Reviews

  • Superbly translated... Alexievich's choice of truth as hero is the right one for the age of Putin and Trump

    Giles Whittell, The Times
  • As shattering and addictive as Chernobyl Prayer, this is a polyphonic tour de force that shines a light on war, the plight of heroes, and why post-Soviet Russia is as it is

    Kapka Kassabova, Herald Scotland
  • A masterpiece of reportage

    New York Review of Books
  • Alexievich is like a doctor probing the scar tissue of a traumatised nation

    Guy Chazan, Financial Times
  • What Alexievich is doing is giving voice to the voiceless, exposing not only stories we wouldn't otherwise hear but individuals as well

    David Ulin, Los Angeles Times
  • The least well-known wonderful writer I've ever come across

    Jenni Murray, BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour
  • Alexievich serves no ideology, only an ideal: to listen closely enough to the ordinary voices of her time to orchestrate them into extraordinary books

    Philip Gourevitch, New Yorker
  • Alexievich has become one of my heroes

    Atul Gawande
  • The Belarusian writer has spent decades in listening mode. Alexievich put in thousands of hours with her tape recorder across the lands of the former Soviet Union, collecting and collating stories from ordinary people. She wove those tales into elegant books of such power and insight, that in 2015 she received the Nobel prize for literature

    Shaun Walker, Guardian
  • Alexievich's "documentary novels" are crafted and edited with a reporter's cool eye for detail and a poet's ear for the intricate rhythms of human speech. Reading them is like eavesdropping on a confessional. This is history at its rawest and most uncomfortably intimate

    Andrew Dickson, Evening Standard