where they are staying, Daniel is offered the little room right at the very top of the tower, while the other children must sleep in the basement. Watching from his bedroom window, Daniel becomes mesmerised by the seagulls circling overhead. As he spends the next few days feeding them scraps of bread, he forms a bond with one bird in particular, who he decides is called Helen - the same name as his grandmother. But little does he know that what he learns from these birds could help him for years to come.

In 'Children on the Shore', Claire Foster has been used to living her own life, her own way. Her daughter lives abroad with her own family. Claire was widowed years ago. So when she takes a temporary job as a secretary at a hospital, she is startled to find herself beginning a relationship with one of the doctors. Meanwhile, her daughter begins writing to her frequently, begging her to move closer to them so that she can be a part of her grandchildren's lives. And then she is offered a new job, working for an author, which would reduce her free time dramatically. Which path - if any - should she choose?

Part of the Storycuts series, these three short stories were previously published in the collection 'Summer Promise and Other Stories'.

Superhuman

Lord Robert Winston (Author) , Lori Oliwenstein (Author)

Accompanying the major new BBC documentary series, Superhuman explores the human bodys astonishing ability to heal, renew and regenerate itself. In recording the before, during and after of radical operations on real people it introduces us to the pioneering efforts of medical teams and alerts us to the ethical issues that new medical advances raise. Over six chapters Superhuman addresses significant developments within six key medical areas: cancer, infection, transplantation, trauma, repair and reproduction. Acknowledging the debt modern physicians owe to yesterday Superhuman begins by investigating the human bodys innate abilities to heal itself. And, as we gladly launch ourselves into an age of biotechnology, it questions whether we might now use all the information available to us to comprehend finally how our bodies work? If we can achieve that, perhaps becoming superhuman is truly within our reach. Chapter one introduces us to the trauma surgeons who have discovered that the shock that follows trauma can prove beneficial in saving the body and the brain. Chapter two chronicles the astonishing technology now being used in medical transplants and the contentious issues these processes excite. Should technology continue to develop apace how are doctors and patients to choose between using an artificial limb created specifically for a patient, a human limb grown from the patients own genetic information, or the alternative solutions offered by the animal kingdom? And is intervention of true benefit to the patient if it requires a lifetime of immuno-suppressing drugs? The recent successes of the Human Genome Project have dissolved the boundaries of regeneration with made-to-order organs no longer beyond our limits. Chapter three presents the scientists responsible for engineering human tissue from materials found in the body and outlines how they might help us might claim our lost powers of regeneration. Chapter four relates how we are faring in the battle against the old enemy cancer and tells how experts in this field are trying to regain control of the cancer cells that turn against us. Chapter five explains how we strive to combat the threats we all face living in a modern world teeming with globetrotters who share one feature we're all potential contagion-carriers. Superhuman goes on to inform of the dangers of pushing too far to eradicate infectious disease from our lives completely. Chapter six spotlights an area of considerable debate that will possibly alter the course of human evolution fertility and genetic manipulation. Superhuman discusses both the advantages and the dangers of new technologies in this area, arguing that they have many positive applications and that often the hazards are overstated, solely through fear. In an attempt never to lose sight of our humanity while inviting the superhuman in us all to work, Superhuman encourages a holistic approach to medicine and an open forum for the discussion of the future of medical science.

What The Industrial Revolution Did For Us

Gavin Weightman (Author)

