Books

The Amazing Hat Mystery

P.G. Wodehouse

'Wodehouse is a tonic' - New Yorker.

A Wodehouse pick-me-up that'll lift your spirits, whatever your mood.

Cheaper and more effective than Valium’.*

Offers ‘relief from anxiety, raginess or an afternoon-long tendency towards the sour’.*

‘Read when you’re well and when you’re poorly; when you’re travelling, and when you’re not; when you’re feeling clever, and when you’re feeling utterly dim.’*

Whatever your mood, P. G. Wodehouse, widely acknowledged to be ‘the best English comic novelist of the century’*, is guaranteed to lift your spirits.

Why? Because ‘Mr Wodehouse’s idyllic world can never stale. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.’*

How? ‘You don’t analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.’*

*Olivia Williams *Caitlin Moran *Lynne Truss *Sebastian Faulks *Evelyn Waugh *Stephen Fry

Meet the Young Men in Spats – all members of the Drones Club, all crossed in love and all busy betting their sometimes non-existent fortunes on unlikely outcomes – that's when they're not recovering from driving their sports cars through, rather than round, Marble Arch.

These wonderful comic short stories are the essence of innocent fun. Here, you'll encounter some of Wodehouse's favourite characters – and, in 'The Amazing Hat Mystery', one of his favourite stories.

Contents:
- The Amazing Hat Mystery
- Uncle Fred Flits By
- Trouble Down at Tudsleigh

Goodbye to All Cats

P.G. Wodehouse

'Wodehouse is a tonic' - New Yorker.

A Wodehouse pick-me-up that'll lift your spirits, whatever your mood.

Cheaper and more effective than Valium’.*

Offers ‘relief from anxiety, raginess or an afternoon-long tendency towards the sour’.*

‘Read when you’re well and when you’re poorly; when you’re travelling, and when you’re not; when you’re feeling clever, and when you’re feeling utterly dim.’*

Whatever your mood, P. G. Wodehouse, widely acknowledged to be ‘the best English comic novelist of the century’*, is guaranteed to lift your spirits.

Why? Because ‘Mr Wodehouse’s idyllic world can never stale. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.’*

How? ‘You don’t analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.’*

*Olivia Williams *Caitlin Moran *Lynne Truss *Sebastian Faulks *Evelyn Waugh *Stephen Fry

Ever on the lookout for a quick buck, a solid gold fortune, or at least a plausible little scrounge, the irrepressible Ukridge gives con men a bad name. Looking like an animated blob of mustard in his bright yellow raincoat, he invests time, passion and energy (but seldom actual cash) in a series of increasingly bizarre money-making schemes. Shares in an accident syndicate? Easily arranged. Finance for a dog college? It's yours.

And if you throw in some cats, flying unexpectedly from windows, and a young man trying ever-more-desperately to impress the family of his latest love, you get a medley of Wodehouse delights in which lunacy and comic exuberance reign supreme.

Contents:
- Goodbye to All Cats
- Ukridge's Dog College
- Ukridge's Accident Syndicate

Mulliner’s Buck-U-Uppo

P.G. Wodehouse

'Wodehouse is a tonic' - New Yorker.

A Wodehouse pick-me-up that'll lift your spirits, whatever your mood.

‘Cheaper and more effective than Valium’.*

Offers ‘relief from anxiety, raginess or an afternoon-long tendency towards the sour’.*

‘Read when you’re well and when you’re poorly; when you’re travelling, and when you’re not; when you’re feeling clever, and when you’re feeling utterly dim.’*

Whatever your mood, P. G. Wodehouse, widely acknowledged to be ‘the best English comic novelist of the century’*, is guaranteed to lift your spirits.

Why? Because ‘Mr Wodehouse’s idyllic world can never stale. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.’*

How? ‘You don’t analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.’*

*Olivia Williams *Caitlin Moran *Lynne Truss *Sebastian Faulks *Evelyn Waugh *Stephen Fry

In the Angler's Rest, drinking hot scotch and lemon, sits one of Wodehouse's greatest raconteurs. Mr Mulliner, his vivid imagination lubricated by Miss Postlethwaite the barmaid, has fabulous stories to tell of the extraordinary behaviour of his far-flung family: there’s Cyril, the timid interior designer, who finds himself drunkenly playing 'this little piggy' with his beloved's formidable and angry mother's toes - how can that possibly end well?! And then there's Wilfred, who lights on the formula for Buck-U-Uppo, a tonic given to elephants to enable them to face tigers with the necessary nonchalance… Add one of the best Jeeves and Wooster stories and you’ve got a medley of Wodehouse delights in which lunacy and comic exuberance reign supreme.

