Reviews

  • Definitely don't miss the return of Sophie Mackintosh... Blue Ticket gets to the root of women's ambivalence and confusion around becoming mothers set against an unsettling dystopia; she's amazing

    Stylist, Best Autumn Reads 2020
  • Dreamlike, tense, compelling... Blue Ticket adds something new to the dystopian tradition set by Orwell's 1984 or Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale... Piercing moments of wisdom and insight drive toward a pitch-perfect ending

    The New York Times
  • The cool intensity and strange beauty of Blue Ticket is a wonder - be sure to read everything Sophie Mackintosh writes

    Deborah Levy, author of 'Hot Milk'
  • Even more hallucinatory and spiralled than her first [novel]... Terrifying and enchanting in equal measure

    Lit Hub, Best New Books to Read This Summer
  • The Handmaid's Tale as told by David Lynch... A bona fide chase narrative as well as a polyvalent, dream-like allegory of pregnancy and bodily change - not to mention the vortex of judgement that surrounds womanhood... Mackintosh is part of an exciting generation of writers, including Daisy Johnson and Julia Armfield... Blue Ticket stands apart from the crowd

    Anthony Cummins, iNews
  • One of the most disquieting novels I've read in a long time, Blue Ticket will worms its way under your skin and haunt your dreams

    Red, 'Best Books of August'
  • Gripping, ethereal, atmospheric... Mackintosh handles haziness deliberately and with poise, demonstrating the near impossibility of trying to articulate or rationalise maternal desire

    Sunday Times
  • Mackintosh writes with a language drawn from the body.... Impressionistic and haunting in equal measure

    Annabel Nugent, Independent
  • Visceral, primal, striking... This is a potent exploration of biology and agency, motherhood and childlessness, which confirms [Mackintosh] as a writer of note

    Daily Mail
  • Mackintosh is part of a new generation of female writers creating feminist fictions that relate uncannily to our dystopian times... [Her] fiction lives, to an unusual extent, in its musicality, in the rhythm and spareness of its sentences

    Claire Armitstead, Guardian Review

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