Can’t We Just Print More Money?

Can’t We Just Print More Money?

Economics in Ten Simple Questions

Summary

'A well-written treat' Professor David Spiegelhalter, author of The Art of Statistics
'An enjoyable introduction' The Times
'Entertaining and essential' Laura Whateley, author of Money: A User's Guide
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Why are all my clothes made in Asia? How come I'm so much richer than my great-great-grandma? And what even is money?


Whether you're buying lunch, looking for a job, or applying for a mortgage, the thing we call 'the economy' is going to set the terms. A pity, then, that many of us have no idea how the economy actually works.

That's where this book comes in. The Bank of England is Britain's most important financial institution, responsible for printing money, regulating banks and keeping the economy running smoothly. Now, the Bank's team take you inside their hallowed halls to explain what economics can - and can't - teach us about the world. Along the way, they offer intriguing examples of econ in action: in financial crises and Freddo prices, growth stages and workers' wages. Accessible, authoritative and surprisingly witty, this is a crash course in economics and why it matters.
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'If you feel you should understand how economists think but have no idea where to start, this book is the answer . . . Buy this book for the inquiring person, young, old or in between.' Martin Wolf, Financial Times

The Sunday Times Business Bestseller

Reviews

  • If you feel you should understand how economists think but have no idea where to start, this book is the answer . . . The Bank should be congratulated on this effort at education. Buy this book for the inquiring person, young, old or in between.
    Martin Wolf, Summer Books, Financial Times

About the authors

Rupal Patel

Rupal Patel became interested in economics during the 2007-8 financial crisis, when she was still at school. She soon started wondering why Woolworths was closing down, why the news was suddenly filled with GDP figures, and what all this had to do with the money in her pocket. Today, Rupal is an economist at the Bank of England, where she spends her days trying to make sure such crashes don't happen in future - and working out how to respond if they do.

Growing up on a little island just off the North Kent coast, Jack Meaning first got into economics as a way of explaining the changing world around him. That interest soon spiralled out of control, leading him to study for a degree in the subject, then another, and then another. In the years since finishing his PhD, Jack has worked with governments and policymakers around the world, latterly as an adviser to two Chief Economists at the Bank of England.

The Bank of England is the UK's central bank, founded in 1694 to 'promote the public good and benefit of the people'. How it does so has changed a bit since then, but the Bank still plays a crucial role in the economy - printing money, setting interest rates and regulating the financial sector. Since 2017, the Bank's staff have been on a mission to get outside the City of London and promote economic literacy across the UK: whether by delivering talks in schools, running Citizens' Panels on people's economic experiences, or, now, publishing this nifty primer on economics.
Learn More

The Bank of England

Rupal Patel became interested in economics during the 2007-8 financial crisis, when she was still at school. She soon started wondering why Woolworths was closing down, why the news was suddenly filled with GDP figures, and what all this had to do with the money in her pocket. Today, Rupal is an economist at the Bank of England, where she spends her days trying to make sure such crashes don't happen in future - and working out how to respond if they do.

Growing up on a little island just off the North Kent coast, Jack Meaning first got into economics as a way of explaining the changing world around him. That interest soon spiralled out of control, leading him to study for a degree in the subject, then another, and then another. In the years since finishing his PhD, Jack has worked with governments and policymakers around the world, latterly as an adviser to two Chief Economists at the Bank of England.

The Bank of England is the UK's central bank, founded in 1694 to 'promote the public good and benefit of the people'. How it does so has changed a bit since then, but the Bank still plays a crucial role in the economy - printing money, setting interest rates and regulating the financial sector. Since 2017, the Bank's staff have been on a mission to get outside the City of London and promote economic literacy across the UK: whether by delivering talks in schools, running Citizens' Panels on people's economic experiences, or, now, publishing this nifty primer on economics.
Learn More

Jack Meaning

Rupal Patel became interested in economics during the 2007-8 financial crisis, when she was still at school. She soon started wondering why Woolworths was closing down, why the news was suddenly filled with GDP figures, and what all this had to do with the money in her pocket. Today, Rupal is an economist at the Bank of England, where she spends her days trying to make sure such crashes don't happen in future - and working out how to respond if they do.

Growing up on a little island just off the North Kent coast, Jack Meaning first got into economics as a way of explaining the changing world around him. That interest soon spiralled out of control, leading him to study for a degree in the subject, then another, and then another. In the years since finishing his PhD, Jack has worked with governments and policymakers around the world, latterly as an adviser to two Chief Economists at the Bank of England.

The Bank of England is the UK's central bank, founded in 1694 to 'promote the public good and benefit of the people'. How it does so has changed a bit since then, but the Bank still plays a crucial role in the economy - printing money, setting interest rates and regulating the financial sector. Since 2017, the Bank's staff have been on a mission to get outside the City of London and promote economic literacy across the UK: whether by delivering talks in schools, running Citizens' Panels on people's economic experiences, or, now, publishing this nifty primer on economics.
Learn More

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