Contents:
- Mulliner’s Buck-u-uppo
- The Spot of Art
- Strychnine in the Soup

The Smile that Wins

P.G. Wodehouse

'Wodehouse is a tonic' - New Yorker.

A Wodehouse pick-me-up that'll lift your spirits, whatever your mood.

‘Cheaper and more effective than Valium’.*

Offers ‘relief from anxiety, raginess or an afternoon-long tendency towards the sour’.*

‘Read when you’re well and when you’re poorly; when you’re travelling, and when you’re not; when you’re feeling clever, and when you’re feeling utterly dim.’*

Whatever your mood, P. G. Wodehouse, widely acknowledged to be ‘the best English comic novelist of the century’*, is guaranteed to lift your spirits.

Why? Because ‘Mr Wodehouse’s idyllic world can never stale. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in.’*

How? ‘You don’t analyse such sunlit perfection, you just bask in its warmth and splendour.’*

*Olivia Williams *Caitlin Moran *Lynne Truss *Sebastian Faulks *Evelyn Waugh *Stephen Fry

This collection contains two of the best Jeeves stories, in which the gentleman’s gentleman endeavours to smooth over Bertie Wooster’s relentless haplessness. Add in the story of a private detective who can make the guilty confess simply by smiling at them, told by one of Wodehouse’s greatest raconteurs, and you’ve got an assortment of Wodehouse delights in which lunacy and comic exuberance reign supreme.

Contents:
- The Smile that Wins
- Jeeves and the Song of Songs
- The Great Sermon Handicap

Classic Wodehouse

P.G. Wodehouse

'The funniest writer ever to put words to paper.' Hugh Laurie

Cocktail Time
An Uncle Fred novel

Frederick, Earl of Ickenham, remains young at heart. So it is for him the act of a moment to lean out of the Drones Club window with a catapult and ping the silk top-hat off his grumpy in-law, the distinguished barrister Sir Raymond Bastable. Unfortunately things don’t end there.

The sprightly earl finds that his action has inspired a scandalous bestseller and a film script – but this is as nothing compared with the entangled fates of the couples that surround him and which only his fabled sweetness and light can unravel.


Joy in the Morning
A Jeeves and Wooster novel

Trapped in rural Steeple Bumpleigh, a man less stalwart than Bertie Wooster would probably give way at the knees. For among those present were Florence Craye, to whom Bertie had once been engaged and her new fiancé ‘Stilton’ Cheesewright, who sees Bertie as a snake in the grass. And that biggest blot on the landscape, Edwin the Boy Scout, who is busy doing acts of kindness out of sheer malevolence.

All Bertie’s forebodings are fully justified. For in his efforts to oil the wheels of commerce, promote the course of true love and avoid the consequences of a vendetta, he becomes the prey of all and sundry. In fact only Jeeves can save him …


Summer Lightning
A Blandings novel

The Empress of Blandings, prize-winning pig and all-consuming passion of Clarence, Ninth Earl of Emsworth, has disappeared. Blandings Castle is in uproar and there are suspects a-plenty - from Galahad Threepwood (who is writing memoirs so scandalous they will rock the aristocracy to its foundations) to the Efficient Baxter, chilling former secretary to Lord Emsworth. Even Beach the Butler seems deeply embroiled. And what of Sir Gregory Parsloe-Parsloe, Clarence’s arch-rival, and his passion for prize-winning pigs?

With the castle full of deceptions and impostors, will Galahad’s memoirs ever see the light of day? And will the Empress be returned …?

Meet Mr Mulliner

In the Angler’s Rest, drinking hot scotch and lemon, sits one of Wodehouse’s greatest raconteurs. Mr Mulliner, his vivid imagination lubricated by Miss Postlethwaite the barmaid, has fabulous stories to tell of the extraordinary behaviour of his far-flung family: In particular there’s Wilfred, inventor of Raven Gypsy face-cream and Snow of the Mountain Lotion, who lights on the formula for Buck-U-Uppo, a tonic given to elephants to enable them to face tigers with the necessary nonchalance. Its explosive effects on a shy young curate and then the higher clergy is gravely revealed.

