Tristram Hunt

Building Jerusalem
  • Building Jerusalem

  • 'History writing at its compulsive best' A. N. Wilson

    This is a history of the ideas that shaped not only London, but Manchester, Glasgow, Liverpool, Leeds, Birmingham, Sheffield and other power-houses of 19th-century Britain. It charts the controversies and visions that fostered Britain's greatest civic renaissance.

    Tristram Hunt explores the horrors of the Victorian city, as seen by Dickens, Engels and Carlyle; the influence of the medieval Gothic ideal of faith, community and order espoused by Pugin and Ruskin; the pride in self-government, identified with the Saxons as opposed to the Normans; the identification with the city republics of the Italian renaissance - commerce, trade and patronage; the change from the civic to the municipal, and greater powers over health, education and housing; and finally at the end of the century, the retreat from the urban to the rural ideal, led by William Morris and the garden-city movement of Ebenezer Howard.

RELEASED 26/09/2019

Tristram Hunt is one of Britain's best-known historians. He was elected MP for Stoke-on-Trent Central in 2010, and between October 2013 and September 2015 served as Shadow Secretary of State for Education. He is a senior lecturer in British history at Queen Mary, University of London, and has written numerous series for radio and television and since 2017 has been Director of the V&A. His previous books include The English Civil War: At First Hand, The Frock-Coated Communist: The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels and Ten Cities that Made an Empire, between them published in more than a dozen languages.