Ghost Stories by H G Wells

Ghost Stories by H G Wells

Six chilling tales from BBC Radio 4

Summary

David McAlister reads six supernatural stories from the author of The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds

Best known for his science fiction, H.G. Wells was also a master of the ghost story, producing numerous tales of the gothic, the eldritch and the uncanny. These six stories, ranging from the humorous to the horrifying, epitomise the very best of Wells’ occult fiction.

The Moth
Two entomologists are embroiled in a scientific feud. When one dies, the other believes he has discovered a rare new species...

The Story of the Late Mr Elvesham
A medical student gets more than he bargained for when he accepts an old man’s bequest.

The Temptation of Harringay
Struggling with his latest portrait, an artist is shocked to find it taking on a distinctly diabolical air.

The Inexperienced Ghost
A man encounters a timid spirit haunting his club, and helps him out – with dreadful consequences.

The Stolen Body
A psychical researcher attempts an out-of-body experience, with terrifying results.

The Door in the Wall
Lionel Wallace is haunted by the memory of a green door in a white wall, leading to an enchanted garden. Can he ever find it again?

Duration: 90 mins approx.

About the author

H.G. Wells

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, Kent, in 1866. After an education repeatedly interrupted by his family’s financial problems, he eventually found work as a teacher at a succession of schools, where he began to write his first stories.
Wells became a prolific writer with a diverse output, of which the famous works are his science fiction novels. These are some of the earliest and most influential examples of the genre, and include classics such as The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds. Most of his books very well-received, and had a huge influence on many younger writers, including George Orwell and Isaac Asimov. Wells also wrote many popular non-fiction books, and used his writing to support the wide range of political and social causes in which he had an interest, although these became increasingly eccentric towards the end of his life.
Twice-married, Wells had many affairs, including a ten-year liaison with Rebecca West that produced a son. He died in London in 1946.
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