And there’s his cousin James, the detective-story writer, who has inherited a cottage more haunted than anything in his own imagination. And stuttering George the crossword whizz. And Isadore Zinzinheimer, head of the Bigger, Better & Brighter Motion Picture Company. Tall tales all – but among Wodehouse’s best.

Highballs for Breakfast

P.G. Wodehouse

'A splendid anthology' The Times

No writer knew better than PG Wodehouse how a drink can lift the spirits – and he was a master at the high comic effects of having a few too many. Highballs for Breakfast is a handpicked selection of wit, wisdom and comic moments from Wodehouse’s work that involve getting pickled or plastered, or lathered or sozzled, and getting in and out of all manner of scrapes.

If some great writers dwelled on the darker side of drinking, Wodehouse was concerned with the pure pleasure to be had from ‘the magic bottle’ and getting outside of the contents of a tall glass. His imperishable writing displays a well-turned appreciation for all kinds of booze – cocktails, champagne, port, whiskey and brandy (with soda, of course); but also the humble pint, and even the infamous poteen.

This sparkling collection captures Wodehouse at his best on being terribly thirsty, or drowning one’s sorrows, or knocking one back for Dutch courage. It finds him celebrating the special atmospheres of the English country pub and the Manhattan barroom. And it shows him to be exceptionally good on hangovers, but equally so on hangover cures, such as the legendary pick-me-ups prepared for Bertie Wooster by the dependable Jeeves.

For all lovers of a laugh and a drink, Highballs for Breakfast is a tonic, a bracer, and a tissue-restorer.

Jeeves and the Yule-Tide Spirit and Other Stories

P.G. Wodehouse

‘Does one desire the Yule-tide spirit, sir?’
‘Certainly one does. I am all for it.’

Aunts, engagements, misunderstandings and hangover cures; this delightful collection from ‘the greatest chronicler of a certain kind of Englishness’ (Julian Fellowes) brings together a baker’s dozen of P. G. Wodehouse’s finest short stories.

‘A comic master’ David Walliams

‘A cavalcade of perfect joy’ Caitlin Moran

The Prince and Betty

P.G. Wodehouse

A classic musical comedy plot turned into a novel, The Prince and Betty is the story of a man who gives up everything for his girl. Fortunately, she chances to be the step-daughter of a millionaire. John Maude and Betty Silver are in love, but when John turns out to be heir to the principality of Mervo, a small Mediterranean island not a thousand miles from Monte Carlo, he finds himself ensnared in the establishment of a new casino on the island, much to his beloved’s high-minded disgust. She leaves him and takes a job with an American family in London; he abandons his post to follow her. Eventually their misunderstandings are disentangled: the pair are reunited, betrothed and bound for a new life in the United States. And so it is that, in the process of telling their story, published early in his career, Wodehouse constructs the critique of Europe versus America, privilege versus enterprise, decadence versus adventure, which was to underpin many of his later tales.

Sunset At Blandings

P.G. Wodehouse

In Wodehouse’s final novel, unfinished at his death, the author returns to his favourite part of England for one last time. In a classic plot, Vicky Underwood is parted from her fiancé, Jeff Bennison, which means that her uncle, Galahad Threepwood, has to engineer a complicated plot to bring them back together. Many old friends reappear to take their last bow: the Earl of Emsworth, Dame Daphne Winkworth, Beach the butler, the Empress of Blandings (Lord Emsworth’s prize pig), Freddie Threepwood (his son), G. Ovens, innkeeper, and an array of the earl’s formidable sisters. There may be trouble in the air, but at Blandings Castle it is always summer, always quiet and sunlit - and the powers of darkness are always ultimately defeated. Just how that defeat would have been brought about, had Wodehouse completed his story, is shown in the copious notes he made for it. These are included in this volume, together with commentary by Richard Usborne, Tony Ring and Norman Murphy.

Louder & Funnier

P.G. Wodehouse

In these articles first produced for magazines and substantially rewritten for book publication, Wodehouse reveals his enduring brilliance as a comic writer of non-fiction. But the move out of fiction does not mean a move into unfamiliar territory: any reader of Wodehouse’s stories will be familiar with the topics covered here which preoccupied him all his life, ranging from Shakespeare, Hollywood and musical comedy, to butlers, thrillers, ocean liners and income tax.

