Reviews

  • Urgent, profound and extraordinarily timely

    John Banville
  • This is the most astonishing, convincing, and disturbing book I've read in years

    Joe Sacco
  • Incisive and scary.. a wake-up call

    Nick Fraser, Guardian
  • Far from reassuring... his vision is unusually broad, accommodating and resistant to categorisation. It is the kind of vision the world needs right now...Pankaj Mishra shouldn't stop thinking.

    Christopher de Bellaigue, Financial Times
  • This is a framework that pushes aside conventional, familiar divisions of left and right to focus on the profound sense of dislocation and alienation that spawned (and still spawns) movements ranging from fascism to anarchism to nihilism...a short book into which a lot of intellectual history has been packed.

    Laura Miller, Slate
  • Stimulating... thought-provoking

    Richard Evans, Guardian
  • A valuable book. Mishra's ideas are bold and initially discomfiting - it's a challenge to look over the head of the latest terrorist and try to dispassionately trace his rage back to Voltaire - but it's undeniably good to stretch intellectual muscles and test your own prejudices. Mishra invites us to hear the ugly, muffled shouts beneath the "drumbeat" of Western civilisation.

    Julie McDowall, Sunday Herald
  • Mishra reads like a brilliant autodidact, putting to shame the many students who dutifully did the reading for their classes but missed the incandescent fire and penetrating insight in canonical texts... no one has discerned better than Mishra just how far we still are from the top.

    Samuel Moyn, New Republic
  • Around the world, both East and West, the insurrectionary fury of militants, zealots and populists has overturned the post-Cold-War global consensus. Where does their rage come from, and where will it end? One of the sharpest cultural critics and political analysts releases his landmark "history of the present

    Boyd Tonkin, Newsweek
  • An original attempt to explain today's paranoid hatreds...Iconoclastic...Mr. Mishra shocks on many levels.

    Economist