The latest in the popular What theDid For Us series of books, What the Industrial Revolution Did For Us is a journey back in time, giving the reader an insight into how British life was transformed between 1750 and 1830, and how it shaped the world we live in today. So what did the Industrial Revolution do for us? Without the huge advances in science, engineering and medicine and the cast of extraordinarily colourful inventors and scientists who revolutionised the way we think, our modern world would be very different. We would be without vaccinations against contagious diseases and have no anaesthetics for surgery. The industrial revolution also gave birth to our national obsession with tea drinking, the mass production of crockery for the house-proud newly emerging Middle Classes and the transformation of clothing worn by the ordinary man and woman. As well as huge leaps in the evolution of machinery and manufacturing, our transport system was completely overhauled as the first ever steam trains emerged, roads were drastically improved, and canal mania took over Britain. The great industrial cities burgeoned and London became the international power it still is today. From the quacks advertising their potions to the new Middle Classes to the great innovators and entrepreneurs such as Robert Stephenson, James Watt and Josiah Wedgwood, What the Industrial Revolution Did For Us takes us right to the heart of the excitement of this revolutionary age. This book and the BBC television series it accompanies takes us back in time in the eyes of the eighteenth century tourist embracing the newness and invention of this incredible era. Contents: Introduction by Dan Cruickshank Chapter 1: A Potent Brew Chapter 1 looks at the remarkable discoveries that, in just 100 years, created the modern global economy and much of the world in which we live. It tells the story of coal and iron, but also of tea, the invention of the toaster and how Kew Gardens came to be formed. Chapter 2: New Lives: New Landscapes How industrialisation changed the face of modern Britain with the development of machines that took work out of the home and into factories. Chapter 3: Steaming Along We travel through the longest tunnels, over the highest bridges and in the first ever steam trains to explore the impact of the Industrial Revolution on the way we get from A to B. Chapter 4: The Lure of London From the architecture of London to the development of shopping and the start of the modern consumer society. Chapter 5: A Remedy for Quacks Up until the mid 18th century, you had a better chance of survival if you chose not to visit a doctor. But these rather grim facts of life and death were about to change. The Industrial Revolution brought the hope that technology and progress might produce a world without disease and suffering. Modern Medicine covers everything from anaesthetic to Scurvy, vaccines to madness. Chapter 6: Cannon-Fire This chapter focuses on the developments taking place in warfare and weapons during this turbulent period.

Brain On Fire: My Month of Madness

Susannah Cahalan (Author)

Brain on Fire is the stunning debut from journalist and author Susannah Cahalan, recounting the real-life horror story of how a sudden and mysterious illness put her on descent into a madness for which there seemed to be no cure

'My first serious blackout marked the line between sanity and insanity. Though I would have moments of lucidity over the coming days and weeks, I would never again be the same person ...'

Susannah Cahalan was a happy, clever, healthy twenty-four-year old. Then one day she woke up in hospital, with no memory of what had happened or how she had got there. Within weeks, she would be transformed into someone unrecognizable, descending into a state of acute psychosis, undergoing rages and convulsions, hallucinating that her father had murdered his wife; that she could control time with her mind. Everything she had taken for granted about her life, and who she was, was wiped out.

This is Susannah's story of her terrifying descent into madness and the desperate hunt for a diagnosis, as, after dozens of tests and scans, baffled doctors concluded she should be confined in a psychiatric ward. It is also the story of how one brilliant man, Syria-born Dr Najar, finally proved - using a simple pen and paper - that Susannah's psychotic behaviour was caused by a rare autoimmune disease attacking her brain. His diagnosis of this little-known condition, thought to have been the real cause of devil-possessions through history, saved her life, and possibly the lives of many others. Cahalan takes readers inside this newly-discovered disease through the progress of her own harrowing journey, piecing it together using memories, journals, hospital videos and records. Written with passionate honesty and intelligence, Brain on Fire is a searingly personal yet universal book, which asks what happens when your identity is suddenly destroyed, and how you get it back.

'With eagle-eye precision and brutal honesty, Susannah Cahalan turns her journalistic gaze on herself as she bravely looks back on one of the most harrowing and unimaginable experiences one could ever face: the loss of mind, body and self ... a mesmerizing story', Mira Bartók, New York Times bestselling author of The Memory Palace

Susannah Cahalan is a reporter on the New York Post, and the recipient of the 2010 Silurian Award of Excellence in Journalism for Feature Writing. Her writing has also appeared in the New York Times, and is frequently picked up by the Daily Mail, Gawker, Gothamist, AOL and Yahoo among other news aggregrator sites.

