Dennis Spooner

Doctor Who: The Lost TV Episodes Collection Two
  • Doctor Who: The Lost TV Episodes Collection Two

  • Four more thrilling soundtrack adventures from the early days of Doctor Who, featuring serials lost from the TV archive.

    The pictures may be lost, but each of these stories survives as a soundtrack recording. Remastered, and with additional linking narration, they can be enjoyed once more.

    In The Daleks' Master Plan, the Daleks have stolen the Time Destructor, and are threatening to destroy the fabric of Time itself. Pursued across Time and Space, the TARDIS crew are in grave danger.

    In The Massacre, the TARDIS materialises in Paris, 1572, a time of danger and religious strife. When Steven witnesses an execution, he believes the Doctor has been executed in front of his eyes.

    In The Celestial Toymaker, the travellers arrive in the domain of the Toymaker, where failure to win a series of games could result in them becoming playthings for eternity.

    In The Savages, the TARDIS arrives on a distant and seemingly idyllic world, but the Doctor, Steven and Dodo discovers that it hides a terrible secret.

    Special linking narration is provided by Peter Purves, who also recalls his time making the original episodes in a bonus interview. Also included is an edition of BBC Radio's Archive on 4 from 2009.

    In 'Doctor Who -- The Lost Episodes' Shaun Ley investigates what happened to the missing episodes of Doctor Who from the 1960s.

    The CD editions also feature PDF files featuring high quality scans of the original BBC TV camera scripts. Duration: 10 hours 20 mins approx

    (P) & © 2019 BBC Studios Distribution For cast and credits see accompanying PDF booklet available on purchase.

RELEASED 01/08/2019

Terry Nation (Author) Terry Nation was born in Llandaff, near Cardiff, in 1930. As a child, he loved reading and making up stories, and on leaving school he became interested in the theatre, writing and appearing in plays for his local theatrical society. In the early 1950s, he left home and moved to London, where he attempted to launch a career in stand-up comedy. However, he soon found that he lacked performing skills, and hearing that a local agency was looking for comedy scriptwriters he decided to take his material to them. Associated London Scripts liked his work, and hired him to write a 13-week comedy radio show called All My Eye And Kitty Blewitt. This launched his writing career, and throughout the 1950s he produced over 200 scripts for comedians such as Terry Scott, Eric Sykes, Harry Worth and Frankie Howerd. His TV breakthrough came in 1963, when he wrote several episodes for Tony Hancock’s ITV series Hancock. The same year, he was asked to write the second serial for a newly-launched BBC science fiction series, Doctor Who, and the Daleks were born. Nation’s inspiration for the creation of his iconic mechanical monsters came partly from a TV programme. He realised that the creatures had to truly look alien, and ‘In order to make it non-human what you have to do is take the legs off. That's the only way you can make it not look like a person dressed up.’ After watching the Georgian State Dancers perform, he realised how this could be achieved. He explained: ‘the girls do this wonderful routine. They wore floor-brushing skirts and took very tiny steps and appeared to glide, really glide across the floor. That's the movement I wanted for the Daleks.’ He once said that the name ‘Dalek’ came from the letters DAL-LEK on the spine of an encyclopedia, but later admitted that this was just an attempt to satisfy persistent journalists. When asked the reason for the phenomenal success of the Daleks, Nation answered simply 'Kids love to be frightened'. He went on to write several more Dalek stories for Doctor Who, including ‘The Dalek Invasion of Earth’ (1964), The Chase' (1965), 'The Daleks' Master Plan' (with Dennis Spooner, 1965-1966) and 'Genesis of the Daleks' (1975), and also penned two non-Dalek episodes, 'The Keys of Marinus' (1964) and 'The Android Invasion' (1979). As well as Doctor Who, Terry Nation’s TV work also includes The Saint, Department S, The Persuaders and The Avengers. He also created two other sci-fi cult hits. Survivors began as a novel, published in 1970. It was televised five years later and ran for three series between 1975 and 1977, and a 2008 remake was broadcast by the BBC in 2008. Blake’s 7, described by Nation as ‘Robin Hood in space’, ran for four series from 1978-1981. It was an international success, and continues to have a huge fan following today. Terry Nation died in LA in 1997. Dennis Spooner (Author) Dennis Spooner was script editor of Doctor Who during the William Hartnell era, and wrote several stories for the show, including The Reign of Terror and The Romans. He also wrote for the Gerry Anderson series' Supercar, Fireball XL5, Stingray and Thunderbirds, and co-created five espionage series' including Man in a Suitcase, Department S and The Adventurer. Spooner also created the cult detective series Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased). He died in September 1986. John Lucarotti (Author) John Lucarotti was born in England and spent nine years in the Royal Navy during and after the Second World War. He then went to North America to work for Imperial Oil. It was here that he began writing. Later, he scripted an eighteen-part radio series about the life of Marco Polo for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, but at one point found himself earning more money as an encyclopedia salesman than as a writer. Consequently he decided to focus on the US market. By the late Fifties he had taken Canadian citizenship, and then returned to England, where he became involved in TV work. He had recently moved to Majorca when, at Syndey Newman's suggestion, David Whitaker approached him to write for Doctor Who. Remembering his CBC series, he chose Marco Polo as his subject. Throughout the Sixties and Seventies, Lucarotti continued a successful TV career, creating the shows Operation Patch and The Ravelled Thread, among others, and contributing scripts to The Avengers, Doctor Who, Ghost Squad, Joe 90, The Man in Room 17, Murder Bag, New Scotland Yard, The Protectors, Moonbase 3, The Onedin Line, Star Maidens and Into the Labyrinth, his last credited screen work in 1981. He novelised his 1976 serial Operation Patch (Target, 1976) and the 1979/1980 series The Ravelled Thread (Puffin Books, 1979). He contributed the first Brief Encounter short story for Doctor Who Magazine in 1990, in which the author met the First Doctor in a French bar. The story was reprinted in the 1992 Doctor Who Yearbook (Marvel, 1991). John Lucarotti died in Paris, France, on 20 November 1994 aged 68.