Sunset At Blandings

P.G. Wodehouse

In Wodehouse’s final novel, unfinished at his death, the author returns to his favourite part of England for one last time. In a classic plot, Vicky Underwood is parted from her fiancé, Jeff Bennison, which means that her uncle, Galahad Threepwood, has to engineer a complicated plot to bring them back together. Many old friends reappear to take their last bow: the Earl of Emsworth, Dame Daphne Winkworth, Beach the butler, the Empress of Blandings (Lord Emsworth’s prize pig), Freddie Threepwood (his son), G. Ovens, innkeeper, and an array of the earl’s formidable sisters. There may be trouble in the air, but at Blandings Castle it is always summer, always quiet and sunlit - and the powers of darkness are always ultimately defeated. Just how that defeat would have been brought about, had Wodehouse completed his story, is shown in the copious notes he made for it. These are included in this volume, together with commentary by Richard Usborne, Tony Ring and Norman Murphy.

Over Seventy

P.G. Wodehouse

First published in 1956, this collection of articles covers Wodehouse's feelings on United States, his adopted homeland all collected into one edition. Features a collection of articles originally from Punch magazine as well as America, I Like You, all with Wodehouse's usual wit and personality

The Luck Stone

P.G. Wodehouse

Originally published as a serial in Chums under the pseudonym of Basil Windham, The Luck Stone is thoroughly Wodehouse with his trademark sticky situations, quirky characters, sly humour and wit, and of course, his renowned prose. All written in the form of a letter to a friend, this dark and suspenseful plot will never fail to disappoint

Not George Washington

P.G. Wodehouse

This early novel, written in collaboration with a friend, is a fascinating curiosity which suggests that Wodehouse might have become a very different, experimental sort of writer, had he continued to write in the same vein.

Using multiple narrators, playing with literary stereotypes and identities, it tells the story of an aspiring young writer, James Orlebar Cloyster, prepared to do almost anything, first for success and then for gratification. By making Cloyster a mild, affable young man of the sort so familiar in his later novels, Wodehouse creates a comic disparity between the character’s lofty professions of virtue and his unscrupulous behaviour. As the story progresses, we realise that he is not unusual: all the main characters are unscrupulous in one way or another, ready to cheat and lie in pursuit of their ends, hence the title of the book.

Not George Washington contains many fine scenes, and Cloyster’s narrative displays the calm mastery of story-telling Wodehouse had already made his own. If awkwardly executed, it is cleverly plotted, springing several surprises along the way. Clearly autobiographical in origin, it also invites readers to reflect on the nature of talent, fame, failure and success, villainy and honour - themes which continued to recur in the author’s work for another sixty years.

Bring on the Girls

P.G. Wodehouse

Despite an enormous solo output, P. G Wodehouse often co-operated with other writers, especially in the early stages of his career, exchanging or sharing plots, advising on problems and even writing books and stage-works together. Bring on the Girls is a characteristically mordant account of his work with Guy Bolton in musical comedy, which occupied much of Wodehouse’s energy from his arrival in America and effectively made his reputation. This is a tactful book - there are no shocking revelations - but an extremely amusing one, with vivid portraits of such stars as Gertrude Lawrence and insights into febrile life behind the scenes.

Performing Flea

P.G. Wodehouse

In this series of letters to William Townend, a fellow-writer and friend since their schooldays at Dulwich College, Wodehouse discusses in some detail his literary outlook, writing methods and constant hunt for new plots. Characteristically modest and lightly humorous in tone, the letters are nevertheless revealing of a dedicated, practical and scrupulous craftsman whose most brilliant inspirations were grounded in decades of unremitting hard work.
The letters are introduced and annotated by the editor, who provided Wodehouse with the idea for one of his most famous characters, Ukridge.

Tales of Wrykyn And Elsewhere

P.G. Wodehouse

The stories in this collection reflect Wodehouse’s own happy schooldays at Dulwich College but they also do a good deal more. Although among his earliest attempts at fiction they give fascinating glimpses of a time when motor cars were novelties, schoolmasters wore mortar boards and gowns, and America was a rising power in the world.

