Reviews

  • To get it out of the way: these are the best books I have read this year ... Childhood has the simple declarative sentences of Natalia Ginzburg and the pervasive horror of a good fairy story

    John Self, New Statesman
  • Mordant, vibrantly confessional... A masterpiece

    Guardian
  • Semi-miraculous, raw and poignant ... Radiates the clear light of truth and stands as the ultimate victory of a life that must have felt, in the living of it, like a defeat

    Alex Preston, Observer
  • Intense, elegant ... Ditlevsen's portrait of Vesterbro in the Twenties has something of the same texture of Elena Ferrante's description of the poor Neapolitan neighbourhood in which her heroines grow up

    Lucy Scholes, The Daily Telegraph
  • Wrenching sadness and pitch-black comedy ... Sharp, tough and tender

    Boyd Tonkin, Spectator
  • Incredibly compelling and timely

    Amber Butchard, Saturday Review
  • Ditlevsen's taut, simple prose shines a light on what life and love were like for working-class women in 20th century Copenhagen. Elena Ferrante fans, take note

    Stylist
  • Despite the darkness that haunts these three books, they shine with Ditlevsen's honesty and humanity ... Her work, seemingly so simple, has the miraculous quality of a life perceived in perfect clarity. Despite the author's untimely death, The Copenhagen Trilogy is a powerful - and uplifting - testament of survival

    Erica Wagner
  • As in much of the best autofiction, the protagonist's weakness is counterpoised by the strength of her voice ... [Ditlevsen speaks] beyond the cruel and disappointing figures she encounters to us, her readers, awaiting her in another time and another place

    Lara Feigel, Guardian