Topsy and Tim: Start School

Jean Adamson (Author) , Belinda Worsley (Illustrator)

Topsy and Tim Start School by Jean and Gareth Adamson helps children start school.

Topsy and Tim Start School is a perfect, reassuring picture book for children who are just about to start school. Along with favourite characters Topsy and Tim, children will learn what to expect in lessons, in the playground - even in the canteen - and, more importantly, that school can be fun! The Topsy and Tim books have been beautifully updated with contemporary artwork, but they remain instantly recognisable and trusted characters that parents will remember from their own childhoods. This edition also includes a puzzle and a map of Topsy and Tim's village that parents can use to teach their children basic map skills and directions.

Topsy and Tim have all sorts of new experiences - just like you!

Find out what happens on the twins' first day at school.

Jean and Gareth Adamson have sold over 21 million copies in fifty years of their iconic Topsy and Tim books, the most popular titles were re-issued in April 2008. Topsy and Tim help guide children through various 'new experiences', such as a new baby in Topsy and Tim: The New Baby and recycling in Topsy and Tim Go Green, with captivating storylines fun characters and engaging pictures.

Visit www.topsyandtim.com for interactive Topsy and Tim stories or download the Topsy and Tim Start School app for iPhone.

Other Topsy and Tim titles available from Ladybird:

Topsy and Tim: Help a Friend; Topsy and Tim: Go on a Trainl Topsy and Time Meet the Police; Topsy and Tim: Go to the Doctor; Topsy and Tim: Go to the Dentist; Topsy and Tim: Go to the Zoo; Topsy and Tim Visit London; Topsy and Tim: Go on an Aeroplane; Topsy and Tim: Go Camping; Topsy and Tim Safety First; Topsy and Tim: The New Baby; Topsy and Tim Meet the Firefighters; Topsy and Tim have Itchy Heads; Topsy and Tim: Play Football; Topsy and Tim: Buckets and Spades; Topsy and Tim: Car Games; Topsy and Tim: little Shoppers; Topsy and Tim: At the Farm; Topsy and Tim: Little Lost Rabbit; Topsy and Tim: The Big Surprise; Topsy and Tim: Go to the Park; Topsy and Tim: Look After their Pets; Topsy and Tip: Have Chickenpox; Topsy and Tim: Make a New Friend; Topsy and Tim: Busy Builders; Topsy and Tim; Meet the Police; Topsy and Tim: Red Boots, Yellow Boots; Topsy and Tim Sticker Storybook: Start School; Topsy and Tim: Learn to Swim; Topsy and Tim: Have a Birthday Party; Topsy and Tim Sticker Storybook: Have a Happy Birthday; Topsy and Tim: Go to Hospital; Topsy and Tim Go for Gold; Topsy and Tim Sticker Storybook: Go on an Aeroplane; Start School with Topsy and Tim: Wipe Clean First Writing; Start School with Topsy and Tim: Wipe Clean First Numbers

The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen, 83¼ Years Old

Hendrik Groen (Author) , Hester Velmans (Translator)

** THE INTERNATIONAL PHENOMENON **

'There are many laughs in this book but it's so much more than just a comedy. It's a story about how friendship, selflessness and dignity lie at the heart of the human experience. When I'm an old man, I want to be Hendrik Groen' John Boyne, author of international bestseller The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas

***

'Another year and I still don't like old people. Me? I am 83 years old.'

Hendrik Groen may be old, but he is far from dead and isn't planning to be buried any time soon. Granted, his daily strolls are getting shorter because his legs are no longer willing and he had to visit his doctor more than he'd like. Technically speaking he is ... elderly. But surely there is more to life at his age than weak tea and potted geraniums?

Hendrik sets out to write an exposé: a year in the life of his care home in Amsterdam, revealing all its ups and downs - not least his new endeavour the anarchic Old-But-Not Dead Club. And when Eefje moves in - the woman Hendrik has always longed for - he polishes his shoes (and his teeth), grooms what's left of his hair and attempts to make something of the life he has left, with hilarious, tender and devastating consequences.