The best of them display the author’s love of games and knack for neat plotting. In one, a resourceful teenaged heroine helps a truant schoolboy cricketer by marooning his credulous schoolmaster at the top of a church tower until the match is over. Another describes a boy escaping from the scene of his crime by a passing car, only to be caught out by a last-minute revelation. Several Sherlock Holmes parodies read as what they are – high-spirited experiments – but the longer stories delve deeper into character: together, they recreate a vanished world of school shops, fagging, Latin prep and hearty teas.

Jeeves & Wooster: The Collected Radio Dramas

P.G. Wodehouse (and others)

Six acclaimed dramatisations starring Michael Hordern and Richard Briers as Jeeves and Wooster. Also featuring Maurice Denham, Paul Eddington, David Jason, John Le Mesurier, Miriam Margolyes, Jonathan Cecil, Liza Goddard and Patrick Cargill. In The Inimitable Jeeves, Aunt Agatha is forcing Bertie to get engaged to the formidable Honoria Glossop. Can Jeeves save the day? In The Code of the Woosters, who would think that a silver cow-creamer could cause so much trouble? Uncle Tom wants it and Aunt Dahlia is blackmailing Bertie to steal it. Right Ho, Jeeves sees mayhem breaking out at Brinkley Court, but there are more brains in the Wooster household than just Jeeves... In Stiff Upper Lip, Jeeves, Madeline Bassett and Gussie Fink-Nottle’s engagement is on the rocks, and poor Bertie's next in line for the fair maiden’s hand. Jeeves and the Feudal Spirit finds Jeeves in for a few surprises when returns from his annual shrimping holiday in Bognor Regis. In Jeeves: Joy in the Morning, Steeple Bumphleigh is a village to be avoided for Bertie, as it contains the appalling Aunt Agatha. Still, there are good deeds to be done.

17 CDs. 17 hrs 35 mins.

Kid Brady Stories & A Man of Means

P.G. Wodehouse

This volume reprints two of Wodehouse’s earliest books which take the form of story sequences linked by a central character, a technique he used many times thereafter. Delightful in themselves, they are interesting chiefly as windows on a great writer’s early evolution.

In The Man of Means, he looks forward to Bertie Wooster and Ukridge, but also back to his Victorian models, in a fantastic tale of the little man struggling with fate. When a humble clerk comes into a fortune, he embarks on a series of misadventures which suggest that wealth is not necessarily an unmixed blessing. Here we see signs of the satirical writer Wodehouse might have become, and the spirit of Chaplin is not far away.

The Swoop! & The Military Invasion of America

P.G. Wodehouse

"Deep down in his heart the genuine Englishman has a rugged distaste for seeing his country invaded by a foreign army. People were asking themselves by what right these aliens had overrun British soil. An ever-growing feeling of annoyance had begun to lay hold of the nation.”

Clarence Chugwater is not a Boy Scout for nothing. It is summer 1909 and everyone is too interested in the Test Match to notice that England has been invaded by the Germans. And the Russians. And the Chinese. Not to mention a ‘boisterous band of the Young Turks’, a mad Mullah, and a brace of North African pirates. The government has recently abolished the army so there is nothing to be done about it anyway, except give a masterly display of polite indifference. But this would be to reckon without patriotic Clarence, ‘Boy of Destiny’, who alone is prepared to stand up to the foe, and who devises a highly unorthodox plan to restore his country to freedom…

The Swoop! Or, How Clarence Saved England reprints the 33 black and white drawings by C. Harrison that accompanied the first edition. It is supplemented by The Military Invasion of America, in which Clarence’s story is humorously transplanted across the Atlantic.

Biography

Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (always known as ‘Plum’) wrote more than ninety novels and some three hundred short stories over 73 years. He is widely recognised as the greatest 20th-century writer of humour in the English language.

Perhaps best known for the escapades of Bertie Wooster and Jeeves, Wodehouse also created the world of Blandings Castle, home to Lord Emsworth and his cherished pig, the Empress of Blandings. His stories include gems concerning the irrepressible and disreputable Ukridge; Psmith, the elegant socialist; the ever-so-slightly-unscrupulous Fifth Earl of Ickenham, better known as Uncle Fred; and those related by Mr Mulliner, the charming raconteur of The Angler’s Rest, and the Oldest Member at the Golf Club.

In 1936 he was awarded the Mark Twain Prize for ‘having made an outstanding and lasting contribution to the happiness of the world’. He was made a Doctor of Letters by Oxford University in 1939 and in 1975, aged 93, he was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II. He died shortly afterwards, on St Valentine’s Day.