Thomas Hobbes

Leviathan
  • Leviathan

  • 'The life of man, solitary, poore, nasty, brutish, and short'

    Written during the chaos of the English Civil War, Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan asks how, in a world of violence and horror, can we stop ourselves from descending into anarchy? Hobbes' case for a 'common-wealth' under a powerful sovereign - or 'Leviathan' - to enforce security and the rule of law, shocked his contemporaries, and his book was publicly burnt for sedition the moment it was published. But his penetrating work of political philosophy - now fully revised and with a new introduction for this edition - opened up questions about the nature of statecraft and society that influenced governments across the world.

    Edited with a new introduction by Christopher Brooke

Thomas Hobbes was an English philosopher. Born in Malmesbury, Wiltshire, he studied at Oxford and spent most of his life employed by the aristocratic Cavendish family. His publications included a translation of Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War (1629); a comprehensive philosophical system set out in his trilogy, De Corpore (1655), De Homine (1658), and De Cive (1642); and the major statement of his political theory, Leviathan (1651). He died at Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire.'