The indomitable Hendrik Groen - Holland's unlikeliest hero - has become a cultural phenomenon in his native Netherlands and now he and his famously anonymous creator are conquering the globe. A major Dutch bestseller, The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen will not only delight older readers with its wit and relevance, but will charm and inspire those who have years to go before their own expiry date.

***
Praise for The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen, 83 ¼ Years Old

'A story with a great deal of heart, it pulled me in with its self-deprecating humour, finely drawn characters and important themes. Anyone who hopes to grow old with dignity will have much to reflect on' Graeme Simsion

'There are many laughs in this book but it's so much more than just a comedy. It's a story about how friendship, selflessness and dignity lie at the heart of the human experience. When I'm an old man, I want to be Hendrik Groen' John Boyne

'A funny but also touching diary praised for its wit and realism' BBC Radio 4 Front Row

'I laughed until I cried and then laughed and cried some more' David Suchet

'Thoughtful, anxious and gruff... Laced with humour' The Best New Fiction Mail on Sunday

'Amusing [and] wickedly accurate ... I was constantly put in mind of One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, another comi-tragedy concerning the tyranny of institutions of the unwanted. Enjoy Groen's light touch but do not be fooled by it. We live in an ageing society. The Secret Diary of Hendrik Groen is a handbook of resistance for our time' ***** FIVE STARS Sunday Express

'Highly entertaining ... a delightful and touching saga of one man's way of coping with old age ... we may assume that Hendrik Groen is a character of fiction. But it is a fiction so closely based on the observation of real life that it is utterly convincing' Daily Express

'A joy to read, as much concerned with friendship and dignity as it is with the debilitating effects of aging ... An entertaining and uplifting story of a man in the winter of his days, stoic in the face of bureaucratic nonsense and an unabashed need to wear a nappy. Imagined or not, this is the diary of someone who wants nothing more than to be allowed see out his days with dignity and respect. It's not too much to ask, really, is it?' John Boyne Irish Times

'Full of off-beat charm and quirky characters' Cathy Rentzenbrink, Stylist

'Hendrik pens an exposé of his care home, sets up the Old-But-Not-Dead club and relishes the arrival of a new female resident. This geriatric Adrian Mole made me laugh and think. Terrific' Fanny Blake, Woman and Home

Jon Culshaw and Meera Syal

Comedian and audiobook narrator Jon Culshaw joins Meera Syal in the Penguin studio in a...

The Great British Dream Factory by Dominic Sandbrook

Historian Dominic Sandbrook reveals the unlikely beginnings of a Black Sabbath guitaris...

In a Different Key by John Donvan and Caren Zucker

In a Different Key takes us on a journey from an era when families were shamed and chil...

Zoe Bohm on The Liberty Colouring Book

We spoke with editor of The Liberty Colouring Book, Zoe Bohm, about working with the i...

The 5th Wave playlist

Immerse yourself in a soundtrack inspired by Rick Yancey's classic YA novel, The 5t...

The Noonday Demon by Andrew Solomon

The Noonday Demon is a moving and exhaustively researched chronicle of how depression i...

Tania James

Tania James shares her inspiration behind her new novel, The Tusk That Did the Damage, ...

Ruth Ware on the books that taught her how to build suspense

Ruth Ware shares the crime and thriller novels that inspired her to become a writer.

Penelope Fitzgerald on A Month in the Country by J.L. Carr

Read an extract from Penelope Fitzgerald's introduction to one of the great modern ...

Ward No. 6 and Other Stories by Anton Chekov

Read an extract from The Student, one of Anton Chekhov’s short stories from his collect...

Ghostly by Audrey Niffenegger

Ghostly is a new short story collection curated and illustrated by Audrey Niffenegger. ...

The Face of Britain by Simon Schama

In this extract from The Face of Britain, art historian Simon Schama tells the story of...

The Brain's Way of Healing by Norman Doidge

Read an extract from of The Brain’s Way of Healing: Stories of Remarkable Recoveries an...

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