Masthead
Masthead

George Orwell

Orwell on Freedom
  • Orwell on Freedom

  • George Orwell

    With an introduction by Kamila Shamsie

    ‘Freedom is the freedom to say that two plus two equals four. If that is granted, all else follows.’

    GEORGE ORWELL is one of the world’s most famous writers and social commentators. Through his writing he exposed the unjust sufferings of the poor and unemployed, warned against totalitarianism and defended freedom of speech.

    This selection, from both his novels and non-fiction, charts his prescient and clear-eyed thinking on the subject of FREEDOM. It ranges from pieces on individual liberty, society and technology, to political liberty, revolution and the importance of free speech. His ambition to create a fairer and more egalitarian society is essential inspiration as we strive for freedom and equality in today's world.

    'If liberty means anything at all it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.'

Eric Arthur Blair (1903-1950), better known by his pen-name, George Orwell, was born in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. An author and journalist, Orwell was one of the most prominent and influential figures in twentieth-century literature. His unique political allegory Animal Farm was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with the dystopia of Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. His novels and non-fiction include Burmese Days, Down and Out in Paris and London, The Road to Wigan Pier and Homage to Catalonia.