Thomas Malory

King Arthur's Last Battle
  • King Arthur's Last Battle

  • He was born to be King. But he would die for his people ...

    From the moment he draws the sword Excalibur from a magic stone, King Arthur is hailed as the saviour of England. With his loyal band of brothers, the Knights of the Round Table, he reigns over a golden age of chivalry and enchantment.

    But dark forces are stirring in the land. Sir Launcelot's fatal attraction to Arthur's beautiful wife Guenever threatens to divide the realm. And when the scheming Mordred tries to usurp the King, one last epic battle must be fought on English soil ...

No one knows for sure who the author of Le Morte D'Arthur was, but the generally accepted theory is that of American scholar G.L. Kitteredge, who argued it was Sir Thomas Malory, born in the first quarter of the fifteenth century, and who spent the greatest part of his last twenty years in prison. Another possibility is a Thomas Malory of Studley and Hutton in Yorkshire, or an author living north of Warwickshire. It is generally accepted that the author was a member of the gentry and a Lancastrain. John Lawlor was Professor of English Language and Literature at the University of Keele. He is the author of The Tragic Sense in Shakespeare, Piers Plowman: An Essay in Criticism and Chaucer. Janet Cowen is a senior lecturer in English at King's College, University of London.

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